User Tag List

First 1234 Last

Results 11 to 20 of 60

  1. #11
    Protocol Droid Athenian200's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    MBTI
    INFJ
    Enneagram
    4w5
    Posts
    8,828

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by senza_tema View Post
    Financial concerns aside, who wants to deal with the misery of having to take care of a huge house? Thanks, but no thanks.
    People who live like that usually hire maids, too.

  2. #12
    Senior Member Bamboo's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    MBTI
    XXFP
    Posts
    2,706

    Default

    I work for estate sales and I regularly see huge homes stuffed - really packed - with so much that people don't use at all. I don't really understand this. People just accumulate.

    I'm working on downsizing everything I own, in part because I just don't want stuff, and because I'm working on new living arrangements.

    The "largest" things I own, relatively weighted by cost/weight/volume/importance are:

    - car (i like cheap practical cars but may need something larger for work, i do most my own work to save a lot of $$$)
    - tools and related storage items (generally heavy, need organization, take up space, important because I like them, used to make money, used to save money)
    - clothing and storage items (bulky, need organization)
    - bed
    - furnishings (just need basics but comfort is important, i also like a lot of lighting)
    - storage/desk/work space
    - kitchen and bath
    - computer
    - cell phone
    - toys: camera, bikes, etc. (bike(s) need storage space)

    I can't think of much else I'd want. I don't want a lot of glitz and glam but I do want quality.

    I'm also undergoing a "miniturization" process for my tools (and everything else) - a way to store them in less space and ideally in a way that makes them more portable. Better for work, better for moving, better for storage, means I need less space meaning less costs over my head.

    Most importantly, the extra money goes toward the stuff I really want to do - wandering, trying new stuff, enjoying life. Not toward supporting some massive footprint I don't want to have anyway.
    Don't know how much it'll bend til it breaks.

  3. #13
    ^He pronks, too! Magic Poriferan's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    MBTI
    Yin
    Enneagram
    One sx/sp
    Posts
    13,908

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Jenaphor View Post
    There was mention of 8 rooms. Do you mean bedrooms? If not, that might be 4 bedrooms, two bathrooms, living room and dining room which isn't that large. If they plan to have children within the next few years, it would make sense to buy this size of home.
    I just mean 8 rooms, plus the basement and attic. I know that's not real big. I'm one of four kids, and my parents and three of us lived a while in a house of comparable size minus the attic. There was an even shorter period where my sister in-law and infant nephew lived there, too. For that case, the house was much too small. But when I visited after all of us moved out, it suddenly seemed so big. Nice, but excessive for only two people. I know that size of house is basically standard, but that's part of my point. I noted that kids make a big difference, but for those who don't have kids I hardly see the need for that to be commonplace.

    Quote Originally Posted by Jenaphor View Post
    But I do agree that overextending yourself isn't practical. For sure, three vehicles for two individuals is too much particularly with the amount of income they're jointly earning. Now double their salary and we're talking another ballgame. Even then, while they can afford it, why have the third vehicle unless it's a bike or if they're into camping, an RV.
    I admit the van can be really convenient. The truck they inherited and perhaps they don't know how to sell it. Before the truck they had two sedans, and after a rather long time they did sell one of those.

    Quote Originally Posted by Jenaphor View Post
    Okay, so there are no children in the future. Any idea when they purchased the home? If it was purchased at the lowest real estate point during and post the sub-prime craziness, when people were being foreclosed, it might have been an excellent investment opportunity. Same goes for the non-residential property.
    I don't really know exactly when. It was before 2006, though. What's also odd is that it's my would-be sister in-law's home, which she got before she even met my brother. I'm pretty sure her dad helped her get it initially, I don't think she could have purchased it on her own. But when it only had one person in it, that's even stranger.

    Quote Originally Posted by Jenaphor View Post
    But since vehicles are substantially depreciating assets, not worth the initial cost (cash, loan or lease and interest), annual insurance and all maintenance costs. Get rid of one vehicle and their overextension might be partially alleviated.

    Poor cash flow management.
    I think I'll ask them if they're going to sell that truck.

    Quote Originally Posted by senza_tema View Post
    Financial concerns aside, who wants to deal with the misery of having to take care of a huge house? Thanks, but no thanks.
    This is topical as well, because the woman of the house groans often about having to clean the place and gnashes her teeth of its filth and dishevelment.
    Go to sleep, iguana.


    _________________________________
    INTP. Type 1>6>5. sx/sp.
    Live and let live will just amount to might makes right

  4. #14
    nee andante bechimo's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Posts
    8,023

    Default

    If the house was purchased in 2006, that's a scary time since it was during the boom. Wonder if they're upside down on their mortgage. If so, they can't sell unless the real estate market goes up. The first few years invested in a home with 10 - 25% down means that most of her mortgage payments went to paying the interest with barely any towards the principal.

