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  1. #21
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    Colorado would be pretty nice, or Texas I'm thinking. Perhaps even Washington. With the mountainous regions I'd have to cope with the trees and terrain, as well as the winters in northern latitude regions. Learning how to survive a winter where the animal population hides out in the colder months would require a lot of careful effort and preparation, but I'm sure I could do it if I had to. I'm leaning towards Texas because it's farther south, warmer climate, has a great deal of open land, plenty of coastline, and state regulations that are perfect for people like me who despise about government intrusion on private rights and ability to be self sufficient. If I'm going to try this in the U.S., I think texas would definitely be one of the more accommodating places to live in.

    Soul, could you describe your experience in Colorado a bit more? I'm very interested to hear how you guys lived up there.

  2. #22
    Emperor/Dictator kyuuei's Avatar
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    I know where to go if I'm being chased by the cops now..
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  3. #23
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    I'd suggest watching or reading "into the wild" and taking as an example of what NOT to do.. We are only human. It would be nice to get more in touch with how our predecessors did it, but weren't they generally part of a society in some way? I'd start looking at it for the long haul.. educate yourself on as much as possible with all you can find. Learn how to live more minimally now so that it's not such a huge shock when you do make the transition. How will you do simple things, like make a net or make soap? Sure, you can take it with you, but things break/ get used up.

    What sort of shelter? Build your own? Tools needed and how to replace them if you don't have money supplies.. learn about first aid and what to do if you are living 30 miles away from civilization and need to splint an ankle or leg to get out.

    Get used to the fact that every way that you do things will have to change. I would even think of doing some extended backcountry camp trips to get used to idea and to see how every little thing you do, like heating water, has to be looked at in a new way. Sure, gas camp stoves are nice, but if you are off the grid for the long haul, it's not gonna be really economical.

    Oh, and I hope you are serious.. you would be living my dream!

  4. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by RuffledINTP View Post
    I'd suggest watching or reading "into the wild" and taking as an example of what NOT to do.. We are only human. It would be nice to get more in touch with how our predecessors did it, but weren't they generally part of a society in some way? I'd start looking at it for the long haul.. educate yourself on as much as possible with all you can find. Learn how to live more minimally now so that it's not such a huge shock when you do make the transition. How will you do simple things, like make a net or make soap? Sure, you can take it with you, but things break/ get used up.

    What sort of shelter? Build your own? Tools needed and how to replace them if you don't have money supplies.. learn about first aid and what to do if you are living 30 miles away from civilization and need to splint an ankle or leg to get out.

    Get used to the fact that every way that you do things will have to change. I would even think of doing some extended backcountry camp trips to get used to idea and to see how every little thing you do, like heating water, has to be looked at in a new way. Sure, gas camp stoves are nice, but if you are off the grid for the long haul, it's not gonna be really economical.

    Oh, and I hope you are serious.. you would be living my dream!
    Well of course i wont be using a gas stove . Good old fire making techniques only. However, I might check into using a sort of grill that would allow for the use of wood. I imagine this would cut down on the difficulty of maintaining a fire pit. I plan to include quite a few modern conveniences. This isn't really about going full survival mode as much as it is getting away from all dependence on fellow members of my species for an extended time period. I'm hoping to have enough to invest in solar power equipment and possibly a refrigerator to make it easier to preserve food, lest i learn how to pickle, can, smoke, etc. every food item I obtain. I'll have to learn that anyway, but I'd rather not have to do it for everything if the technology exists not to . I'll be needing a minimum of $2000 for solar equipment.

    My biggest question is really on the type of shelter I'll be able to use and, again, the property it'll sit on. That's the most difficult part of figuring this out. I would do juuuust fine living in a worn down shack with decent rain and rodent protection. One problem is that if I live around the gulf, close to the coast, I'd really need something sturdy enough to survive a potential hurricane . That would definitely push up my expenditures, though it wouldn't be such a problem in other areas.

    Then, I need to figure out the logistics of traveling out to the location, picking a place to settle, getting the form of shelter one way or another, and oh yea, getting all my stuff out there. The only thing I'd need to bring are a few clothes, provisions, and equipment, but that'd still be a bit of a haul, and potentially very difficult depending how far out the location would be. I should also consider whether or not i want a cheap car for emergencies. This will all take quite a bit of planning.

