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  1. #11
    insert random title here Randomnity's Avatar
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    yeah, pricing it per weight makes zero sense, unless either nutrition or the amount of food you consume in a day is determined purely by weight (hint: they aren't).
    -end of thread-

  2. #12
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    I find that dining out tends to save my grocery bills.

  3. #13
    Senior Member jimrckhnd's Avatar
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    One thing I do to cut down is learn to braise, stew and make soups. The method is easy and forgiving, makes lots of food and since you use cheap cuts of protein and vegetables and often beans (think Navy Bean, Split Pea, soup). You can take two pounds of chuck, a bag of beans and make enough chilie to feed you for a couple of weeks off and on (these dishes freeze well too).
    Never underestimate the power of stupid people in large groups

  4. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by dala View Post
    Think of it as price per meal rather than price per unit weight. Your frozen pizza will provide about two meals, but if you take that meat and mix it with some potatoes and vegetables into a shepherd's pie, that's about six or eight meals for maybe twice the price.
    Quote Originally Posted by Randomnity View Post
    yeah, pricing it per weight makes zero sense, unless either nutrition or the amount of food you consume in a day is determined purely by weight (hint: they aren't).
    I don't want sound like I have something against you two because I don't. I think the suggestions you've given are great and on any normal day, you can find me following them. But for argument's sake, I still think TV dinners put up a very strong fight which makes me sad. I do think price per weight is a valid argument given that sheppard's pie is a TV dinner staple. The same argument can probably be made for chilli and rice, spaghetti and meat balls or whatever cheap and efficient meal megacorp likes to put in TV dinners. I will note that you can't compare pizza to sheppards pie because they are nutritionally different like you mentioned. Also pizza from my shopping experience has a less efficient price per weight ratio so it will lose.

    So allow me to entertain you with a homemade sheppard's pie versus TV dinner.
    Recipe for sheppard's pie.

    The recipe calls for:
    Ground Lamb or Beef: 1 lb
    Frozen Green Peas: 1/2 cup
    Carrots: 1/4 cups, chopped
    Onion: 1 medium, chopped
    Garlic: 1 clove, diced
    Worcestershire Sauce: 2 tbsp (or replace it with your favorite steak sauce)
    Potatoes: 4 medium, peeled and sliced
    Onion Spring: 1 tbsp, chopped
    Cream Cheese: 1-2 tbsp
    Milk: 1-2 tbsp
    Butter: 2-3 tbsp
    Vegetable Oil: 1 tbsp
    Salt
    Pepper

    I'm going to give you all the ingredients for free except the peas, carrots, potatoes and beef because any decent kitchen should have the majority of that stuff or you're a starving student and don't care about taste. Also those ingredients don't really add that much sustenance. So lets start pricing it out.

    Ground beef on sale for most places I've lived goes for $5 on sale. I realise that certain central states get this for $2-3 in which case frozen foods at my pricing loses out. I'm going to replace the peas and carrots with whatever bag of frozen veggies. We will use half a bag or 0.5 lbs which costs us $1. Potatoes almost universally go for 99 cents a pound. Lets be extra cheap and use more than the recipe calls for. The average weight of a potato is about 13 oz? So the recipe calls for 3.25 lbs but lets add an extra 2 potatoes and call it 5 lbs because we're dirt cheap and starving.

    So total price and weight of our fresh sheppard's pie comes to 6.5 lbs or 104 oz for $11 which on any regular day, would make me a very happy camper.

    But that's 10.57 cents to the oz compared to my 8.8 cents to the oz TV dinner. So in the end its about a $2 savings.

    For the heck of it, lets compare it to my beloved frozen pizza. If you stay away from the delicious thin crust stuff, you can get a kg of frozen pizza for $5 or 14.2 cents per oz. Gasp! That's excessive luxury.

    Concluding Remarks
    TL;DR i know...

    TV dinners can provide equal sustenance at a similar or lower price than even the most efficient home cooked meals. When we now consider that the only remaining trade off is time saved vs home cooked tastiness and nutritional value, I think I have a right to feel sad. If anything I just empathize with all the obese people.

    Quote Originally Posted by The Ü View Post
    I find that dining out tends to save my grocery bills.
    Brilliant! Combine with dash and dine and you're set!

  5. #15
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    Compare canned and frozen vegetables and see which ones are cheaper. Surprisingly sometimes it's the frozen, but often it's the canned. You could buy a dozen eggs, a large (fresh) onion, a can of spinach, and a block of cheese (grate it or cut it yourself, cheaper) and have very tasty and nutritious omelets for a week. Just portion out a small amount of spinach each, and keep it in a ziplock or tupperware-type container in the fridge.

    What everyone has said about oatmeal, beans, and rice is also extremely true. I think it's always a good idea to keep packages of the regular ramen (the 19 or 25 cent kind you cook, not the shitty kind in the cup...you pay more for lower quality if you buy the styrofoam cup noodles) for "emergencies" (read:when you run out of other food). Peanut butter on bread also has plenty of protein, and soups are great.

    If you can cook (and like to cook, because this takes hours, bro), I have a magnificent recipe for borscht which will last you for days and days, and is packed with nutrients because it's primarily a vegetable soup with some meat (or you can even skip the meat to make it cheaper or vegetarian).

    Hamburger is good to stock up on too like people have said because you can make casseroles out of it. That is, if you eat meat.

    I'd well advise you to learn to cook beans or bean soups from dry beans, because that's incredibly cheap, and mainly you need an onion, maybe some garlic, and other spices, salt and pepper blah blah blah.

  6. #16
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    Oh, I also want to pass on that apparently you can get complete nutrition from potatoes and full-fat milk in a pinch. It's actually smarter to buy a bag of potatoes, a gallon of milk, and some butter than it is to try to strictly live off of ramen. I found this article about Irish people living off of this, and it's not advisable to do for long stretches of time, but I think it's better than a ramen-only diet, nutritionally speaking. Of course you have to eat the potato skin to get all of the nutrients.

    Throw in some beans and rice and you're all set.

    EDIT: or rather, throw in some oatmeal and you're all set. I found this article and though it's not the original one I read, it contains the necessary information on milk and potatoes as a diet staple

  7. #17
    meinmeinmein! mmhmm's Avatar
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    get a job in the dining hall. they feed you for free.
    every normal man must be tempted, at times,
    to spit on his hands, hoist the black flag,
    and begin slitting throats.
    h.l. mencken

  8. #18

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    Nabemono.
    Hot pot
    Stew

    Stuff like that...

  9. #19
    meinmeinmein! mmhmm's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by wolfy View Post
    i always eat nabeyaki udon for lunch. so tasty.
    my favourite from nobu's:
    every normal man must be tempted, at times,
    to spit on his hands, hoist the black flag,
    and begin slitting throats.
    h.l. mencken

  10. #20

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    I almost lived on nabe when I first came to Japan and was single. Had the same nabe a few days, just topped it up. Delicious!!

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