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  1. #31
    Senior Member Tiltyred's Avatar
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    I act really shocked when they do something I don't want, like I'm horrified. *GASP! Oh, bad cat, really bad!" not loud, but shocked, shocked enough that they're caught by surprise by it. The cat I have now, I just make a sound, kind of like Ott! and she stops what she's doing and looks embarrassed. It's harder to train them when you have more than one, though. They team up on you.

    p.s. I have an old trunk for the cat to sit on so she can watch me while I'm in the kitchen. She can see what's on the counter. Maybe that would help? (probably not...)

  2. #32
    Feline Member kelric's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Z Buck McFate View Post
    Cats HATE water.
    <-------





    I think that ValaFaye or jimrckhnd's ideas are probably the most likely to work, if also the most annoying to maintain. You don't want the cat associating the punishment with being on the counter *and* you noticing and doing something. You want the punishment to happen whether you're there or not. The cat's not going to notice that *you* set up the sticky-tape or cat-mines. The cat will see you with the water bottle, and you're likely to get the "behaves only when it has to" thing going on. Cats are clever and mischievous.
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  3. #33
    can't handcuff the wind Z Buck McFate's Avatar
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    ^I just assumed we were talking about a domestic housecat, and not a tiger. But then, this is Whatever, maybe I shouldn’t have written off that possibility.

    All I know is the water bottle trick worked really well for me with my cats. It isn’t even really that they hate water so much as they don’t like getting sprayed. One of my cats would actually come in the bathroom and sit on the edge of the tub while I was taking a bath, yet the spray bottle still worked with her. She loved the sound of running water, but she hated having it splashed on her.

    And I mean yeah, like I said, they almost certainly associated me with the water bottle, they’d bolt just from seeing me reach for it- it still worked. Regardless of where the negative consequences come from, if they consistently happen concurrently with the action an association will build and they’ll instinctively avoid it. As long as there are other things for them to turn to- places that are just as appealing, but without the unwanted consequences- eventually they give up and stick to those other things. It is important not to overdo it, though. If they get sprayed too often for too many things, a bigger association will build between the person and getting sprayed than between the unwanted action and getting sprayed- and they’ll just start avoiding people instead. If it isn’t limited to just a couple of specific actions, the spraying seems arbitrary.
    Last edited by Z Buck McFate; 09-14-2011 at 03:39 PM. Reason: correct grammar
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  4. #34
    The High Priestess Amargith's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Z Buck McFate View Post
    Also: @ vala faye's comment, I don't know how much being an indoor cat has to do with water aversion. All my cats, even the ones my family had while growing up, were all exclusively indoor cats- most of which had never spent more than an hour outside in their entire life-but all of them had a serious aversion to water. I can't remember the reason most speculated just now, but cats are just born with it.

    Cats do not like water as they don't have a coat that repels water, like dogs do. They actually risk freezing to death if they get submerged and cannot find shelter. The reason that outdoor cats are more likely to be aware of this danger is sheer experience. If indoor cats grow up inside, the chances of them ever getting drenched are relatively minor. And if mommy wasn't around long enough to actually teach them aversion from water, which often is the case with kittens, chances are they have no clue that it's dangerous. Even if they get wet (or even bathed), they're in a warm environment with our central heating in most houses, making the lesson less..clear (though small kittens can still suffer from hypothermia if they aren't properly washed and kept warm, even indoors). Since these cats are around 6 months, chances are that IF they are indoor cats and haven't experienced what 'cold' from being drenched is like, they're unlikely to find the water bottle anything but curious. Sure, they can decide it's annoying to get sprayed, but there's
    just as many kittens who would get curious and find it intriguing..all depending on their character

    I in fact have several cats that until recently didn't mind water. Now that they go outside and have experienced cold and rain..I should test if they've learned the lesson
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  5. #35
    @.~*virinaĉo*~.@ Totenkindly's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Z Buck McFate View Post
    All I know is the water bottle trick worked really well for me with my cats. It isn’t even really that they hate water so much as they don’t like getting sprayed. One of my cats would actually come in the bathroom and sit on the edge of the tub while I was taking a bath, yet the spray bottle still worked with her. She loved the sound of running water, but she hated having it splashed on her.
    Yes, my cat is obsessed with the bathroom too, so much that we've shut the door much of the time. He would either play in the toilet, or he actually still climbs into the bathtub (empty) and walks all around, and examines the leaky spigot. When I've taken a bath, he'll even come up and walk on the edge of the tub to look at the soap bubbles. he's fascinated by that stuff, but he doesn't like getting wet from someone else.

