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  1. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by oberon View Post
    You should publish the results of a functional test... chop through some broom-handle-sized saplings, or maybe a ham, and evaluate how well it did.
    [YOUTUBE="U8DcwH1fMbw"]Kukri vs Bowie knife[/YOUTUBE]

    Large ceremonial kukri vs. cow *Not for the squeemish*

    Crazy Kukri


    I think the kukri's usefulness beyond ordinary knife and machetes probably comes into play when you need to work with harder wood, such as dry oak. The extra weight and hardness of the blade would make it much more suitable to chopping something like that, whereas something like a bowie would have difficulty getting through, and take more damage ESPECIALLY if you needed to baton it.

    Plus, you can't make a tomahawk/axe/machete do this:

    [YOUTUBE="0DHGlhFJH0g"]Kukri vs. kitchen tasks *everything is butter*[/YOUTUBE]

  2. #22
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  3. #23
    Senior Member Phoenix_400's Avatar
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    Never really messed with a Kukri. I've had a couple of tomahawks and bowie knives though.

    A good E-tool goes a long way. I posted the cold steel shovel in the hiking gear thread on here. Just don't ever buy the USGI tri-fold one. Its highly effective at a lot of things, but it uses screw caps to lock the joints. As great as that is for getting it into different configurations, its painful if you're not watching that they stay tight and the damn thing collapses on your hand.

    I grew up carrying my Great Uncle's issue navy knife and a machete (that Mom used to cut the heads off chickens when she was a kid on the farm) whenever I went in the woods. Had to retire the machete and switched up to a Cold Steel Bolo. Here's that combo:


    Nowadays, my woods blades are that CS shovel (w/ the edges sharpened up a bit) and a 5" Kabar. Need to add a little skateboard grip tape to the shovel handle though, the finish makes it a little too slick.

    I also have my 'Triforce of Power'. If I'm wearing pants, I have these on me. Doesn't matter if I'm in a business suit, shorts, or jeans. These are great for more delicate field work.

    Kershaw Blur, Leatherman Wave, Surefire E1L Outdoorsman

    One of my mechanic friends picked up a blur off the Matco truck and was showing it off to me. I reached into my pocket and pulled out the same one I've been carrying for 6 years. He didn't realize he'd bought the same model as me. Best damn folder I've ever owned. He agrees, so much so that he bought a couple more as gifts for his brothers.
    "People in glass houses shouldn't use Windex when living near bird sanctuaries."- myself

    "We are never alone my friend. We are constantly in the company of victories, losses, strengths and weaknesses. Make no mistake, life is war...and war is hell. Those who fight the hardest will suffer the most...but that's what you have to do: Fight. As long as you're feeling pain, then there's hope...because only the dead do not suffer." -RD Metcalf
    [SIGPIC][/SIGPIC]

  4. #24
    Senior Member Willfrey's Avatar
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    Bow Saw.
    Indespensible for being in the wild. Think of it as a poor-mans chainsaw.



    You can get the vareity that comes without the bow (like a thin razor-wire type blade with pull handels at the end) if you are space saving.

    These will break down smaller round branches/timber much faster than trying to use an axe trust me. You can even cut down small trees relatively easily with a bow saw if you mimic the same kind of cuts you'd normally do with a chainsaw.

    And Oberon: That is awesome, my dad had that blue hatchet and I used it when growing up! Was great for hatchet-throwing contets.

    EDIT: found a pic of the Wire Hand-Saw, should be pretty obvious how they work:
    ...Then I ducked my head and the lights went out, and two guns blazed in the dark;
    And a woman screamed, and the lights went up, and two men lay stiff and stark...

  5. #25
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    Update:

    I used that kukri to chop up my Christmas tree for firewood and kindling. It was easy as hell to delimb. Chopping through the trunk was also pretty smooth, though heavy with sap ofc.

  6. #26
    figsfiggyfigs
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    Freaking great thread!

    I'm more of a switch blade sort of gal though... I'm still doing some research on which is the best to get.

  7. #27
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    I prefer my kukri, although I'm yet to try it in a more heavy duty setting.

  8. #28
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    What type of kukri is it?

  9. #29

  10. #30
    Senior Member Bamboo's Avatar
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    This thread is all over the place, so I might as well add:

    I like Opinels for a cheap, sharp, simple pocket folders that I won't feel bad about losing or abusing. They weigh very little.

    Supposedly one of the most common pocket knives on the planet.

    I had a number 8 Opinel with the standard handle and the carbon steel blade. About $12. It has a convex edge so you need to sharpen it on a softish surface, such as a computer mousepad - it didn't take long to make it very sharp with some progressively finer grit sandpaper. The blade had to be maintained (oil). The steel imparted an unpleasant taste to wet foods, like fruit. It was a great utility knife until I lost it.

    I replaced it with a number 8 with a walnut handle and stainless blade. Not quite as sharp, but no rust to worry about. I keep that one in my tool bag.

    For other uses, keep in mind they make them in various sizes. They make huge ones for batoning and little ones for your pocket. They aren't really choppers, more slicers.

    opiknife.com has worked for me.


    I think Estwing axes are excellent, but heavy. They advertise their solid steel shanks in their hammers and axes. Indestructible, and sharpen well. You can get them at Home Depot (in the tool aisle with the hammers, not by the garden tools) - they still look the quality they used to be. They make a mid-sized camp axe that is a good tradeoff between a hatchet and a full handle. I have a hatchet I got at an estate sale. Otherwise ~30 bucks.
    Don't know how much it'll bend til it breaks.

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