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  1. #31

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    Quote Originally Posted by Risen View Post
    I said for about a year.
    I only read the OP, didn't see anything about length of stay.

    Having lived in Texas for many years myself, I know there's a lot of open space down there and large swaths of wild areas. The trouble of course, is that much of it is owned by an agency or an individual.

    Have you considered paying a sum to someone who owns a lot of natural property to "rent" it? Or renting a hunter's cabin that's isolated?
    "The purpose of life is to be defeated by greater and greater things." - Rainer Maria Rilke

  2. #32
    Senior Member Nonsensical's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Risen View Post
    Colorado would be pretty nice, or Texas I'm thinking. Perhaps even Washington. With the mountainous regions I'd have to cope with the trees and terrain, as well as the winters in northern latitude regions. Learning how to survive a winter where the animal population hides out in the colder months would require a lot of careful effort and preparation, but I'm sure I could do it if I had to. I'm leaning towards Texas because it's farther south, warmer climate, has a great deal of open land, plenty of coastline, and state regulations that are perfect for people like me who despise about government intrusion on private rights and ability to be self sufficient. If I'm going to try this in the U.S., I think texas would definitely be one of the more accommodating places to live in.

    Soul, could you describe your experience in Colorado a bit more? I'm very interested to hear how you guys lived up there.
    Funny you mentioned Texas, too. I was born there and lived there for 6 years until I moved to Colorado.

    Colorado is divided into two areas. On the east side you have the great plains that are like the mid west. Tornadoes, rolling fields, flat lands, etc. Once you hit the Rocky Mountains, it's like running into a brick wall. They arise out of no where and are huge. It's pretty arid, and there isn't as much water as there is in the north west. There's not a whole lot to say other than that it's really really mountainous and rugged. It's not too bad, though, it'd be a nice place to live. You'd probably want to settle on a lake or river, but I'm sure you've thought about that. The wildlife is good and bad. If you're safe and have a gun, you'll be fine. If you're unpretected, then you could be in danger. Bears, wolves, Mountain Lions, and bob cats are not a myth and it's not rare to frequently come across them.

    I lived in a newly built house 10,000 ft above sea level up on a huge mountain in the middle of no where outside of Evergreen, CO. Our power would go out easily and we were often snowed in. Storm fronts can linger for days on the mountains. When it thunderstorms, it really pours. Like torrential down pours that can create flash floods. Our lawn on the mountain didn't have grass, just dirt and rocks and was built on an incline on the mountain so whenever it rained, huge streams and tributaries would form in the ground and it'd flow all the way down. it was really cool, actually. As for temperatures, it really doesn't get that cold in the winter, it's usually in the '20s. And it can be hot in the summer. Enjoy the hot springs, too!
    Is it that by its indefiniteness it shadows forth the heartless voids and immensities of the universe, and thus stabs us from behind with the thought of annihilation, when beholding the white depths of the milky way?

  3. #33
    Senior Member Willfrey's Avatar
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    For shelter have you considered a camper trailer? I'm sure they can be outfitted with solar panels fairly easy and come in a wide range of sizes. Old ones are particularly cheap.
    ...Then I ducked my head and the lights went out, and two guns blazed in the dark;
    And a woman screamed, and the lights went up, and two men lay stiff and stark...

  4. #34
    mountain surfing nomadic's Avatar
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    dood, that sounds cool as heck.

  5. #35
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    Quote Originally Posted by OneWithSoul View Post
    Funny you mentioned Texas, too. I was born there and lived there for 6 years until I moved to Colorado.

    Colorado is divided into two areas. On the east side you have the great plains that are like the mid west. Tornadoes, rolling fields, flat lands, etc. Once you hit the Rocky Mountains, it's like running into a brick wall. They arise out of no where and are huge. It's pretty arid, and there isn't as much water as there is in the north west. There's not a whole lot to say other than that it's really really mountainous and rugged. It's not too bad, though, it'd be a nice place to live. You'd probably want to settle on a lake or river, but I'm sure you've thought about that. The wildlife is good and bad. If you're safe and have a gun, you'll be fine. If you're unpretected, then you could be in danger. Bears, wolves, Mountain Lions, and bob cats are not a myth and it's not rare to frequently come across them.

    I lived in a newly built house 10,000 ft above sea level up on a huge mountain in the middle of no where outside of Evergreen, CO. Our power would go out easily and we were often snowed in. Storm fronts can linger for days on the mountains. When it thunderstorms, it really pours. Like torrential down pours that can create flash floods. Our lawn on the mountain didn't have grass, just dirt and rocks and was built on an incline on the mountain so whenever it rained, huge streams and tributaries would form in the ground and it'd flow all the way down. it was really cool, actually. As for temperatures, it really doesn't get that cold in the winter, it's usually in the '20s. And it can be hot in the summer. Enjoy the hot springs, too!
    Yea.... def not down with the blizzard thing as a first time venture in living alone outdoors. I imagine that's the one thing that could kick my ass. Bears, lions wolves... not so bad. Animals that size could be handled with or without a gun (the sword training helps there...), assuming you're not trying to fend against a whole pack of animals. I'll still need firearm training before I go out though, and I'll have to take those expenses into account.