    Ouch. They're in a bad place. They should sell the truck and see if they can't get some kind of consolidation loan if they also have credit card and other debt.

  5. #15
    Senior Member Stigmata's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    MBTI
    INTP
    Enneagram
    5w4
    Posts
    1,353

    Default

    This is admittedly a pretty large assumption on my part here, but I think people that shell all their of money into developing this pseudo-lavish lifestyle by splurge spending are trying to attain that traditional, americanized ideology of success of having the big house, big cars, ect, and thus view their possessions of an extension of themselves and a testament to their ability and overall worth. It's all materialistic nonsense, and most of the time these people have given little thought as to whether this lifestyle is sustainable in the long-term.

  6. #16
    Carerra Lu IZthe411's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    MBTI
    INTJ
    Posts
    2,591

    Default

    It's hard to peg everyone's situation to them being gluttons. A home is a great investment, and sometimes multiple cars are necessary. 3 seems excessive for 2 people, though.

    There's usually other indicators that come along with the big crib and phat rides to give you an indication of someone who is materialistic.

  7. #17
    Courage is immortality Valiant's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    MBTI
    ENTJ
    Enneagram
    8w7 sx/so
    Socionics
    EIE
    Posts
    3,919

    Default

    Excess and waste are really not a nice things. I don't like tying myself up to things I can barely afford.
    Like the sponge says, it's nicer to have a smaller place, just one or two cars, and indulge in good things rather than just waste it all on stuff you don't need.

    Mightier than the tread of marching armies is the power of an idea whose time has come

  8. #18
    ^He pronks, too! Magic Poriferan's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    MBTI
    Yin
    Enneagram
    One sx/sp
    Posts
    13,908

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by YourLocalJesus View Post
    Excess and waste are really not a nice things. I don't like tying myself up to things I can barely afford.
    Like the sponge says, it's nicer to have a smaller place, just one or two cars, and indulge in good things rather than just waste it all on stuff you don't need.
    Well, I probably would spend it on things that I don't need. But the key difference from the big house or the third car is that I would be spending it on something that I appreciate. It's one thing to go beyond necessity and into luxury. It's another thing to purchase things you appreciate too little to rationally want.
    Go to sleep, iguana.


    _________________________________
    INTP. Type 1>6>5. sx/sp.
    Live and let live will just amount to might makes right

  9. #19
    Senior Member chachamaru's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    MBTI
    ENFP
    Enneagram
    ?
    Socionics
    EXPP
    Posts
    451

    Default

    I would do anything to live in a city with decent public transportation and get rid of our cars!!!

    I want to live small, yet comfortably.
    a cat is fine too

  10. #20
    the Dark Prophet of Kualu
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    MBTI
    RAD
    Posts
    860

    Default

    We (five people) live in a four room apartment. Having a house with 8 rooms is really huge.

    I haven't read the thread. - actually I did after a while.

    If I had an income that large, I would invest it in building/growing/whatever a small company that sells whatever I do, hire an assistant to take care of most of the work for me: preferably from the middle east/asia - they're cheap and I could pay more than their market "win-win", and then relax around the globe and do things that I wish to do. Why I haven't yet: Bad self-confidence, don't "understand" the world, not sure of what to sell and depressed but other than that I should be able to do it within a year or two.

    However, I've noticed that most people think like you but when they get the chance of having that little extra income, which isn't a Boom Bang here's the money - going from 11/hr to 150/hr, you'll have the cellphone already paying just earlier and then you have that car and you realize you want a bigger house cause you lived there so long and blah blah blah. Life happens, it puts you in a habit and suddenly you get just a tiny bit more money to spend, after a while you don't have time to spend it so why not put it into going somewhere where you can feel it just a tiny bit? Shopping on saturdays, random stuff, things you see: cool I accumulate stuff. I don't even notice that there's A LOT MORE STUFF but there's new stuff all the time so it feels like it always did. That thing you always wanted as a kid but never got etcetera.

    there's a book I'd urge you to read; http://www.fourhourworkweek.com/

    It's plain lovely.

    Kills normalcy.
    Open for interpretation.
    Jo
    Fell for the temptation: Nohari / Johari

Similar Threads

  1. INTJ seems more literal than ISTJ?
    By The Ü™ in forum Myers-Briggs and Jungian Cognitive Functions
    Replies: 5
    Last Post: 05-20-2009, 03:33 PM
  2. The Human Mind - the sum of its parts or something more?
    By Geoff in forum General Psychology
    Replies: 6
    Last Post: 05-15-2007, 06:14 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
Single Sign On provided by vBSSO