User Tag List

First 678

Results 71 to 76 of 76

Thread: Hiking gear

  1. #71
    Buddhist Misanthrope Samvega's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    MBTI
    ENTP
    Enneagram
    7w8
    Posts
    1,068

    Default

    If you want a great tent, REI half dome FTW! I know a ton of people that have it and love it!

    As for the pack, load yours up with 45 pounds, hike 5 miles at 9,000 feet, wait a week and I'll let you do the same with mine, end of story. I have used many packs from cheap Big-5 $50 HiTech stuff to $500 Arcterix and there is a HUGE DIFFERENCE!

    Some good deals on wool at sierratradingpost, I got a 100% wool hoodie on ebay for $23 shipped so I'm pretty happy with that.

    As for boots, I hate gortex and so on, Norwegian welt stitched leather is the only way to go, my boots could do the AT twice where as you'd need 4 pairs of anything else. Sometimes you can't beat a flawless design, in this case, or at least when I bought them, Meindl was making those boots in Germany on the same lasts they had been using for hundreds of years. I don't care what price tag you toss on a boot, made in China is made in China.

  2. #72
    Permabanned
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    MBTI
    ISTP
    Enneagram
    9w8
    Posts
    3,187

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Samvega View Post
    If you want a great tent, REI half dome FTW! I know a ton of people that have it and love it!

    As for the pack, load yours up with 45 pounds, hike 5 miles at 9,000 feet, wait a week and I'll let you do the same with mine, end of story. I have used many packs from cheap Big-5 $50 HiTech stuff to $500 Arcterix and there is a HUGE DIFFERENCE!

    Some good deals on wool at sierratradingpost, I got a 100% wool hoodie on ebay for $23 shipped so I'm pretty happy with that.

    As for boots, I hate gortex and so on, Norwegian welt stitched leather is the only way to go, my boots could do the AT twice where as you'd need 4 pairs of anything else. Sometimes you can't beat a flawless design, in this case, or at least when I bought them, Meindl was making those boots in Germany on the same lasts they had been using for hundreds of years. I don't care what price tag you toss on a boot, made in China is made in China.
    Yea, I've heard bad things in regards to goretex and its breathability. However, I've used my black on black columbia boots hiking for over 10 miles on scorching hot earth/rock on 90F+ days and they really did not give me a single issue. They have a waterproof membrane that's virtually the same as goretex spec wise. My feet got pretty warm in all the heat, but with synthetic socks it doesn't cause blisters or any other issues. The shoes were a lot more comfortable in that regard than my old payless hikers which would become scorching hot inside the shoe in those conditions, causing significant discomfort.

    All the synthetic and mesh materials that hiking/backpacking boots tend to use nowadays for lower weight and breathability work well for that purpose. It's certainly not as durable as an old fashioned type of heavy boot, but it's a tradeoff. I'd much prefer hiking long distances in a lighter boot that gives me just as much protections and functionality as a welt stitched boot even though it may not last quite as long. And there is where price becomes an issue, because I can certainly see that generally the more expensive the boot (regardless of type), the more durable and functional it'll be.

  3. #73
    Don't pet me. JAVO's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Posts
    6,050

    Default

    Really all gear is unnecessary for hiking and backpacking. We only use it due to either lack of skill or desire for convenience.

    I like wool for winter. A found a few merino and 100% virgin wool sweaters at the thrift store for a $3-$5 each. One has a few moth holes, but it still keeps me warm. They don't wick away sweat quickly like synthetics such as polyester fleece do, but this also makes them warmer due to reduced evaporative heat loss. When they get wet with sweat, I just remove them, shake them out, and put them back on. Because I couldn't find anything used in my size, I did splurge on some new $80 Big Bill brand wool/nylon blend pants which work great.

    I very seriously considered the Seedhouse SL1-3. Overall, it's a great tent. Like any tent, it has weaknesses. The main ones which made me decide against it (just on personal preference) are:

    1. Small vestibule which allows snow or rain to fall inside tent when door is opened or closed. (Fix: Just be fast and clean up.)

    2. Headroom for sitting up is basically limited to the center of the tent, and the walls slope inwards some. (Fix: Get a size larger for more room.)

    I ended up getting both a Tarptent Scarp 2 and a Golite Shangri-La 3. I wanted a tent I could use either by myself or with 1-2 of my kids. The Scarp partially resolves the confining space feeling by having more vertical walls, but I still felt a little cramped when sharing the tent. The Shangri-La 3 definitely wins in the interior space category, with room to sleep three (barely), and flexible configuration and weight options (bug netting vs. none and floor vs. none). The Scarp has several things to fiddle with to get it pitched just the way you want it for the conditions, but these can sometimes make it seem a bit fiddly. After spending a mild rainy night in the Shangri-La 3 this spring and two fair nights in the Scarp 2 this past week, I'm leaning toward the Shangri-La 3 as my preferred tent. These tents are heavier and more expensive than many lightweight tents designed for less extreme conditions. I wanted a tent I could use in winter and in heavy snow and wind. The Shangri-La 3 used to be called the Hex 3, and these are sometimes available used.