  6. #36
    Senior Member Nonsensical's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Risen View Post
    Yea.... def not down with the blizzard thing as a first time venture in living alone outdoors. I imagine that's the one thing that could kick my ass. Bears, lions wolves... not so bad. Animals that size could be handled with or without a gun (the sword training helps there...), assuming you're not trying to fend against a whole pack of animals. I'll still need firearm training before I go out though, and I'll have to take those expenses into account.
    Yeah. The blizzards aren't even as bad as people make them out to be. I lived two winters up on that remote desolate mountain and the most snow we got was just about 2 feet, so not too bad- but there can be more depending on your location.

    A weapon is a must. Swords would be just as good as guns. You'd probably want to take both, though. Actually, you'd want to have a lot of ammo and a few guns. On the specific side of things, make sure to have an axe or two, because you'd be cutting fire all summer and stocking it up in a safe location for the winter.

    Evergreen, where I lived, has one of the most populous elk population in the world. Throughout the town, there are valleys and valleys full of wild elk. I'm talking about thousands and thousands. We'd find them in our yard and on our porch, no lie. We even found mountain lion tracks on our deck one winter.

    For food, I'd highly recommend elk. Non aggressive like dear, full of meat, huge, and you can use the bones and everything else in it for supplies if you're hard core about this living natural thing.

    Here's a picture from the internet about the elk planes in Evergreen:



    There's also a small wild Buffalo population, actually, which was a golden gem to the Native Americans of the region and the plains. If you are really living off the grid, you wouldn't need a hunters lisence, because killing buffalo and maybe elk might be illegal. But don't worry, if you are in the woods, anything goes man.

    Just a neat little fun fact: In the woods up behind out house that we'd explore, we'd actually find crudely made teepee's most likely from the Natives. The hide walls were deteriorated but the shape is still there. There were a lot of Natives in the region, and being out in the woods at night under a campfire is a once in a life time experience. Just you, the fire, and the darkness and stillness of the world. No wonder the Natives were so hard core.
    Is it that by its indefiniteness it shadows forth the heartless voids and immensities of the universe, and thus stabs us from behind with the thought of annihilation, when beholding the white depths of the milky way?

  7. #37
    Don't pet me. JAVO's Avatar
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    The forest is the place to be when you're living off the land.

    A good axe is very important for long-term shelter construction and providing heat in the winter. It is best paired with a good buck saw, as sawing is more efficient than chopping.

    Learn bushcraft: Read and watch Ray Mears and Mor Kochanski.

  8. #38
    Senior Member MonkeyGrass's Avatar
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    If I did it, I'd walk the Appalachian Trail. Maybe someday, I will still.
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  9. #39
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    Quote Originally Posted by OneWithSoul View Post
    Yeah. The blizzards aren't even as bad as people make them out to be. I lived two winters up on that remote desolate mountain and the most snow we got was just about 2 feet, so not too bad- but there can be more depending on your location.

    A weapon is a must. Swords would be just as good as guns. You'd probably want to take both, though. Actually, you'd want to have a lot of ammo and a few guns. On the specific side of things, make sure to have an axe or two, because you'd be cutting fire all summer and stocking it up in a safe location for the winter.

    Evergreen, where I lived, has one of the most populous elk population in the world. Throughout the town, there are valleys and valleys full of wild elk. I'm talking about thousands and thousands. We'd find them in our yard and on our porch, no lie. We even found mountain lion tracks on our deck one winter.

    For food, I'd highly recommend elk. Non aggressive like dear, full of meat, huge, and you can use the bones and everything else in it for supplies if you're hard core about this living natural thing.

    Here's a picture from the internet about the elk planes in Evergreen:



    There's also a small wild Buffalo population, actually, which was a golden gem to the Native Americans of the region and the plains. If you are really living off the grid, you wouldn't need a hunters lisence, because killing buffalo and maybe elk might be illegal. But don't worry, if you are in the woods, anything goes man.

    Just a neat little fun fact: In the woods up behind out house that we'd explore, we'd actually find crudely made teepee's most likely from the Natives. The hide walls were deteriorated but the shape is still there. There were a lot of Natives in the region, and being out in the woods at night under a campfire is a once in a life time experience. Just you, the fire, and the darkness and stillness of the world. No wonder the Natives were so hard core.
    Thank you for the plethora of info you're provided (and everyone else). I already figured I'd need a good axe or two, and some sharpening tools. I consider the sword to be a must, and I just remembered that could cost a good $700~$1000 for a quality blade. Not something I want to go cheap on if I'm gonna be in the woods by myself for a year, a well crafted blade is vital to its longevity. If I move somewhere where there's bison, the guns will most definitely come in handy. And f*** hunting regulations. Most game/eating animals are overpopulated anyway. I swear if I get any environmentalist idiots who show up to my shack and complain about me hunting...

    BTW, it looks as if I'll really be taking my first camping trip this weekend. Due to my current supplies, money, timing, and situation, I'll be doing it the easy way. Just taking the SUV into a developed camp site in a state park (with a shower and flush toilet... jeez). At least I'll be able to learn how to use a campfire and cook with it. I probably wont be able to fish because there are few camp areas to do that around San Diego, and I cant really afford a friggin fishing liscence right now. So retarded.

    At least I have plenty of meat in the freezer I can throw into a cooler for 2 days. I also plan to bring some beans, rice, nuts, and fruit for the 2 day trip. Does anyone have any further tips for a first time camper?

  10. #40
    Nips away your dignity Fluffywolf's Avatar
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    I don't claim to be a sword expert, but I would venture a guess that a machete is much more useful than a conventional sword. :P
    ~Self-depricating Megalomaniacal Superwolf

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