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  1. #21
    Sugar Hiccup OrangeAppled's Avatar
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    I'm picky about sauerkraut. Can never find one as good as my late Grandpa's. It was not totally "sour".

    I notice when it's bad, it's really bad

    What is the flavor of other fermented fruits & veggies (besides cabbage)?
    Often a star was waiting for you to notice it. A wave rolled toward you out of the distant past, or as you walked under an open window, a violin yielded itself to your hearing. All this was mission. But could you accomplish it? (Rilke)

    INFP | 4w5 sp/sx | RLUEI - Primary Inquisitive | Tritype is tripe

  2. #22
    Senior Member countrygirl's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Alwar View Post
    Yes, the reviewers of his book whine about him being gay. I don't care though. It's on my to read list.

    I do have Sally Fallon's book!


    Fermented foods is an acquired taste if you have not been raised with it. It took awhile for me to enjoy Kefir (blended with fruit usually mango) and my husband will not go near anything that is soured milk (except bland cheddar cheese).

    I'm interested in how your experiments go, especially when you eat it.

    This links to United Nations article about preserving local fermented foods before they become extint by commericalization.

  3. #23
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    I don't care for sauerkraut either, but I like kimchi.

  4. #24
    Don't Judge Me! Haphazard's Avatar
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    For the longest time I hated pickles, and at the deli the pickles always came with sauerkraut, so I avoided the kraut too. But then somehow I tried the kraut about a year ago and now I'm addicted.

    To hell with being raised on it. I was raised on shit and I don't eat that anymore.
    -Carefully taking sips from the Fire Hose of Knowledge

  5. #25
    The Architect Alwar's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by OrangeAppled View Post
    I'm picky about sauerkraut. Can never find one as good as my late Grandpa's. It was not totally "sour".

    I notice when it's bad, it's really bad

    What is the flavor of other fermented fruits & veggies (besides cabbage)?
    So far other than cabbage I've tried peppers, cucumbers, onions and carrots (in the same jar) and they taste exactly how I imagined they would with cabbage as a reference. Check out the second video I posted, it's very easy to experiment with and only takes four days or longer if you prefer.

  6. #26
    Senior Member MonkeyGrass's Avatar
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    Your title is killing me!

    I've done kombucha tea, kefir, fermented grains, and one very failed attempt at sauerkraut. I need a new kefir grain and kombucha scoby, as ours went south after my daughter was born last year, and I never replaced them. I've got 3 heads of cabbage in my fridge now, waiting for another go, actually (last time, I didn't add any water, and despite claims that it doesn't need it, I think it's the best idea). I love kimchi, too!

    I'm actually in the middle of reading Wild Fermentation. A good read! Ridiculous that people would disregard such good info because of his sexual orientation.
    I think I think more than you think I think.

  7. #27
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    My paternal grandfather was born in south-central Pennsylvania of straight-up Pennsylvania German stock, and from him I inherited both my surname and my native cuisine. As a teen I helped him and my father make sauerkraut, which was made according to the following method:

    You will need:

    1. Fresh heads of cabbage.
    2. Several pounds of salt.
    3. A five-gallon earthenware crock.
    4. A kraut stomper.
    5. A good-sized (say, grapefruit-sized) rock.
    6. A dinner plate.
    7. A cotton cloth big enough to cover the top of the crock.
    8. A cabbage slicer (alternately, a large knife and cutting board).

    A kraut stomper is the long wooden implement on the left. The cabbage slicer is the rectangular doodad on the right:



    The sauerkraut is prepared as follows:

    Shred the cabbage by slicing the heads into slices 1/8th of an inch (3mm) wide, more or less. The slices will fall apart by themselves into piles of shredded cabbage. Layer the shredded cabbage in the crock. When it's about an inch deep, shake a goodly amount (two handfuls) of salt over the cabbage, and start crushing the cabbage with the stomper. You want to use enough force to bruise the shreds and bring out the juice. When you start to see froth forming as you work, you know you are doing it right.

    Continue adding layers of cabbage and salt, stomping as you go. You will know that the amount of salt is right if you taste it and the salinity reminds you of seawater... it should be that salty. The stomping process will mix the cabbage; this is fine, it's part of the process.

    When the crock is full or you've run out of cabbage (whichever comes first), move the crock to a cool, dark location. Lay the dinner plate on top of the cabbage (yes, right in the juice) and put the rock on the plate. Drape the cloth over the whole affair and leave it alone for six weeks to two months.

    After the fermentation is complete, remove the cloth cover, the plate, and the rock. The top layer of sauerkraut may be discolored due to any number of reasons, usually due to drying. Sometimes mold may form on the top of the kraut. Do not be concerned about this, but simply skim the top layer away with a large spoon and discard it. It's of no more import than mold on the rind of a cheese.

    The remainder is genuine home-made sauerkraut, suitable for serving with roast pork and mashed potatoes, or topping a bratwurst in a bun. It may be home-canned or frozen, and keeps very well either way... or you can just store it in the crock there in the basement, where the natural lactic acid will continue to act as a preservative. We preferred to freeze ours.

    -der maus

  8. #28
    Senior Member countrygirl's Avatar
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    Where can you buy a kraut stomper?

  9. #29
    Oberon
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    Quote Originally Posted by countrygirl View Post
    Where can you buy a kraut stomper?
    I don't know, but you can make a reasonable substitute by sawing about a half-inch off the big end of a clean wooden baseball bat... just enough to square off the end. The business end is a little small, but it will work.

    EDIT: Or you can hit Lehman's website and buy one there!

    Home Goods

  10. #30
    Phantonym
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    Excellent thread title, Alwar! Fermented foods have always been a part of my family's diet. We've never used vinegar for cucumbers.

    Concerning making sauerkraut, my family has always added cumins during the process.

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