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  1. #61
    Anew Leaf
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    Quote Originally Posted by JAVO View Post
    I don't think that kit is intended for squidiform organisms, but I'm sure you'll find a good place to put them.
    when we take over the world you will look back upon this post and think "how foolish was i?"

  2. #62
    Senior Member giegs's Avatar
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    Need to borrow my copy of How to Have Sex in the Woods? Luckily the mechanics remain the same, so there's not much to learn. Just remember the wet wipes!


    I took the z30 on its maiden voyage a couple days ago canyoneering Little LO just outside of town. I hadn't done it before and had no idea what to expect, just wanted to give the pack a workout. Ended up being a long hike, with a little bit of insanely cold water and some jedi aid climbing to avoid actually having to do anything difficult. The pack carries like a dream. Vastly better than any others I own. On the approach I didn't notice it at all and was carrying most of our heavy gear. Through the canyon it showed to be a lightweight, I wore a through small holes in it downclimbing chimneys and the like, but it obviously isn't intended for this use. The adjustment straps really cinch loads down well so there's no noticeable slop when moving around and the expansion is exceptional. I won't be bringing it down a slot again since it wouldn't last long and I've got more appropriate bags, but this is definitely my new goto lightweight daypack/overnight bag.

  3. #63
    Don't pet me. JAVO's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by giegs View Post
    Need to borrow my copy of How to Have Sex in the Woods? Luckily the mechanics remain the same, so there's not much to learn. Just remember the wet wipes!
    Ha ha! They should include a copy of that in the Intimacy Kit!

    Quote Originally Posted by giegs View Post
    I took the z30 on its maiden voyage a couple days ago canyoneering Little LO just outside of town. I hadn't done it before and had no idea what to expect, just wanted to give the pack a workout. Ended up being a long hike, with a little bit of insanely cold water and some jedi aid climbing to avoid actually having to do anything difficult. The pack carries like a dream. Vastly better than any others I own. On the approach I didn't notice it at all and was carrying most of our heavy gear. Through the canyon it showed to be a lightweight, I wore a through small holes in it downclimbing chimneys and the like, but it obviously isn't intended for this use. The adjustment straps really cinch loads down well so there's no noticeable slop when moving around and the expansion is exceptional. I won't be bringing it down a slot again since it wouldn't last long and I've got more appropriate bags, but this is definitely my new goto lightweight daypack/overnight bag.
    That looks like a nice pack. My main warm weather pack is similar in size and material. I'm impressed yours held up to canyoneering with only a few small holes.

  4. #64
    On a mission Usehername's Avatar
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    A few of my favourites that one might not think to pack their first times out:

    Sleeping bag compression sack:

    It shrinks my synthetic sleeping bag down to a fraction of the size using basic physics.

    'beaners:

    Because you don't have to fit it all in your bag.

    Headlamp:

    Because you're going to fall in love with your headlamp if you've never used one. Make sure it has a red light setting so if you need to go to the bathroom in the middle or the night or look for something in your pack you can fall back asleep easier.

    Top-loading rather than compartmentalized pack:
    I like top loading packs because I'm spatially dumb and it provides less jenga puzzle piecing--and therefore less stress for me--than compartmentalized packs. You may like compartmentalized packs but I hated mine when I lived out of it for almost a year. I now use this one from MEC (think REI):
    *You don't have a soul. You are a Soul. You have a body.
    *Faith is the art of holding on to things your reason once accepted, despite your changing moods.
    C.S. Lewis

  5. #65
    Don't pet me. JAVO's Avatar
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    ^ I especially like the red light and top loading pack tips.

    Red lights are great for not completely blinding yourself and others once the eyes have dark-adapted (red affects the retina's low-light receptors less). It's annoying when people are talking around the fire and shine their white headlamp into your face constantly. To retain some of your night vision when you either have to use a light at all, or switch from red to white, cover or close one eye. When you turn the light off or back to red, the covered eye will still be mostly dark-adapted. Full dark-adaptation takes about 30-40 minutes.

  6. #66
    likes this gromit's Avatar
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    Cool I did not know about red light and night vision.
    Your kisses, sweeter than honey. But guess what, so is my money.

  7. #67
    Don't pet me. JAVO's Avatar
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    Default Winter footwear

    This is what I used in WV this past February in the Cranberry Wilderness. Temps were down to around 15 F (-9.5 C) at night, and probably as low as 18-20 F when around camp and hiking. Snow varied from 0-30 inches (0-76.2 cm) (unexpected postholing up to the hips is always a blast).

