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  1. #1
    curiouser and curiouser bluestripes's Avatar
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    Default bright blue mushrooms

    i found the color of these stunning.

    might be unspecified species of psilocybe, but i wouldn't be sure:



    a species of copelandia (the blue meanie or copelandia cyanescens, i think, but might be a different one):



    what seems to be an unspecified species of purplish-blue cortinarius:



    the blue milk-cap, or lactarius indigo:





    i was surprised when i found out it was edible. we here eat the orange milk-cap (lactarius deliciosus) and other similar-colored species, and consider them to be some of the tastiest mushrooms ever, but a blue one looks a little too strange.
    Likes Betty Blue liked this post

  2. #2
    failure to thrive AphroditeGoneAwry's Avatar
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    Those are so eerily cool. I've always wanted to take a mushroom class, so I could identify mushrooms and harvest them on my hikes. Is it hard?
    Ni/Ti/Fe/Si
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  3. #3
    Senior Member Tiger Owl's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by AphroditeGoneAwry View Post
    Those are so eerily cool. I've always wanted to take a mushroom class, so I could identify mushrooms and harvest them on my hikes. Is it hard?
    Less hard with a good guidebook (or two) but it is still an inherently dangerous hobby if you are harvesting for food. There are so many look alike species and many variables to consider.

    To the OP, beautiful photos, thank you for sharing.
    INTJ 5w4 sx/sp 584 ILI-Ni

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    failure to thrive AphroditeGoneAwry's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by earthtrekker1775 View Post
    Less hard with a good guidebook (or two) but it is still an inherently dangerous hobby if you are harvesting for food. There are so many look alike species and many variables to consider.

    To the OP, beautiful photos, thank you for sharing.
    I know. My neighbors are really into it, and so it gave me the idea. But I'm pretty cautious. I barely eat morels. I can't even bring myself to fix shaggy manes. And they are harmless and easily identified.

    Every time I think of mushrooms, this is what I think about:

    [YOUTUBE="axFj-sv6wiw"]lol[/YOUTUBE]
    Ni/Ti/Fe/Si
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    Life Path 11

    The more one loves God, the more it is that having nothing in the world means everything, and the less one loves God, the more it is that having everything in the world means nothing.

    Do not resist an evil person, but to him who strikes you on the one cheek, offer also the other. ~Matthew 5:39

    songofmary.wordpress.com


  5. #5
    Senior Member Tiger Owl's Avatar
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    That is one creepy group of girls. That is what he gets for trusting others.

    My favorite mushrooms are in the Amanita genus. With names like the Death Cap and the Destroying Angel you just know they are interesting.
    INTJ 5w4 sx/sp 584 ILI-Ni

  6. #6
    curiouser and curiouser bluestripes's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by AphroditeGoneAwry View Post
    Those are so eerily cool. I've always wanted to take a mushroom class, so I could identify mushrooms and harvest them on my hikes. Is it hard?
    no, i don't think so. each edible species has its own distinctive features. for chanterelles, it is the bright, sunny orange color, the characteristic curved, complex shape of the cap and the inseparable gills; for brittlegills, the fragile flesh that easily crumbles into flat fragments; for orange milk-caps, the deep orange color of the cap and the fact that the flesh bleeds orange "milk" when cut, which oxidizes and turns green within minutes; for the gypsy mushroom, the shabby-looking cap that tends to fracture at the edges and the darker (creamy to cinnamon-brown) surface and gills that stand out against the white inner flesh. boletes are altogether impossible to mistake for any other mushroom because of their whole appearance (the ones with pink or red gills are to be avoided, though). there are many others i can't think of at the moment.

    but then, of course, i've been doing this since i was a child. collecting and consuming mushrooms is a very culture-specific activity - in our country, as in some others, the knowledge required for this is acquired automatically, while one is still very young, and one rarely gives any thought to it (if at all). this was the case with me.

    i think it could be much more difficult (and dangerous) for someone who doesn't belong to a mushroom-loving culture like ours. similar, perhaps, to the situation we have now with psychedelic fungi such as psilocybe sp., which haven't been collected here until the 70s-80s or so and still feel largely unfamiliar. some use photos printed out from the internet and/or guidebooks to identify them, and perhaps they are good at this, too, but, frankly, i wouldn't risk so much if i were them.

    i guess the golden rules for staying safe are: never eat a mushroom that is entirely while, especially if it has gills; never eat a white gilled mushroom with a yellow, gray, bronze, brown or greenish cap; never eat any "little brown mushrooms". that way, at least, one can guarantee that one isn't going to collect something life-threatening.

    and it is best to stay away from brittlegills (russula sp.) which have a bright purple/raspberry-colored cap and stains of the same color on the stipe (or "blush"), especially if the flesh tastes bitter when licked. some people get violently sick after eating these. (i personally don't attempt to distinguish between different species of brittlegills - i will collect any regardless of their color and do not sample them for bitterness, but then i never eat them raw and i take care to boil them well, for approx. 10-15 min. besides, i don't usually have any adverse GI reactions to mushrooms, but many other people do).

