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  1. #11
    Senior Member matmos's Avatar
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    Dandylions are rich in iron and Vitimin 2. Mixed with the requisite proportion of brambles, they make a fine tea, which can be used as a tincture that acts as an antidote for wasp stings. Ironically wasps are rich in both vitimin 2 and iron.

    Eat more wasps.

  2. #12
    Reason vs Being ragashree's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tiltyred View Post
    Spinach! It has more iron than meat.
    Agh, no, definitely NOT!

    Why? Spinach may be high in iron, but is also extremely high in oxalic acid, which actually inhibits iron absorbtion by binding to it. Iron that the body can't use isn't going to do you any good. Too much spinach consumption may even cause the defficiency to worsen because of this effect. Almost anything else high in iron is better in this respect than spinach, that includes other green leafy vegetables, which are also a good source.

    Yeast extracts are also very high, and completely vegetarian if that's an issue - but where do you live? It's mostly in the Uk and Antipodes they're popular I believe.
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  3. #13
    likes this gromit's Avatar
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    I thought if you eat it with something like OJ then it helps to absorb the iron better... maybe like the vitamin C or something?
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  4. #14
    Reason vs Being ragashree's Avatar
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    I know that vitamin C can increase iron absorbtion. I can't see that making any difference to spinach though, as it wouldn't affect the process which makes spinach problematic as an iron source, which is that of the oxalic acid binding to the iron, making it unavailable. Orange juice is also relatively high in oxalic acid itself. It may help most to take orange juice, other high vitamin C foods, or vitamin C supplements a little before a meal, especially if it's something high in iron, as this will promote absorbtion when you do consume the iron. Actually it won't make so much difference with other vitamin C sources, but I can see it helping most with orange juice if there's a slight gap.
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  5. #15
    ¡MI TORTA! Amethyst's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by bananatrombones View Post
    Dandylions are rich in iron and Vitimin 2. Mixed with the requisite proportion of brambles, they make a fine tea, which can be used as a tincture that acts as an antidote for wasp stings. Ironically wasps are rich in both vitimin 2 and iron.

    Eat more wasps.
    Oh dear god! I want wasps to be extinct!!! They serve no environmental purpose as far as I know. :eek:

  6. #16
    Senior Member ThinkingAboutIt's Avatar
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    Eggs are great. Believe it or not, quinoa is a complete protein and has a lot of iron along with other heart healthy goodies. Try this: Nutrition facts, calories in food, labels, nutritional information and analysis – NutritionData.com
    Just because you can doesn't mean you should.

  7. #17
    Senior Member Synapse's Avatar
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    yeah i can agree with eggs though sometimes i can taste the chemicals in the eggs really strongly and can't eat them. i buy bread with added iron, its not much but it helps. my pallets seems to disagree with eating red meat. i ate some when i went out with my friends but went home and felt so ill i brushed the taste out of me. still spinach dose indeed have a lot of iron.

    eating liver paste from pork, chicken and other meats would probably have iron.



    Doesn't feel like meat then, more like cheese funnily enough.

  8. #18
    Senior Member cafe's Avatar
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    One of my biology profs once said that cooking spinach and/or eating it with vinegar helped to break down the oxalic acid. If you eat a lot of it raw, it can also interfere with the absorption of calcium and give you kidney stones.
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  9. #19
    Senior Member ThinkingAboutIt's Avatar
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    I just noticed that you can get specific info there too - check this out:
    http://www.nutritiondata.com/foods-0...0000000-w.html
    Just because you can doesn't mean you should.

  10. #20
    Senior Member ThinkingAboutIt's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by tawanda View Post
    Hmm...I like cheerios!


    I actually didn't at first think it was an iron deficiency. At first I thought CFS, but pretty much everyone in my life that has seen me eat (including my dietitian mother) and has said that *symptom* is probably caused by *shitty eating habit*. I, for the most part, never really bought it, until recently when I just crashed. I slept for 8 hours one night, got up, left the house for some breakfast, came back home, and slept all day. Got up around 8 PM, then went to bed a couple hours later. I'm still incredibly fatigued, and I've tried everything to fight it (exercise, B vitamins, regular sleep pattern etc.), except eat more iron.

    Usually I'm just tired all the time, but I fight it off by just telling myself it's nothing or drinking 5 hour energies. There are more reasons, but they're mostly woman reasons that could be the cause, and I've done everything for that too (I'm actually going in to see my OBGYN to up the dosage on my pill). That might not be anything, per say, but it could compliment the problems that I'm already having making them more severe.

    I don't know what else it could be.
    A friend of mine was talking about these same things and said she was tested for a vitamin D deficiency and was low. Within a week of taking supplements, she said it was amazing, she felt like a whole new person with all her 'old' energy back.
    Just because you can doesn't mean you should.

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