    • Certain Dri antiperspirant used daily on feet for 2-3 days before trip
    • Injinji polyester toe socks
    • Thick Thorlos wool socks
    • Rocky GoreTex socks, size 12
    • non-waterproof trail runners size 10.5
    • Montbell stretch gaiters


    Observations:

    1. Toes got cold while doing camp chores, so cold that I was getting concerned and nearly stopped everything to warm them. They probably would have been ok if I had oversized my trail runners 1-2 sizes. The shoes were tight enough (due to thick socks) that they were restricting blood flow slightly, making my toes cold. I normally wear size 10-10.5 with thin socks.

    2. GoreTex socks worked well in keeping my feet reasonably dry. I'll skip the foot antiperspirant next time and see how things go.

    3. GoreTex socks got wet when I crossed a small stream which was deeper than I estimated. Water came in from the top: user error. For deep streams, I plan to remove all socks and cross in only the shoes.

    4. I need better gaiters for snow. The tiny gaiters served no purpose, and my lower pants were wet the entire trip--just a mild annoyance.

    5. I did not like the feel of the polyester toe socks after a day of hiking. They felt like damp polyester concrete.

    This winter I plan to revise the system to:

    • Polyester dress sock liner (or maybe polypro)
    • Thick wool socks
    • Thick wool socks, oversized
    • Rocky GoreTex socks, size 12
    • non-waterproof trail runners, size 12 wide
    • Real waterproof gaiters
    • Softshell pants instead of regular nylon hiking pants


    I estimate that I'll use this down to 0 F (-17.8 C). (I also hope to see -40 (C/F) this winter, but I'll be using an entirely different system for that.)

  8. #68
    likes this gromit's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by JAVO View Post
    This is what I used in WV this past February in the Cranberry Wilderness. Temps were down to around 15 F (-9.5 C) at night, and probably as low as 18-20 F when around camp and hiking. Snow varied from 0-30 inches (0-76.2 cm) (unexpected postholing up to the hips is always a blast).

    • Certain Dri antiperspirant used daily on feet for 2-3 days before trip
    • Injinji polyester toe socks
    • Thick Thorlos wool socks
    • Rocky GoreTex socks, size 12
    • non-waterproof trail runners size 10.5
    • Montbell stretch gaiters


    Observations:

    1. Toes got cold while doing camp chores, so cold that I was getting concerned and nearly stopped everything to warm them. They probably would have been ok if I had oversized my trail runners 1-2 sizes. The shoes were tight enough (due to thick socks) that they were restricting blood flow slightly, making my toes cold. I normally wear size 10-10.5 with thin socks.

    2. GoreTex socks worked well in keeping my feet reasonably dry. I'll skip the foot antiperspirant next time and see how things go.

    3. GoreTex socks got wet when I crossed a small stream which was deeper than I estimated. Water came in from the top: user error. For deep streams, I plan to remove all socks and cross in only the shoes.

    4. I need better gaiters for snow. The tiny gaiters served no purpose, and my lower pants were wet the entire trip--just a mild annoyance.

    5. I did not like the feel of the polyester toe socks after a day of hiking. They felt like damp polyester concrete.

    This winter I plan to revise the system to:

    • Polyester dress sock liner (or maybe polypro)
    • Thick wool socks
    • Thick wool socks, oversized
    • Rocky GoreTex socks, size 12
    • non-waterproof trail runners, size 12 wide
    • Real waterproof gaiters
    • Softshell pants instead of regular nylon hiking pants


    I estimate that I'll use this down to 0 F (-17.8 C). (I also hope to see -40 (C/F) this winter, but I'll be using an entirely different system for that.)
    For day hikes or multi-day hikes?
    Your kisses, sweeter than honey. But guess what, so is my money.

  9. #69
    Don't pet me. JAVO's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by gromit View Post
    For day hikes or multi-day hikes?
    I use this for both, although I'd remove one pair of wool socks if temps were warmer than 15-20F.

  10. #70
    Senior Member giegs's Avatar
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    Why are you wearing runners in those conditions? I'm all about wearing my inov8s with some gaiters when it's decent out, but once it's consistently below freezing I've got a proper pair of boots on. My Scarpa SL M3s would be a minimum there. Generally I've got a genuine mountaineering boot on... If I'm really out there a plastic boot or Nepal Evo.

    Not a judgement, I just don't think of runners for winter use unless I'm actually running.

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