    Quote Originally Posted by AphroditeGoneAwry View Post
    I know. My neighbors are really into it, and so it gave me the idea. But I'm pretty cautious. I barely eat morels. I can't even bring myself to fix shaggy manes. And they are harmless and easily identified.
    ironically, these are the two species of wild mushroom i have never collected or tasted. i'm not even sure if i have seen them growing in the forest. my grandfather (who taught me everything he knew about mushrooms) used to dismiss them as second-rate - i remember him telling me that morels were more or less like rubbish when compared to other species, and he would call shaggy manes "dung growths".

    Quote Originally Posted by earthtrekker1775 View Post
    To the OP, beautiful photos, thank you for sharing.
    you're welcome. they made me stare when i first saw them (i forget where - they have been sitting on my HD for months). i had known that there are some rare deep red/raspberry species in south america and some in new zealand that are a bright grassy green, but it was the first time i was seeing any that were blue.

  7. #7
    failure to thrive AphroditeGoneAwry's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by earthtrekker1775 View Post
    That is one creepy group of girls. That is what he gets for trusting others.

    My favorite mushrooms are in the Amanita genus. With names like the Death Cap and the Destroying Angel you just know they are interesting.
    lol. Yeah, poor Clint. That movie was deeply disturbing to me as a girl. It totally freaked me out, yet I watched it over and over again on cable.


    If I saw this in the wild, I'd probably think it was an edible kind:



    But it is a death cap and evidently responsible for the most mushroom poisonings in the world.

    And for fun, here is another Amanita muscaria:



    Quote Originally Posted by bluestripes View Post
    no, i don't think so. each edible species has its own distinctive features. for chanterelles, it is the bright, sunny orange color, the characteristic curved, complex shape of the cap and the inseparable gills; for brittlegills, the fragile flesh that easily crumbles into flat fragments; for orange milk-caps, the deep orange color of the cap and the fact that the flesh bleeds orange "milk" when cut, which oxidizes and turns green within minutes; for the gypsy mushroom, the shabby-looking cap that tends to fracture at the edges and the darker (creamy to cinnamon-brown) surface and gills that stand out against the white inner flesh. boletes are altogether impossible to mistake for any other mushroom because of their whole appearance (the ones with pink or red gills are to be avoided, though). there are many others i can't think of at the moment.

    but then, of course, i've been doing this since i was a child. collecting and consuming mushrooms is a very culture-specific activity - in our country, as in some others, the knowledge required for this is acquired automatically, while one is still very young, and one rarely gives any thought to it (if at all). this was the case with me.

    i think it could be much more difficult (and dangerous) for someone who doesn't belong to a mushroom-loving culture like ours. similar, perhaps, to the situation we have now with psychedelic fungi such as psilocybe sp., which haven't been collected here until the 70s-80s or so and still feel largely unfamiliar. some use photos printed out from the internet and/or guidebooks to identify them, and perhaps they are good at this, too, but, frankly, i wouldn't risk so much if i were them.

    i guess the golden rules for staying safe are: never eat a mushroom that is entirely while, especially if it has gills; never eat a white gilled mushroom with a yellow, gray, bronze, brown or greenish cap; never eat any "little brown mushrooms". that way, at least, one can guarantee that one isn't going to collect something life-threatening.

    and it is best to stay away from brittlegills (russula sp.) which have a bright purple/raspberry-colored cap and stains of the same color on the stipe (or "blush"), especially if the flesh tastes bitter when licked. some people get violently sick after eating these. (i personally don't attempt to distinguish between different species of brittlegills - i will collect any regardless of their color and do not sample them for bitterness, but then i never eat them raw and i take care to boil them well, for approx. 10-15 min. besides, i don't usually have any adverse GI reactions to mushrooms, but many other people do).



    ironically, these are the two species of wild mushroom i have never collected or tasted. i'm not even sure if i have seen them growing in the forest. my grandfather (who taught me everything he knew about mushrooms) used to dismiss them as second-rate - i remember him telling me that morels were more or less like rubbish when compared to other species, and he would call shaggy manes "dung growths".
    Haha! Yeah, morels are considered a delicacy here and fetch a high price per pound, if one gathers for profit. I like them a lot sliced and sauteed in a lemon-cream-butter sauce with fish.


