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  1. #31
    reborn PeaceBaby's Avatar
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    Do you use one of these?

    "Remember always that you not only have the right to be an individual, you have an obligation to be one."
    Eleanor Roosevelt


    "When people see some things as beautiful,
    other things become ugly.
    When people see some things as good,
    other things become bad."
    Lao Tzu, Tao Te Ching

  2. #32
    Senior Member giegs's Avatar
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    I've used the older model (only has "ok" "help" and "911") for work. Handy way of checking in or letting people know you're in trouble without the hassle of a satellite phone. Used it once to get a helicopter. They knew exactly where we were, it was just a matter of finding/making a suitable landing site.

    On personal trips, I'll sometimes carry one, but have never used it to check in or anything. I've got mixed feelings about them. They could save your life if you get in a jam and they could help you make decisions you wouldn't otherwise. Mixed bag, especially when the point is to be "out there".

  3. #33
    Don't pet me. JAVO's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by PeaceBaby View Post
    Do you use one of these?

    I've been seriously considering one of those, or renting a sat phone for trips.

  4. #34
    reborn PeaceBaby's Avatar
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    ^ I did some web contract work for a SAR agency - this or another PLB might be a good investment safety-wise. I know, it undermines the thrill of risk a little, but if faced with a dire situation (and hopefully, this will never be the case) but if, it would obviously be invaluable. Those SAR guys wish more people would take precautions I think.

    And be careful out there!



    "Remember always that you not only have the right to be an individual, you have an obligation to be one."
    Eleanor Roosevelt


    "When people see some things as beautiful,
    other things become ugly.
    When people see some things as good,
    other things become bad."
    Lao Tzu, Tao Te Ching

  5. #35
    Senior Member giegs's Avatar
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    I should have been more clear... The theme of reliance on technology resulting in accidents in outdoor settings is really noticeable in accident reporting. Rather than using good judgement and prudence, people use their gizmos as an excuse to be reckless. Knowing (or thinking, more accurately) that rescue is the press of a button away changes things massively.

    Not that I'm fully against em, just don't like the way the things sometimes make people behave.

  6. #36
    reborn PeaceBaby's Avatar
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    @giegsyes, the flip side of the coin too - thanks for adding that, there are always pros and cons to technology, isn't there? I was thinking about that too as I typed my other post up ... I wonder how many accidents are happening because people are taking too great a risk, trusting technology to save them no matter what?
    "Remember always that you not only have the right to be an individual, you have an obligation to be one."
    Eleanor Roosevelt


    "When people see some things as beautiful,
    other things become ugly.
    When people see some things as good,
    other things become bad."
    Lao Tzu, Tao Te Ching

  7. #37
    insert random title here Randomnity's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by JAVO View Post

    Living for days with only minimal gear and food carried on the back and obtaining water directly from its natural source allows one to:

    • Exercise with variable intensity and ranges of motion not typically experienced on gym equipment or flat walking/running
    • Temporarily remove ourselves from modern society, culture, technology, and even people if desired
    • Encounter new experiences and challenges not encountered in everyday life
    • Refocus on the essentials of life
    • Understand the primitive ways of our ancestors and other cultures
    • See firsthand how all of life depends on nature and the Earth
    • Direct, personal interaction with nature teaches a respect for it in the same way which direct, personal interaction with another person enhances respect for that person
    • Ingest worms that "can do bad things like migrate to the brain and eat brain tissue."
    Fixed your post.

    *stays far,far away from wilderness areas*
    -end of thread-

  8. #38
    Don't pet me. JAVO's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by PeaceBaby View Post
    ^ I did some web contract work for a SAR agency - this or another PLB might be a good investment safety-wise. I know, it undermines the thrill of risk a little, but if faced with a dire situation (and hopefully, this will never be the case) but if, it would obviously be invaluable. Those SAR guys wish more people would take precautions I think.
    I don't see it as eliminating the thrill of risk because if something happens that causes me to push the SOS button, things are probably pretty bad. If lost and uninjured in the areas I hike in, I'd be able to find my way to a frequently-traveled road or phone, if not back to the trailhead I started from. That would be different in a few places out west, Alaska, or Canada which are more vast and remote. A Spot or similar device would be great if I were critically injured though, or if I encountered someone else who was. My friends and family would enjoy the Google Maps progress tracking, although I'd probably turn it on briefly every 1-2 hours to conserve power.

