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  1. #1
    Senior Member FeatheredFrenzy's Avatar
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    Default Healthiest foods

    I thought this might be a useful topic, but didn't see it anywhere.

    The 11 Best Foods You Aren’t Eating


    Maybe you should be eating more beets, left, or chopped cabbage.

    (This post was originally published on June 30, 2008, and recently appeared on The New York Times’s list of most-viewed stories for 2009.)

    Nutritionist and author Jonny Bowden has created several lists of healthful foods people should be eating but aren’t. But some of his favorites, like purslane, guava and goji berries, aren’t always available at regular grocery stores. I asked Dr. Bowden, author of “The 150 Healthiest Foods on Earth,” to update his list with some favorite foods that are easy to find but don’t always find their way into our shopping carts. Here’s his advice.

    1. Beets: Think of beets as red spinach, Dr. Bowden said, because they are a rich source of folate as well as natural red pigments that may be cancer fighters.
    How to eat: Fresh, raw and grated to make a salad. Heating decreases the antioxidant power.

    2. Cabbage: Loaded with nutrients like sulforaphane, a chemical said to boost cancer-fighting enzymes.
    How to eat: Asian-style slaw or as a crunchy topping on burgers and sandwiches.

    3. Swiss chard: A leafy green vegetable packed with carotenoids that protect aging eyes.
    How to eat it: Chop and saute in olive oil.

    4. Cinnamon: May help control blood sugar and cholesterol.
    How to eat it: Sprinkle on coffee or oatmeal.

    5. Pomegranate juice: Appears to lower blood pressure and loaded with antioxidants.
    How to eat: Just drink it.

    6. Dried plums: Okay, so they are really prunes, but they are packed with antioxidants.
    How to eat: Wrapped in prosciutto and baked.

    7. Pumpkin seeds: The most nutritious part of the pumpkin and packed with magnesium; high levels of the mineral are associated with lower risk for early death.
    How to eat: Roasted as a snack, or sprinkled on salad.

    8. Sardines: Dr. Bowden calls them “health food in a can.” They are high in omega-3’s, contain virtually no mercury and are loaded with calcium. They also contain iron, magnesium, phosphorus, potassium, zinc, copper and manganese as well as a full complement of B vitamins.
    How to eat: Choose sardines packed in olive or sardine oil. Eat plain, mixed with salad, on toast, or mashed with dijon mustard and onions as a spread.

    9. Turmeric: The “superstar of spices,” it may have anti-inflammatory and anti-cancer properties.
    How to eat: Mix with scrambled eggs or in any vegetable dish.

    10. Frozen blueberries: Even though freezing can degrade some of the nutrients in fruits and vegetables, frozen blueberries are available year-round and don’t spoil; associated with better memory in animal studies.
    How to eat: Blended with yogurt or chocolate soy milk and sprinkled with crushed almonds.

    11. Canned pumpkin: A low-calorie vegetable that is high in fiber and immune-stimulating vitamin A; fills you up on very few calories.
    How to eat: Mix with a little butter, cinnamon and nutmeg.

  2. #2
    The King Liason's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by FeatheredFrenzy View Post
    9. Turmeric: The “superstar of spices,” it may have anti-inflammatory and anti-cancer properties.
    How to eat: Mix with scrambled eggs or in any vegetable dish.
    I made a dish using turmeric recently :] about a tablespoon for a dried cup of millet.


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    Gotta catch you all! Blackmail!'s Avatar
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    Are you aware several turmeric species (Curcuma sp) are easy to grow, blooms magnificently, and make wonderful houseplants?
    "A man who only drinks water has a secret to hide from his fellow-men" -Baudelaire

    7w8 SCUxI

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    Playnerd Timeless's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Liason View Post
    I made a dish using turmeric recently :] about a tablespoon for a dried cup of millet.


    That looks good... and I just ate something already.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Timeless View Post
    That looks good... and I just ate something already.
    I concur. It looks sooo damn tasty.

    Pomegranate juice I luuuurve. It has a tang that is very satisfying. I don't drink softdrink (what do you Americans call it, soda?), but if you are someone who would like to cut down your soda intake or ween yourself off it altogether, I suggest that you replace your usual fizzy drinks with pomegranate juice.

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    pretty dish Liason!
    chocolate has the most antioxidants of all foods. not that it should matter. question: if i buy these "healthiest foods" and promise to eat them, would it validate my fatass lifestyle?

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    I've been eating quite a bit of bison meat lately (probably 1-2 pounds a week). I've heard from some that is is very good for you, but others will say it is high in cholesterol and should be eating sparingly. Any thoughts on bison?
    [SIGPIC][/SIGPIC]

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    The Architect Alwar's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jonnyboy View Post
    I've been eating quite a bit of bison meat lately (probably 1-2 pounds a week). I've heard from some that is is very good for you, but others will say it is high in cholesterol and should be eating sparingly. Any thoughts on bison?
    I hear it's much leaner than domestic cattle because the latter were primarily bred to have a lot of marbling. Plus Bison are all pastured I think.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jonnyboy View Post
    I've been eating quite a bit of bison meat lately (probably 1-2 pounds a week). I've heard from some that is is very good for you, but others will say it is high in cholesterol and should be eating sparingly. Any thoughts on bison?
    Dietary cholesterol is not a bad thing. Bison is great, although I tend to prefer meats higher in fat, esp. saturated fats...

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