User Tag List

First 210111213 Last

Results 111 to 120 of 128

  1. #111
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Posts
    1,128

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by bluebell View Post
    Oops, should have said how I store my home made bread. I always put it in a plastic bag, tightly sealed as soon as it's cooled. I assumed that was a given, sorry. But even if I do that (and double wrap the bread in two bags), it still goes dry and unpleasant the day after, unlike shop bought bread.

    Ah, useful tip. Thank you! I'll try that instead of sugar next time. And thanks for the recipe, although I think it looks pretty similar to the one I use.
    Yes, honey helps. But with any fresh bread, after the first day or so, rewarm in the oven to soften the inside (or slice and toast). It will make a big difference. Toasting/rewarming also fixes bread you've store in the refrigerator.

  2. #112
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Posts
    1,128

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Owl View Post
    This is perfect!

    Thank you, thank you, thank you!
    You're very welcome.

  3. #113
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Posts
    1,128

    Default Ravioli!

    Quote Originally Posted by oberon View Post
    So malia... let's say I wanted to make some really good ravioli, some with a meat filling and some with, say, spinach. What do I do?
    Quote Originally Posted by oberon View Post
    I'm thinking of making them from scratch. Don't know if you do the fresh pasta thing, or if it's really worth the trouble.

    I can has guidance, plz?

    I would make a good fresh pasta, and a good filling. You don't really need a recipe for either; I just throw things together until they look right (I suppose there is still a list of "things").

    However, I will give you a recipe for the pasta AND the fillings, 'cause I'm extra nice.

    Having a good pasta roller or roller attachment for your Kitchen Aid mixer is really wonderful, but I rolled my pasta out by hand with a rolling pin for years, so it can be done!

    Mario Batali's fresh pasta recipe is extremely authentic. My Italian someday-mother-in-law does it the same way and does not measure at all.



    Mario Batali's Fresh Pasta:
    ================

    3 1/2 cups unbleached all-purpose flour
    4 extra-large eggs

    Mound the flour in the center of a large wooden cutting board. Make a well in the middle of the flour, add the eggs. Using a fork, beat together the eggs and begin to incorporate the flour starting with the inner rim of the well. As you incorporate the eggs, keep pushing the flour up to retain the well shape (do not worry if it looks messy). The dough will come together in a shaggy mass when about half of the flour is incorporated.

    Start kneading the dough with both hands, primarily using the palms of your hands. Add more flour, in 1/2-cup increments, if the dough is too sticky. Once the dough is a cohesive mass, remove the dough from the board and scrape up any left over dry bits. Lightly flour the board and continue kneading for 3 more minutes. The dough should be elastic and a little sticky. Continue to knead for another 3 minutes, remembering to dust your board with flour when necessary. Wrap the dough in plastic wrap and set aside for 20 minutes at room temperature. Roll and form as desired.

    Note: Do not skip the kneading or resting portion of this recipe, they are essential for a light pasta.

    --

    Now, if you're going to use a rolling pin, after your dough has rested (see recipe above), cut into about four manageable pieces and roll one out into a big, thin rectangle (always cover any dough you're not using with a damp cloth so it doesn't dry out). If you're using a pasta roller, divide your dough into smallish pieces and follow the instruction on the roller (ask me if you want instructions for the way I do it [probably the same as your roller's instructions]). Your end result should be almost-paper thin sheets of pasta.

    Then, when not using a pasta molding machine to make ravioli (I've tried one of these and it's PRETTY fancy), I like to slice my sheets into long, thin rectangles, roughly 2"x10-12", and then spoon teaspoonfuls of filling in an orderly row, leaving plenty of space around the mounds of filling for eventually sealing the ravioli with a top sheet of dough.

    Once you've spooned out your filling, dip your fingertips in a little water and slick up the edges of your bottom sheet of dough. Dry your fingers, and top with a dough rectangle the same size as your bottom sheet (2"x10-12").

    Carefully press the dough rectangles together, all around the sides and around each filling mound, pressing hard so as to seal the top to the bottom. You should now have a long rectangle with a row of little hills all the way down.

    Now, take a sharp knife and make cuts after each mound, leaving a dozen or so ravioli squares. Place raviolis on a flour-dusted cookie sheet or breadboard to dry out for about 20 minutes, then cook or save in the fridge for later use (they keep about 5 days in the fridge).

    Repeat with all the dough, or save any unused dough in the fridge/freezer.
    --

    Here are some filling recipes (feel free to double or triple and then freeze what you don't use for later -- this makes filling pasta easy as pie, especially if you want to fill store bought pasta shells or manicotti at the last minute):


    Sausage & Mushroom Pasta Filling
    =====================

    12 ounces portabello mushrooms, cleaned, and chopped fine
    4 links spicy or sweet Italian sausage, removed from casings and crumbled
    handful fresh basil leaves, washed and chopped rough
    4 cloves fresh garlic, sliced thin or chopped fine
    1/4 cup goat cheese, cumbled
    *optional: 1/4 cup sundried tomatoes, drained and chopped fine
    salt & pepper, just a bit, to taste
    olive oil

    Heat olive oil in a cast iron or nonstick skillet (8"-12") on medium heat. Saute mushrooms with sundried tomatoes until mushrooms have shrunk and are limp. Season with salt and pepper, but don't over-season, as the sausage will be salty.