    I find the Exped Downmat 7 very comfortable, but heavy (2 lbs for full length). It's also very warm. Some like the Neoair as much or better, but it's only good down to around 40F or so. A Ridgerest foam pad is great if that will be comfortable enough. For $20, it's worth trying out. Any pad will make great hammock insulation.

  4. #74
    Permabanned
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    MBTI
    ISTP
    Enneagram
    9w8
    Posts
    3,187

    Default

    Boot review: Salomon Mission GTX

    Video Product Description!

    Salomon Mission GTX® Autobahn/Dark Clay-X/Black - Zappos.com Free Shipping BOTH Ways

    Ok, so I got my new hiking boots last week, and got to try them out in some of the most rugged conditions they'll face while on my feet. I have to say, Salomon seems to make a damn good shoe . Fit wise, they seem much better than the Columbia boots so far in that they accommodate my wider feet, and give me all the toe room i need. I hate cramped toes . The length inside is great enough such that my toes NEVER hit the edge, thank you God. No more dead toenails for me. That is how a size 14 should fit, negating the need for me to find some elusive size 15 shoe.

    Design wise, it's great. I really have to say that going downhill in these was effortless compared to using my previous boots. I think they have great pronation control and good ankle support. The grip is solid. The build seems pretty durable, but only time can tell. I did notice one of the laces was already showing some signs of wear, though it might be because I stepped on it previously :/. The midsole and insole provide quite a bit of shock absorption, more than my Columbia boots. Jumping around on loose rocks and steep inclines with these boots was easy. They're light as a feather at only 20 oz, an oz less than the Columbia boots while having a sturdier outsole and better shock absorbtion. Only thing is I noticed my right heel was taking pressure from the back of the boot, though I surmise it was because I had the right one laced too tight.

    The goretex didn't make them very sweaty, certainly no worse than Columbia's waterproof membrane. I only got to test them in cloudy 70sF conditions though. As far as waterproofing goes, I did cross a stream with these bad boys and found them to do well in keeping water out, until reaching that critical "over the top point." Like any goretex boot, they take a long time to dry out after a good soaking. A very long time... Goretex/waterproof boots are useful when its raining or you will be going through shallow water. Anything deeper than that and you'll want some water shoes or sandals.

    All in all, these are awesome boots that I'd definitely take backpacking/world traveling in any conditions. When these wear out I can see myself getting a second pair.

  5. #75
    Artisan Conquerer Halla74's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    MBTI
    ESTP
    Enneagram
    7w8 sx/so
    Socionics
    SLE
    Posts
    6,927

    Default

    Magnum Boots Ion-Mask series kick ass, they are very light and comfortable.
    For everyday wear they are great, I don't know about hiking though.

    Magnum Boots
    --------------------
    Type Stats:
    MBTI -> (E) 77.14% | (i) 22.86% ; (S) 60% | (n) 40% ; (T) 72.22% | (f) 27.78% ; (P) 51.43% | (j) 48.57%
    BIG 5 -> Extroversion 77% ; Accommodation 60% ; Orderliness 62% ; Emotional Stability 64% ; Open Mindedness 74%

    Quotes:
    "If somebody asks your MBTI type on a first date, run". -Donna Cecilia
    "Enneagram is psychological underpinnings. Cognitive Functions are mental reasoning and perceptional processes. -Sanjuro

  6. #76
    Permabanned
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    MBTI
    ISTP
    Enneagram
    9w8
    Posts
    3,187

    Default

    Hi-Tec is the only company making ion mask hiking boots right now. I REALLY wanted to try out the technology, but the majority of boots they have with ion mask are made far below my size -_-.

Similar Threads

  1. top gear
    By TickTock in forum Popular Culture and Type
    Replies: 36
    Last Post: 08-23-2015, 07:06 AM
  2. Top Gear
    By 6sticks in forum Arts & Entertainment
    Replies: 5
    Last Post: 09-16-2012, 06:12 PM
  3. Metal Gear Solid Characters
    By Sling in forum Popular Culture and Type
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 06-23-2008, 01:21 AM
  4. Hiking
    By JAVO in forum Home, Garden and Nature
    Replies: 21
    Last Post: 01-17-2008, 12:02 AM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
Single Sign On provided by vBSSO