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  1. #11
    Was E.laur Laurie's Avatar
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    Their coop:


    Eggs they got:



    This was a chicken that just showed up at their house one day. Would look through the basement windows. It was hilarious.


  2. #12
    Senior Member cafe's Avatar
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    Nice coop and eggs! I am pretty sure the INTP won't be doing much beyond brief heavy lifting, but it's possible I could convince my ISTP dad to help with something. His motto is 'If you use a tool once, it's paid for itself.'

    I guess word got out where the nice digs were!
    “There are two novels that can change a bookish fourteen-year old’s life: The Lord of the Rings and Atlas Shrugged. One is a childish fantasy that often engenders a lifelong obsession with its unbelievable heroes, leading to an emotionally stunted, socially crippled adulthood, unable to deal with the real world. The other, of course, involves orcs.”
    ~ John Rogers

  3. #13
    Was E.laur Laurie's Avatar
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    That was her only chicken. They built the coop for it after it decided to start looking in their windows. It adopted them I guess.

  4. #14
    Senior Member cafe's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Elaur View Post
    That was her only chicken. They built the coop for it after it decided to start looking in their windows. It adopted them I guess.
    Wow. Nice family and smart bird.
    “There are two novels that can change a bookish fourteen-year old’s life: The Lord of the Rings and Atlas Shrugged. One is a childish fantasy that often engenders a lifelong obsession with its unbelievable heroes, leading to an emotionally stunted, socially crippled adulthood, unable to deal with the real world. The other, of course, involves orcs.”
    ~ John Rogers

  5. #15
    Reason vs Being ragashree's Avatar
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    Rhode Island reds are a good breed too, they're one of the best backyard general purpose breeds if you can get proper stock these days. They're tough, good foragers, healthy, and usually pretty friendly when treated properly, as well as being one of the most productive laying breeds of all (they're still used as a parent breed for the modern laying hybrids, I believe). The eggs are brown though, I prefer that personally, though I know not everyone likes it. They're big and can defend themselves better than most breeds too, which may help with the dog problem. They can be used for meat too, but they're long lived, a good pet breed and excellent layers, so eating them seems unnecessary unless you have more than you know what to do with. I personally think they look pretty nice too, here are some ladies:
    Look into my avatar. Look deep into my avatar...

  6. #16
    Senior Member cafe's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ragashree View Post
    Rhode Island reds are a good breed too, they're one of the best backyard general purpose breeds if you can get proper stock these days. They're tough, good foragers, healthy, and usually pretty friendly when treated properly, as well as being one of the most productive laying breeds of all (they're still used as a parent breed for the modern laying hybrids, I believe). The eggs are brown though, I prefer that personally, though I know not everyone likes it. They're big and can defend themselves better than most breeds too, which may help with the dog problem. They can be used for meat too, but they're long lived, a good pet breed and excellent layers, so eating them seems unnecessary unless you have more than you know what to do with. I personally think they look pretty nice too, here are some ladies:
    Pretty and I never thought I'd say this about a chicken, but there is a gleam of intelligence in those eyes. I think around here people pay extra for brown eggs. Long-lived is good. My youngest son is already asking me how long chickens live.
    “There are two novels that can change a bookish fourteen-year old’s life: The Lord of the Rings and Atlas Shrugged. One is a childish fantasy that often engenders a lifelong obsession with its unbelievable heroes, leading to an emotionally stunted, socially crippled adulthood, unable to deal with the real world. The other, of course, involves orcs.”
    ~ John Rogers

  7. #17
    Reason vs Being ragashree's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by cafe View Post
    Pretty and I never thought I'd say this about a chicken, but there is a gleam of intelligence in those eyes. I think around here people pay extra for brown eggs. Long-lived is good. My youngest son is already asking me how long chickens live.
    I think laying hens typically do about 5 or six years, maybe quite a bit longer if you're lucky and they're well cared for, which isn't too bad as chickens go, particularly considering they're almost egg laying machines for a lot of that period. They do indeed seem quite bright for chickens too, I know they usually recognise their owners and familiar people and distinguish them from strangers. That may be a problem if there are a lot of strangers around, but probably not so much with hens which are more docile anyway. I don't imagine a cock would go down so well in suburbia!
    Look into my avatar. Look deep into my avatar...

  8. #18
    Senior Member prplchknz's Avatar
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    I would love to keep a chicken, I have a balcony I wonder if I could fit a chicken coop on it, but i don't know if i have room honestly, but fresh eggs are so amazing. I should convince my parents to get a chicken they have room.plus it doesn't get as cold where they live.
    In no likes experiment.

    that is all

    i dunno what else to say so

  9. #19
    Senior Member cafe's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ragashree View Post
    I think laying hens typically do about 5 or six years, maybe quite a bit longer if you're lucky and they're well cared for, which isn't too bad as chickens go, particularly considering they're almost egg laying machines for a lot of that period. They do indeed seem quite bright for chickens too, I know they usually recognise their owners and familiar people and distinguish them from strangers. That may be a problem if there are a lot of strangers around, but probably not so much with hens which are more docile anyway. I don't imagine a cock would go down so well in suburbia!
    I think 5-6 years would be just about perfect, since my boy is going to be 12 before I even start, assuming I do.

    We definitely can't have a rooster unless some silent breed exists. We don't even live in suburbia, or rather, this suburb got swallowed up by urban sprawl fifty years ago.

    Quote Originally Posted by prplchknz View Post
    I would love to keep a chicken, I have a balcony I wonder if I could fit a chicken coop on it, but i don't know if i have room honestly, but fresh eggs are so amazing. I should convince my parents to get a chicken they have room.plus it doesn't get as cold where they live.
    I am pretty sure it'd be possible to keep a chicken in an apartment with a balcony. You'd probably need something like a small rabbit hutch, I think.



    This one is cute, but ungodly expensive:
    “There are two novels that can change a bookish fourteen-year old’s life: The Lord of the Rings and Atlas Shrugged. One is a childish fantasy that often engenders a lifelong obsession with its unbelievable heroes, leading to an emotionally stunted, socially crippled adulthood, unable to deal with the real world. The other, of course, involves orcs.”
    ~ John Rogers

  10. #20
    Senior Member prplchknz's Avatar
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    yeah but we already have a grill and a flower bed in which the dog uses as his bathroom, especially in the winter when its too cold for him to go on walks, that's the down side of owing a chiuaua mix. they're not allowed outside when it's below 35f.
    In no likes experiment.

    that is all

    i dunno what else to say so

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