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  1. #11
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    I've heard fruit cake is the ultimate backpack food, but I don't know anyone who actually likes it.
    I like to bring Lipton Soup packets to sprinkle on fresh fish caught in streams. I also do the salmon and tuna thing JAVO mentioned on crackers or pita if you want to be healthy.

    I don't know why but I almost always start craving oranges by day 3, so I often take a few oranges or tangerines because they don't bruise easily.

    Canned food is a definite no-no . . . my mom packed 75 lbs of canned food for my first backpack trip (I was 18) . . . it was miserable!

  2. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by Risen View Post
    If I had to I'd just use a campfire, ya know, the kind you make on the earth that burns wood :P . Don't know what it is with people and camping stoves. Carrying them is more inconvenient than knowing how to make a safe fire, and just setting it up when you get to camp. It seems almost foolish for people to be camping/backpacking and not even know how to make a fire without a stove (not saying you don't, but in general). And if i needed to, I could boil water in the couple of cans I'll be bringing, as I mentioned above. Shouldn't be an issue though because it'll be in a more or less developed campsite with spring water for drinking. Otherwise I'd bring a water filter.
    That's cool, as long as you have something planned that's fine. I just wouldn't want anyone getting caught unprepared if I can help giving them a heads up, especially when with something so important as water. The reason many climbers prefer stoves vs campfires is because there is no wood available above the tree line and many climbers like to practice "leave no trace behind" where the only thing thats noticably effected is snow, no trees or brush is used and anything packed in is also packed out (including human waste)

  3. #13
    Don't pet me. JAVO's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Risen View Post
    If I had to I'd just use a campfire, ya know, the kind you make on the earth that burns wood :P . Don't know what it is with people and camping stoves. Carrying them is more inconvenient than knowing how to make a safe fire, and just setting it up when you get to camp.
    In many frequently used campsites, suitable wood is sometimes difficult to find unless you start to collect it and carry it the last 1/4-1/2 mile before camp. Often, you don't know that you're only 1/4 mile from camp though. I really like campfires, but I also find myself hiking until after dark or sleeping in (being the night owl I am). As long as a little extra weight isn't an issue (on a difficult or long trail), it's nice to have a light stove to heat up some boiling water for oatmeal, hot chocolate, instant soup, or rice. I bring it along sometimes. Stove + stand + windscreen weighs around 2-3 oz. and fits inside the smallest pots. I made a Penny stove from Heineken beer cans. It burns denatured alcohol, and around 2/3 oz will boil 2 cups of water (6-8 minute cook time). I also made a double-wall "woodgas" (BushBuddy clone) from tin cans and a few other items which weighs around 6 oz.

    From my backpacking trip last fall:



    Quote Originally Posted by Windigo View Post
    I don't know why but I almost always start craving oranges by day 3, so I often take a few oranges or tangerines because they don't bruise easily.
    It might be vitamin C deficiency. Chewing on some pine or other similar coniferous tree needles might help. Or, steep them in hot water to make a tea if you don't like that "I just ate the family Christmas tree" taste.



    Edit: Advantage of wood stove over a fire:
    1. Easier containment, less scarring of ground, often can be used where no fires are allowed
    2. More efficient use of the wood and heat
    3. Burns twigs to thumb-sized wood, which is much easier to find and get burning
    4. Easy and stable pot support
    Last edited by JAVO; 07-23-2010 at 05:14 PM. Reason: added explanation of wood stove advantages over just a fire, since the stove is added weight to carry

  4. #14
    Strongly Ambivalent Ivy's Avatar
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  5. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by JAVO View Post
    It might be vitamin C deficiency. Chewing on some pine or other similar coniferous tree needles might help. Or, steep them in hot water to make a tea if you don't like that "I just ate the family Christmas tree" taste.
    Yeah, my kids got pretty mad the last time I ate the Christmas tree! Actually I learned about the pine needles AFTER I had stopped backpacking.

    I WILL DO IT AGAIN!!!!

  6. #16
    don't fence me in sui generis's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Windigo View Post

    Canned food is a definite no-no . . . my mom packed 75 lbs of canned food for my first backpack trip (I was 18) . . . it was miserable!
    Ouch.