    ...Dung growths.


    Thanks for the info. It just reinforces to me that I need to take a class before attempting to harvest for eating.

    Do you know much about using them for dyeing (no pun intended.lol) purposes, like wool? I wonder if blue and red would make blue or red dye? Usually they don't (i think); usually wild plants just make a muted dye somewhere from off-white to brown. But one always hopes to hear about a local wild mushroom (plant) that makes bright colors.
    Ni/Ti/Fe/Si
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    ~Torah observant, Christ inspired~
    Life Path 11

    The more one loves God, the more it is that having nothing in the world means everything, and the less one loves God, the more it is that having everything in the world means nothing.

    Do not resist an evil person, but to him who strikes you on the one cheek, offer also the other. ~Matthew 5:39

    songofmary.wordpress.com


  8. #8

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    I'd love to try the blue mushrooms, although are any of the mushrooms that different in taste to the regular mushrooms which are mass grown and harvested for the supermarkets?

  9. #9
    Senior Member Tiger Owl's Avatar
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    Yummy fly agaric mushrooms. I would strongly recommend that nobody ever eat one but they do have some psychotropic as well as toxic qualities.
    INTJ 5w4 sx/sp 584 ILI-Ni

  10. #10
    curiouser and curiouser bluestripes's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by AphroditeGoneAwry View Post
    Haha! Yeah, morels are considered a delicacy here and fetch a high price per pound, if one gathers for profit. I like them a lot sliced and sauteed in a lemon-cream-butter sauce with fish.
    i should try them sometime. though i’m not sure we have them in my area – they are supposed to be available, but i have never seen any at the marketplace in the fall.

    Quote Originally Posted by AphroditeGoneAwry View Post
    Do you know much about using them for dyeing (no pun intended.lol) purposes, like wool? I wonder if blue and red would make blue or red dye? Usually they don't (i think); usually wild plants just make a muted dye somewhere from off-white to brown. But one always hopes to hear about a local wild mushroom (plant) that makes bright colors.
    i don’t think i know much, but some time ago i was interested in this because i wanted to find out whether one would still be able to dye fabric in the absence of flowering (angiosperm) plants. at some point i discovered this site:

    http://www.mushroomsforcolor.com/Cor...shroomDyes.htm

    it seems that mushrooms can yield a variety of hues, which tend to be in the spectrum that spans green (leaf green, forest green, khaki, grayish-green), gray (stone gray, light mouse gray), brown (umbre and ochre shades, taupe), yellow, orange (reddish-orange, pumpkin orange, tangerine) and pink (peach, light petal pink). some of the colors can be quite vivid – for example, certain species of dermocybe can be used to make bright orange or pink dyes, whereas phaeolus schweinitzii yields a striking lemon yellow.

    i think i’ve also seen blue mushroom dyes, but these tend to me of a more watered-down shade (teal, pastel turquoise, light baby blue or blue-green). what seems to be noteworthy is that there do not seem to be any brighter blue hues that would fall in the indigo/cobalt blue or royal blue range, so i’m not sure it would be possible to use fungi to produce those.

    there is also this:

    http://moonflower77.dreamwidth.org/114640.html

    it’s a list i compiled that is very very boring (to those who are not interested in botany or mycology) but more or less exhaustive. i tried to include each species of mushroom that was mentioned in the sources i had.

    Quote Originally Posted by Lark View Post
    I'd love to try the blue mushrooms, although are any of the mushrooms that different in taste to the regular mushrooms which are mass grown and harvested for the supermarkets?
    forest mushrooms do have a distinct flavor, different from the more usual brown or white field mushrooms (which are the mushrooms one typically finds in stores over here). each species – chanterelles, orange milk-caps or the various boletes – has a subtle undertone of its own. the latter are especially fragrant, thus great for making soup.

    and i don’t think our forest mushrooms have much in common with mass-marketed mushrooms that originate in east or southeast asia. i like experimenting with those, but they feel so foreign they don’t taste like “mushrooms” to me. once this september i bought two large king oyster mushrooms at a supermarket because i had been curious about them for a long time, and made a thick stew with sour cream and mango curry spices, beef stroganof style, which included some chicken liver and different boletes. i sauteed the chinese mushrooms separately with some onions, because i thought they shouldn’t be boiled beforehand, and sampled some while they were cooking. i am not sure how to describe it – it was some manner of “something” that was tasty and tender, but, to me, nothing similar to what a mushroom should be like.

    i think boletes and chanterelles should be commercially available in dried (or canned) form in most countries. if you are in the uk, you should be able to find some at least at the french or italian specialty stores – they are an important part of both cuisines.

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