    And I mean yeah, like I said, they almost certainly associated me with the water bottle, they’d bolt just from seeing me reach for it- it still worked. Regardless of where the negative consequences come from, if they consistently happen concurrently with the action an association will build and they’ll instinctively avoid it. As long as there are other things for them to turn to- places that are just as appealing, but without the unwanted consequences- eventually they give up and stick to those other things. It is important not to overdo it, though. If they get sprayed too often for too many things, a bigger association will build between the person and getting sprayed than between the unwanted action and getting sprayed- and they’ll just start avoiding people instead. If it isn’t limited to just a couple of specific actions, the spraying seems arbitrary.
    I'm aware of that, but it's still kind of fun on occasion to have him playing on the other side of the room and then use the spray bottle to arc water on his head... so that no matter where he goes, he's still getting wet and can't figure out where it's coming from. He just has this look of, "Wth is going on????" His reactions are priceless.
    "Hey Capa -- We're only stardust." ~ "Sunshine"

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  6. #36
    can't handcuff the wind Z Buck McFate's Avatar
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    Ha^. I love cats. I seem to remember my ENP ex doing the same thing to my youngest cat. It turned out we didn’t even need to discipline her, she just never jumped on the counters to begin with so the consistency factor was a moot point with her. And anything that can evoke those instant “you again!”- as if it’s a returning arch-nemesis- or wtf? expressions really are priceless and sorta addictive.

    @Vala Faye: that is interesting. I’m having a hard time believing cats aren’t just born with an aversion to getting sprayed (that they hate getting hit with water when it isn’t on their own terms), regardless (J < - me, lol?), if only because it worked so well for me and because it’s so often one of the top suggestions on how to discipline them. Part of me wants to suggest that most people aren’t consistent enough with only sticking to one or two specific spots to discipline them. I’ll admit though that I only have experience with two cats (as an adult, that I needed to train myself) because my third cat didn’t need it, and the first two actually were born feral (found them in forest preserve as kittens). I’ll probably need to have this conversation with a few different people before it sinks in. I’m too ‘J’ for myself even sometimes.
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  7. #37
    The High Priestess Amargith's Avatar
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    I thought that cats were born with that aversion too, till I handreared some kittens myself. And truth be told, I was never able to punish them with the spray bottle, especially as they had longhaired coats and didn't even feel the water. On top of that, as they get so dirty before they learn to clean themselves, you almost have to wash parts of them to keep it managable. But that's with hot water and instant dry towels and hot beds afterwards. Water still doesn't scare the one kitten I kept. Sure, she'll go like..'what's that, stop that!', but she remains unimpressed. Even now that she goes out in the rain, she has that same attitude. It just mildly irritates her (and then comes and uses me as a towel when she comes back inside ). She lies in my bathtub when it's hot, and plays with any beam of water she can find. She doesn't evne *feel* the water, as she needs serious soaking before her fur gets wet enough to transmit the cold to the skin. Once it does however..she is at serious risk of hypothermia.

    For that matter, sphinxes (naked cats) tend to love being bathed if they were raised the right way, as they need it to keep their skin in tip top shape and are therefore handled from a very early age to teach them to tolerate water. I also remember that we had a cat that we hand reared when I was 10, which was only 4 days old. She got 'cleaned off' under the faucet when she did a number 1 or 2 (normally, mommy licks it up..my mom didn't really fancy doing that ). She, as an adult, was never impressed by water, nor frightened by it.

    I do think this is a nurture issue, at least, thats what my experience and training tells me.
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  8. #38
    Senior Member Tiltyred's Avatar
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    I don't think it's the water. I think it's the surprise. Loud sudden noises work just as well. Anything that is a shock.

  9. #39
    The High Priestess Amargith's Avatar
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    ^ Loud noises work as well, indeed. And yes, the startling aspect definitely helps, but it's also coz their main sense, their highest developed sense is hearing. Loud noises = ouch...

    The problem with noises is, how do you administer them? I also use clapping and yelling their name, but when I leave the room, I *know* they'll do those things anyways as they associate it with me. Remove me from the equation and they know they're free to do what they want. If you can do a 'deus ex machina'.. that's the most ideal to teach them not to do something, permanently.
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  10. #40
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    They're not bastards, they probably just want to be with you aside from their preference of high places. I trained my cats not to jump on tables and counters by putting them down and leading them to their food bowl on the floor. Don't give them food if they're on the counter/tables, so they will understand they get no reward from jumping up there and that the goodies are downon the floor.
    As to your blood, well, cats are naturally curious and they probably thought it was just another strange liquid spilled on the table.
    As to your cupcake, dude, my condolences. I'm pretty picky on my sweets too.

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