  5. #25
    Senior Member Kyrielle's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Risen View Post
    Well of course i wont be using a gas stove . Good old fire making techniques only. However, I might check into using a sort of grill that would allow for the use of wood. I imagine this would cut down on the difficulty of maintaining a fire pit.
    That just reminded me. Consider living where there is clay. I say this because with clay, you'll be able to make a clay stove (if your grill breaks) that would allow you to bake food and probably make rudimentary pottery. (Like if your bowls get lost or broken.)
    "I took the one less traveled by,
    And that has made all the difference."

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  6. #26
    Nips away your dignity Fluffywolf's Avatar
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    Where there is water, there is clay. No? Maybe not, not really into geology that much.

    Oh apart from volcanic islands that is, don't think there tends to be clay there. Or maybe there is. No idea.
    ~Self-depricating Megalomaniacal Superwolf

  7. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kyrielle View Post
    That just reminded me. Consider living where there is clay. I say this because with clay, you'll be able to make a clay stove (if your grill breaks) that would allow you to bake food and probably make rudimentary pottery. (Like if your bowls get lost or broken.)
    Thanks for the tip, that does make sense. the Midwest had plenty of clay soil.

    On another note, I'm also (as of the past hour) planning to go camping for about 3 days since my house is being fumigated for f***ing termites. Anything I should be aware of for planning a camping trip? I figured I could just drive out somewhere, sleep in the car, and try my hand at roughing it for a a couple days. I'm planning to bring rice, beans, and water for that, plus pots and toilet paper. I need to look up hunting and fire starting regulations. Again, I'll likely just bring a grill along.

  8. #28

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    Quote Originally Posted by Risen View Post
    I'm thinking of taking the plunge. Contunuing ina full time job, dropping school, and saving all my money to get started on living on my own SOMEWHERE away from people. Just me, nature, and all the animals I can hunt for free and plants I can grow. Logistically, I need three things more than anything else:

    1. Land where it'd be legal for me to live off of with limited tax liabilities and other intrusions by government regulation meant to prevent people from being self sufficient and living outside of society. Outside the U.S. if need be.

    2. A hardy location with enough water to support 1 human being, enough animals to hunt (no problem if this is a location near the ocean).

    3. A good climate fit for growing a few crops and mild winters. A location with a fair amount of wild edible flora would be a plus.


    Hunter/gatherer sort of living with a bit agricultural action. Preferably I shouldn't really NEED to raise any livestock, but it'd be an open possibility. It might be more of a necessity if I have to pay a lot of money annually to the government or what have you. The money I save should be enough to supply my tools and starting seeds or possible land costs for a year, though I could make plans to make room to produce a surplus of food items which could be sold.

    In any case, does anyone have any ideas or suggestions? The hardest part is obviously finding a good location where you will be ALLOWED to live this way. This is something that should be open to every American in this vast country (of vast swaths of federal land forfeited by the dumb ass states), but alas, that quality has fallen by the wayside as so many things in this country have. Hunting, fishing, growing food, shitting outside; that's easy crap. I'd just need to hone my skills a bit before making the journey and learn quite a few things while saving the money.
    Is this a short-term excursion, a long-term experiment, or a life-style decision la The Bet by Anton Chekhov? This will greatly influence my input.
    "The purpose of life is to be defeated by greater and greater things." - Rainer Maria Rilke

  9. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by iwakar View Post
    Is this a short-term excursion, a long-term experiment, or a life-style decision la The Bet by Anton Chekhov? This will greatly influence my input.
    I said for about a year.

  10. #30
    Member Maya Z's Avatar
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    Hello Risen!
    I do not have experience with the level of independant living you are talking about, but I grew up on a ranch. It was mostly a cattle ranch, but we had an extensive garden where we grew much of our own produce. We were by no means self-sustaining, though.

    I am glad you recognize Texas as a possibility! That is where I grew up and currently live, that is where my family's ranch is. Some people think it is too arid and hot for agriculture, but that is not true. However, if you decide to live in Texas you will need a water source. A well, or something else. The natural rainfall will not be enough for you. I would also consider New Mexico if I were you.

    It seems like it would be a good idea to move gradually. First find the location, then set up a home or shelter, then supply it, if possible while still living somewhere else. You could do the initial set-up while living in a city or town, and make excursions out there to get everything squared away.

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