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  1. #51
    likes this gromit's Avatar
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    I moved the tent to the top which made some difference, tightened in the order you suggested, still wasn't great, so then I just started trying to tighten stuff more... tightened the shoulder straps and hip belt up a TON, so now the pack is riding a lot higher. Seems much better on my shoulders. I think I want to readjust where the shoulder straps connect to the frame, move it down one notch if possible...

    Weird long torso not so great in this situation...
    Your kisses, sweeter than honey. But guess what, so is my money.

  2. #52
    On a mission Usehername's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by gromit View Post
    Oh I am female. How should it be different for female? I believe the pack is a female pack though at least.
    Quote Originally Posted by JAVO View Post
    I'm curious now about the differences. I haven't heard of this, other than a difference in preferred sternum strap height.
    Basically females should load the weight to their hips as much as possible, and wear the hip strap across the pelvis rather than bellybutton-ish height. The most important difference is to avoid carrying weight above your hips as much as possible, so you'll want to move your tent to the bottom unless you have heavier items like canned food there already.

    The first backpacking trip I went on, a guy loaded it for me and it felt like a sturdy pack but I was very sore afterwards. I thought it was just from the workout. The next time my female friend showed me how to do it, and it felt like an extension of my body/like it complemented my skeletal frame. I did not feel wrenched after that trip.

    Basically, males have upper body muscle and skeletal support, which females basically don't, almost at all, at least in comparison to the kind of weight and skeletal frame support they have in their hips and lower body.
    *You don't have a soul. You are a Soul. You have a body.
    *Faith is the art of holding on to things your reason once accepted, despite your changing moods.
    C.S. Lewis

  3. #53
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    Ah well I had the tent in the back to begin with then moved it to the top, that was better... I'll have to see about how to attach it below the pack somehow. Fortunately I'm only packing everything up to go on the commuter rail and get picked up somewhere to go car camping, not actually hiking with all of it, but I just was curious because even the 0.5 mi walk to the subway this morning was killing my shoulders.
    Your kisses, sweeter than honey. But guess what, so is my money.

  4. #54
    Senior Member giegs's Avatar
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    If you're not used to carrying a pack a lot of shoulder issues can result from improper form. I see hundreds of relatively "green" hikers every year and almost all of them walk with either shrugged or slacked shoulders to start. Both are recipes for discomfort when you've got a moderate+ load and a longish hike. Since I don't have birthin' hips I can't speak to the fit so much, but the general rules of packing weight low and towards the spine should still apply. Packed and fitted properly, it should seem as though the load is propelling you forward. And again, at some level it's just comfort and technique. Once you get used to carrying monster loads on weird terrain without crying the little ones feel dreamy.

    The width of the shoulder straps (relative to each other, not the individual strap width) might also be an issue. If you've got the option try moving them inwards or outwards to find your sweet spot.

    I just picked up a Gregory z30 for a few trips I have planned this winter. Gave away my old TNF pack to a friend and needed something in the 30L size for light/fast shenanigans. An earlier model got Alpinist Magazine's recommendation, so it shouldn't suck. Hopefully it'll be waiting for me when I head home next week. My Wild Things pack needs to go in for repairs... so beat up right now.

  5. #55
    Don't pet me. JAVO's Avatar
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    Default Condensation in shelters: no big deal

    One night during heavy rain from hurricane Irene, I was dripped on all night by condensation in my Tarptent Moment when not using the inner liner. (I only use it in colder weather.) I didn't even notice until I woke up and saw little droplets on my down bag. My bag has great DWR (durable water repellent coating). I simply shook them off and packed the bag. The down inside stayed dry. Areas where I hike are nearly a temperate rainforest, so I expect to get condensation most nights, even with an open pitch flat tarp. I think the condensation issue is nearly irrelevant unless you use a bag with poor DWR or the shelter is so small that your bag is touching the walls.

  6. #56
    Senior Member giegs's Avatar
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    Yup. In most tents is not an issue unless they heavily condensate and "rain" on your when you wake up and the tent shakes. If you're in a bivy sack, especially a poleless bodybag style one, it can be a fairly big issue.

    How do you like the moment? I've been thinking about a tarptent for my next 1 man instead of getting a Big Agnes seedhouse or similar. I've heard concerns about general durability, but it seems the kind of tent that would easily be damaged if not sited/set properly. How well does it handle wind?

  7. #57
    Don't pet me. JAVO's Avatar
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    I like the Moment. It seems a little "space-challenged" when I have the liner installed because that takes up 2-4 inches of headroom. I've only used it in forested areas, but in my more open backyard it held up very well to 20-30 mph winds. I've read firsthand accounts from others who haven't had any problems in much stronger winds on exposed mountains. It definitely needs the extra stakes/guylines on the main pole (not included), which is the vulnerable point of these center pole designs. For really high winds and snow loads, there are mid-panel tieouts which I'll stake out to supporting sticks or trekking poles. There's an extra pole available, but this accomplishes the same support for less weight and money. I do plan to give it a try this winter in the forest or behind spruce tree clusters. I also have a Scarp 2 which is much better suited to winter, but it weighs 4 lbs, 4 oz (after I added extra features).

    A photo from the Tarptent website:



    My Moment weighed 2 pounds new, and it weighs 2 lbs, 6 oz (including stakes, not counting the 4 oz liner) after:

    - seam sealing
    - coating of diluted silicone caulk on both sides of the floor to minimize slipperiness of silnylon (also enhances durability and waterproofing)
    - added small pieces of cord to zipper pulls
    - added extra guylines and stakes

    A Scarp 1 would be a really nice one person tent for winter, but it starts at 3 lbs before these enhancements. It's all so luxurious compared to the trash bag bivy I used as a teenager!

    I've thought about using only this Basic Bivy made of breathable Tyvek-like material:


  8. #58
    Don't pet me. JAVO's Avatar
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    Everyone likes to talk about survival kits and first aid kits. But, if you're out backpacking with your spouse, significant other, or somehow meet a significant other while on the trail (), you're going to need this to be fully prepared:



    This is stuff you won't learn by watching Survivorman or Man vs. Wild folks!

  9. #59
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    Quote Originally Posted by JAVO View Post
    Everyone likes to talk about survival kits and first aid kits. But, if you're out backpacking with your spouse, significant other, or somehow meet a significant other while on the trail (), you're going to need this to be fully prepared:



    This is stuff you won't learn by watching Survivorman or Man vs. Wild folks!
    But where will I put all of my tentacles?

  10. #60
    Don't pet me. JAVO's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Saturned View Post
    But where will I put all of my tentacles?
    I don't think that kit is intended for squidiform organisms, but I'm sure you'll find a good place to put them.

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