    I'm trying to think of what I brought with me when I went last summer for three days. The main thing I can remember is that I brough hard-boiled eggs, which last signficantly longer sans refrigeration than you'd think. 2 or 3 days, I can't remember.
    Murphy Brown: What is it with us? Why can't we take the easy road once in awhile?
    Avery Brown: Because it's boring and dishonest and uncomfortable, like wearing a pair of shoes all day that pinch your feet.

    approx 55% ES, 90% TJ

  7. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by Windigo View Post
    I've heard fruit cake is the ultimate backpack food, but I don't know anyone who actually likes it.
    I like to bring Lipton Soup packets to sprinkle on fresh fish caught in streams. I also do the salmon and tuna thing JAVO mentioned on crackers or pita if you want to be healthy.

    I don't know why but I almost always start craving oranges by day 3, so I often take a few oranges or tangerines because they don't bruise easily.

    Canned food is a definite no-no . . . my mom packed 75 lbs of canned food for my first backpack trip (I was 18) . . . it was miserable!
    Canned food can't be your main food source, obviously, due to waste of weight and space, but a couple of cans doesn't matter so much.

    How the heck did she pack 75 pounds of canned food into your backpack?

  8. #18
    Don't pet me. JAVO's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ivy View Post
    Thanks Ivy!

    ...except, I'm actually trying to be a less well-fed backpacker.

  9. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by JAVO View Post
    In many frequently used campsites, suitable wood is sometimes difficult to find unless you start to collect it and carry it the last 1/4-1/2 mile before camp. Often, you don't know that you're only 1/4 mile from camp though. I really like campfires, but I also find myself hiking until after dark or sleeping in (being the night owl I am). As long as a little extra weight isn't an issue (on a difficult or long trail), it's nice to have a light stove to heat up some boiling water for oatmeal, hot chocolate, instant soup, or rice. I bring it along sometimes. Stove + stand + windscreen weighs around 2-3 oz. and fits inside the smallest pots. I made a Penny stove from Heineken beer cans. It burns denatured alcohol, and around 2/3 oz will boil 2 cups of water (6-8 minute cook time). I also made a double-wall "woodgas" (BushBuddy clone) from tin cans and a few other items which weighs around 6 oz.

    From my backpacking trip last fall:




    It might be vitamin C deficiency. Chewing on some pine or other similar coniferous tree needles might help. Or, steep them in hot water to make a tea if you don't like that "I just ate the family Christmas tree" taste.



    Edit: Advantage of wood stove over a fire:
    1. Easier containment, less scarring of ground, often can be used where no fires are allowed
    2. More efficient use of the wood and heat
    3. Burns twigs to thumb-sized wood, which is much easier to find and get burning
    4. Easy and stable pot support
    Yes, I can see the rationale behind carrying a fuel stove when going to places where you know there wont be a lot of wood. But in places where there is plenty of the stuff, there's no reason not to burn it. Seriously, nothing tastes better than some fresh meat cooked over a natural fire made with natural wood. It's barbecue HEAVEN. Plus a stove just isn't going to give you a large, light giving fire when you need it. It has some merits in convenience, but it's not necessary, imo. And I'm really not buying into the whole "scorched earth = forever ruined" mantra considering how CA's environment operates, thriving best when the forests and chaparral are renewed by wildfires. Fire existed LOOOONG before man did (I know we all know this). The only thing the cavemen succeeded in doing was making fire "convenient".

    Even so, maybe I'll play along and bring a large coffee can with some holes in the bottom... to burn wood.

  10. #20
    Don't pet me. JAVO's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Risen View Post
    Yes, I can see the rationale behind carrying a fuel stove when going to places where you know there wont be a lot of wood. But in places where there is plenty of the stuff, there's no reason not to burn it. Seriously, nothing tastes better than some fresh meat cooked over a natural fire made with natural wood. It's barbecue HEAVEN. Plus a stove just isn't going to give you a large, light giving fire when you need it. It has some merits in convenience, but it's not necessary, imo. And I'm really not buying into the whole "scorched earth = forever ruined" mantra considering how CA's environment operates, thriving best when the forests and chaparral are renewed by wildfires. Fire existed LOOOONG before man did (I know we all know this). The only thing the cavemen succeeded in doing was making fire "convenient".
    I agree completely. Well-said.

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