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  1. #1
    12 and a half weeks BerberElla's Avatar
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    Default Fellow dog owners.........

    I need some advice.

    My beauty, Princess, pulls so hard on her leash whenever we go out for a walk. I took a friends advice and bought a training lead, which goes around the mouth and stops her from pulling because it yanks her head to the side if she tries to pull too hard.

    Now it is working, and walking has become a doddle, but I hate seeing her so restrained.

    She used to sniff trees and try to explore in great eagerness, and now she can't even sniff stuff. I feel bad for her.

    Is there any other way to teach her not to pull so hard on a regular lead?
    Echo - "So are you trying to say she is Evil"

    DeWitt - "Something far worse, she's an Idealist"

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    Senior Member Nonsensical's Avatar
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    I have the same problem. My dog, Molly, is very very energetic when I take her on walks. She always wants to run freely and chase birds and explore, and it makes walking a chore, as I'm always having to tensely drag her back a little, which I don't like. I've tried to teach her, but I know nothing about dogs. I guess I'm in the same boat as you
    Is it that by its indefiniteness it shadows forth the heartless voids and immensities of the universe, and thus stabs us from behind with the thought of annihilation, when beholding the white depths of the milky way?

  3. #3
    12 and a half weeks BerberElla's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by OneWithSoul View Post
    I have the same problem. My dog, Molly, is very very energetic when I take her on walks. She always wants to run freely and chase birds and explore, and it makes walking a chore, as I'm always having to tensely drag her back a little, which I don't like. I've tried to teach her, but I know nothing about dogs. I guess I'm in the same boat as you

    Hopefully we'll both get some tips in this thread.
    Echo - "So are you trying to say she is Evil"

    DeWitt - "Something far worse, she's an Idealist"

    Berb's Johari Berb's Nohari

  4. #4
    Nips away your dignity Fluffywolf's Avatar
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    Does she have a toy or a ball that she is particularly interested in. Or any object or item you can totally get her focus and attention too?

    I've 5 german shephards myself, all very well trained apart from one which is a teenaged rebellion in the making. But have quite a deep understanding and interest in the dog psyche.


    There are two things important ABOVE ALL when it comes to dog training.

    1. Be consistant. Always!
    2. Never punish the bad habits. Encourage the good habits.

    On young puppies/dogs, you can use correctional body language, such as a tap on the nose and such if they're too much of a handful but you should try to focus on being able to encourage him to do right instead of only punish the bad. Sometimes forms punishment is merited ofcourse, but only use it as an absolutely last resort or if he REALLY does something wrong.

    Leashes like that, though effective, only makes the dog uncomfortable. It's a punish and he might start to dislike walking with you alltogether. Depending a bit on the race. Some dogs or quite 'dumb' and will repeatedly follow the same patterns, despite outcome. But in case of german shephards for example. They tend to have a very good memory and if something is not to their liking. It will influence them for the rest of their lives.

    If you are able to keep the focus of the dog on an item you have in your pocket. And occasionally play with it with her so she likes to walk right next to you, focusing on the toy. She will most likely learn and enjoy to walk right next to you. And Encouraging the good behaviour by supplying the treat. (Without ever giving the ball when pulling.) You can in time transition the prize toy with a mere pat on the back for walking next to you.

    To get her to walk next to you, you just have to get her interested in whatever is in your pocket. Watch how long her attention span to it is and everytime you lure her next to you, try to stall giving the prize and let her walk next to you for it for a while, then giving it to her. But remember, it is imperitive you attempt to show the dog in time that it's the proper walking method (next to you) is the reason she gets the prize. Giving the toy to her when she is pulling would completely undermine your intentions and cause the whole training exercise to fail, especially if she is a particularly smart, evolving dog.



    Anyhow, every dog is different and could use different approaches. But point 1 and 2 that I mentioned are always winner. Can't really go wrong as long as you follow those two rules.

  5. #5
    12 and a half weeks BerberElla's Avatar
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    Thanks for the post fluffywolf. She is a staffie so I'm not sure how smart they are, personally I think my cats are much smarter than her lol.

    Umm the only toy she is really into at the moment is her ragging rope, would that work or is it too distracting?

    I truly hate the leash I bought for her, it's really unfair so I won't be using it anymore.

    I am consistent, she just seems to take quite awhile to pick up on things.
    Echo - "So are you trying to say she is Evil"

    DeWitt - "Something far worse, she's an Idealist"

    Berb's Johari Berb's Nohari

  6. #6
    Nips away your dignity Fluffywolf's Avatar
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    A staffie.

    Yeah, they are notorious for being more then a handful. They're quite rigid in their ways. Wouldn't say they're among the 'dumber' races there are. But most definatly among the most stubborn races. Which isn't a bad thing but they do require patience.

    And anything will do, what I use is a rubber like ball with a rope through it. That's 'visible' through my pocket. And train my dogs to be interested in that. But I must say I always train with it from the moment they're a puppy and it's their ultimate reward they know because of it. Trying to get a mature dog interested in a new thing can be hard though, so if she's only interested in the ragging rope. Then it's definatly a viable toy to start with.

    If she's still very playful in general you can try to teach her to become interested in another item to play with you though. A ball on a rope for example has been for me the best 'reward' item. Give it, hold on and tug a bit and then let her win the object after a short wrestle. Dogs love that.