    That's another good point about using SAR resources and adding risk and burden to them when a simple device would allow them to nearly skip the search phase. I know about that well because I was on a ground SAR team as a cadet in the Civil Air Patrol when I was a teen. My main focus was SAR and survival training.

    Quote Originally Posted by giegs View Post
    I should have been more clear... The theme of reliance on technology resulting in accidents in outdoor settings is really noticeable in accident reporting. Rather than using good judgement and prudence, people use their gizmos as an excuse to be reckless. Knowing (or thinking, more accurately) that rescue is the press of a button away changes things massively.

    Not that I'm fully against em, just don't like the way the things sometimes make people behave.
    Great point. I've always had that perspective too. Just a few weeks ago I was with a group backpacking in a wilderness area, and one person hiked far ahead of the group (mistake 1). He made a wrong turn (mistake 2). His only map was the one on his phone (mistake 3), which ran out of battery power. He tried to charge it with a solar charger, but couldn't because of the forest and the cloudy day. The trip leader distributed paper maps at the beginning of the trip, but he didn't take one. He ended up coming out at the wrong trailhead out of 5 possible trailheads. We were at the right one, so we sent a car to look for him at the most likely one. He wasn't there, and a couple who had just come out there hadn't seen him. He headed back in the direction he had came from, but had no idea which way to go. Fortunately, he sat down to wait and think about the situation. Other hikers with a map came along and told him which way to go. Three of us walked back in without packs hoping to find him, but we encountered him walking our way already about 1 mile in. If we had been unable to find him after walking back to the trail junction where he made a wrong turn, we planned to notify the rangers of the missing hiker and leave it up to them.

    Quote Originally Posted by Randomnity View Post
    Fixed your post.

    *stays far,far away from wilderness areas*

  9. #39
    Senior Member giegs's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by JAVO
    I don't see it as eliminating the thrill of risk because if something happens that causes me to push the SOS button, things are probably pretty bad. If lost and uninjured in the areas I hike in, I'd be able to find my way to a frequently-traveled road or phone, if not back to the trailhead I started from. That would be different in a few places out west, Alaska, or Canada which are more vast and remote. A Spot or similar device would be great if I were critically injured though, or if I encountered someone else who was. My friends and family would enjoy the Google Maps progress tracking, although I'd probably turn it on briefly every 1-2 hours to conserve power.
    But it really can diminish the thrill. Every single piece of technology you bring into the wilds has this capability.

    Reinhold Messner - The Murder of the Impossible

  10. #40
    Don't pet me. JAVO's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by giegs View Post
    But it really can diminish the thrill. Every single piece of technology you bring into the wilds has this capability.

    Reinhold Messner - The Murder of the Impossible
    I think it's a subjective thing which varies in individual preferences. Navigating using a GPS diminishes the thrill for me, but others view it as if it were a simple map. For me, something which weighs as much as a small digital camera, and can be ignored, yet bring a quick rescue is worth the tiny technological imposition. I bring at least a small digital camera too, if not even larger camera equipment.


    Here's an account of two SPOTs failing after a fatal climbing accident. Very bad timing.

    I'm also considering a Personal Locator Beacon (PLB). It doesn't have the status updates, but it uses the government satellites, which are more numerous than the commercial ones SPOT uses. Here's a brief overview of the differences. This looks like a great PLB. SPOT's status updates make things more complicated and introduce a possibility of miscommunication when someone interprets the lack of OK messages as a sign of needing rescue.

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