    A ragging rope (if it looks like what I imagine it looks like. It's a pretty broad concept :P ) might be a bit hard to use as a reward in this case. But like I said. The most important thing is for her to be interested in it. So if it's the only thing she likes, it will do. Just show and teach her that it's always in your pocket, ready to be rewarded for showing what you want her to be showing.

  7. #7
    12 and a half weeks BerberElla's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Fluffywolf View Post
    A staffie.

    Yeah, they are notorious for being more then a handful. They're quite rigid in their ways. Wouldn't say they're among the 'dumber' races there are. But most definatly among the most stubborn races. Which isn't a bad thing but they do require patience.

    And anything will do, what I use is a rubber like ball with a rope through it. That's 'visible' through my pocket. And train my dogs to be interested in that. But I must say I always train with it from the moment they're a puppy and it's their ultimate reward they know because of it. Trying to get a mature dog interested in a new thing can be hard though, so if she's only interested in the ragging rope. Then it's definatly a viable toy to start with.

    If she's still very playful in general you can try to teach her to become interested in another item to play with you though. A ball on a rope for example has been for me the best 'reward' item. Give it, hold on and tug a bit and then let her win the object after a short wrestle. Dogs love that.

    A ragging rope (if it looks like what I imagine it looks like. It's a pretty broad concept :P ) might be a bit hard to use as a reward in this case. But like I said. The most important thing is for her to be interested in it. So if it's the only thing she likes, it will do. Just show and teach her that it's always in your pocket, ready to be rewarded for showing what you want her to be showing.
    The ragging rope did infact used to be a ball on a rope lol but she ripped the ball off in a week so all that's left is the rope.

    Unfortunately I didn't get her as a proper pup, she was 16 weeks old when she came to me.

    Her mum died giving birth to her so she didn't experience being around any other dogs and she was kept locked up in a tiny cupboard for most of the 16 weeks until I rescued her. She was also beaten so she is quite a fearful dog, it's taking me time to help ease her worries.
    Echo - "So are you trying to say she is Evil"

    DeWitt - "Something far worse, she's an Idealist"

    Berb's Johari Berb's Nohari

  8. #8
    Nips away your dignity Fluffywolf's Avatar
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    One more thing, you can lure her while saying a command. Like "follow". Before you do the play trick. It might stimulate her to relate the command to the action she is going to do.

    Don't say it in a strong way though. Coming towards you always has to be fun for a dog. Shouting at a dog to come closer to you goes against their instincts. And dogs have a good hearing, there's no reason at all to shout anyhow. Dunno why some people do it. :P )

    However, commands only really work well on dogs that are willing to work for you or the reward (which is 98% of all dogs luckily). Some dogs (the rare 2% :P ) don't respond well to commands. And even though they might want the reward or even be ok with walking next to you. They're unwilling to do so on command. You just have to feel how your dog responds to authority.

    edit: My point here is obviously that it is important for the dog to want to walk next to you.

  9. #9
    Artisan Conquerer Halla74's Avatar
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    Choke collar! Very simple and effective and not inhumane. She can walk at liberty as long as she does not pull so hard that she engages the choke collar. It is the ultimate negative feedback loop and works VERY quickly. This worked on my very stubborn Siberian Husky 19 years ago.

  10. #10
    Nips away your dignity Fluffywolf's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Halla74 View Post
    Choke collar! Very simple and effective and not inhumane. She can walk at liberty as long as she does not pull so hard that she engages the choke collar. It is the ultimate negative feedback loop and works VERY quickly. This worked on my very stubborn Siberian Husky 19 years ago.
    A husky enjoys pulling, they're instinctively driven to it. Most husky's would keep pulling, choke collar or not. Your husky must be a rare case. :P

    A choke collar can definatly work on some dogs that are smart enough not to try it too many times in a row. But at the same time it may also have an effect of them not enjoying the walk alltogether. Depending on the psyche of the dog.

    What works for one dog might not work for another. And in the case of a choke collar it can have negative effects.


    On most german shephards, a choke collar doesn't have any effect on the pulling, but it does offer a great way to get attention or give them a correction without needing to stand up to them dominantly. (A little tug, the collar rattles then chokes slightly gets their attention.)

    But then again, I teach my dogs to follow next to me on command, but in leisure time, when not training, I give them the freedom to do whatever they want, which means 'my dogs pull during leisure walks, since they enjoy that. (Good wrist training.) But choke collar or not, they will keep pulling very strongly. :P

    My shephards are in top condition though. I can ride on a bicycle for 10 kilometer and they pull me all the way at 20-30Km/h (Which is like ehm, 15-20Mph?). It's like sitting on a moped. Vroom vroom.

    But like I said, for some dogs it's in their nature to pull and work. They love it and a choke collar will have no effect, or a negative one in terms of frustration. Plus, when they do pull you're instinctively going to correct them. Which means you keep giving a negative effect to walking. Whilest the other way around. (Rewarding him for not pulling). Will ultimatly keep the dog happier.

    He might like pulling, but if he's rewarded for not pulling or likes to follow your command. You can get him to not pull, without needing to correct him for doing something he enjoys doing.

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