    Add basil leaves and garlic, and saute another 30 seconds to minute longer.

    Remove contents of saucepan, and set aside in a bowl or other container.

    Add crumbly sausage meat to still hot pan. With wooden spoon, turn and break up meat and cook until well browned (like you would ground beef).

    Drain meat, and add to bowl with remaining ingredients. Stir to combine. Fold in crumbly goat cheese. Refrigerate mixture until time to fill pasta.

    --


    Spinach & Cheese Pasta Filling
    ===================

    8 oz. ricotta cheese (I like going to my local natural foods co-op and buying my fresh cheese from as local a dairy as possible - the fresh flavor of local organic ricotta is simply unmatched!)
    1/4 cup freshly grated hard cheese (such as parmesan, romano, pecorino, asiago, or whatever you like best)
    1 egg, beaten
    2 tablespoons (or more, to taste) Italian (flat-leaf) parsley
    6 oz. frozen spinach, thawed and drained
    salt and pepper, to taste
    herbs, to taste (basil, oregano, rosemary -- whatever you like)
    pinch nutmeg

    Combine the ingredients in the order given, by stirring together in a medium-large bowl. Refrigerate until ready to fill pasta.
    ==
    *NOTE: as you can see, fillings are pretty much anything goes. Create your own! The key is to TASTE what you're putting together. If it tastes gross in your bowl, it won't improve any in your pasta. Less seasoning is more, until you get it just right.



    P.S. I hope my directions were good, and not too simple or too confusing. Let me know if they were either...

  4. #114
    I'm a star. Kangirl's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    MBTI
    ENTJ
    Posts
    1,470

    Default

    Malia, can you help me with a simple-seeming but strangely intractable problem?

    My ridged cast iron pan. WHY does everything stick to it? WHY?! I have seasoned, I have repeatedly seasoned. I have done everything I was supposed to do. And shit still sticks to this thing every. time.

    Help me pls.
    "Only an irrational dumbass, would burn Jews." - Jaguar

    "please give concise answers in plain English" - request from Provoker

  5. #115
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Posts
    1,128

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Kangirl View Post
    Malia, can you help me with a simple-seeming but strangely intractable problem?

    My ridged cast iron pan. WHY does everything stick to it? WHY?! I have seasoned, I have repeatedly seasoned. I have done everything I was supposed to do. And shit still sticks to this thing every. time.

    Help me pls.
    1. How do you clean this pan?

    2. Do you always make sure to add additional grease (oil, butter, fat of some kind) warm in your pan before you go to saute something?

    After you answer those questions, I can help better.

  6. #116
    Gotta catch you all! Blackmail!'s Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    MBTI
    ENTP
    Enneagram
    7w8
    Posts
    2,934

    Default

    Dear Malia,

    Do you know any original recipe involving sweet potatoes?

    I've fiendishly suggested my students to cultivate some Ipomoea batatas outdoors, just to show them what "global warming" really means, but, what will we do with them once they are ripe?

    (Besides the Israeli tsimess I already know)
    "A man who only drinks water has a secret to hide from his fellow-men" -Baudelaire

    7w8 SCUxI

  7. #117
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Posts
    1,128

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Blackmail! View Post
    Dear Malia,

    Do you know any original recipe involving sweet potatoes?

    I've fiendishly suggested my students to cultivate some Ipomoea batatas outdoors, just to show them what "global warming" really means, but, what will we do with them once they are ripe?

    (Besides the Israeli tsimess I already know)
    This Navajo Stew recipe is just delicious:
    http://www.typologycentral.com/forum...-advice-3.html

    Also, I really enjoy this as a side dish (a family favorite for over 10 years now):

    Sweet Potatoes with Pecan Crisp Topping*
    ==========================

    1 cup (packed) golden brown sugar
    1/2 cup chopped pecans (about 2 ounces)
    1/4 cup (1/2 stick) chilled butter, cut into 1/4-inch pieces

    5 pounds red-skinned sweet potatoes (yams), peeled, cut into 1 1/2-inch pieces

    4 large eggs
    3 tablespoons pure maple syrup
    2 tablespoons vanilla extract
    1 tablespoon fresh lemon juice
    2 teaspoons salt

    Preheat oven to 350°F. Mix sugar, pecans and butter in small bowl. Cover and chill until ready to use. (Can be made up to 2 days ahead. Keep refrigerated.)

    Butter 13 x 9 x 2-inch glass baking dish. Cook sweet potatoes in large pot of boiling salted water until very tender, about 12 minutes. Drain. Let stand in colander 15 minutes. Purée sweet potatoes in processor.

    Beat eggs, syrup, vanilla, lemon juice and salt in large bowl. Mix in puréed sweet potatoes. Transfer sweet potato mixture to prepared dish. Sprinkle pecan topping evenly over mixture.

    Bake until sweet potato mixture is set and topping bubbles, about 1 hour. Let stand 15 minutes and serve.


    *P.S. Please let me know if you would like measurements in grams, cm's (for the pan), and oven temperature in Celsius. The same goes for all my recipes.

  8. #118
    desert pelican Owl's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    MBTI
    INTP
    Posts
    717

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by maliafee View Post
    Rogan Josh is the best lamb dish I make. There are a lot of things you can successfully do with lamb, but this is my favorite as it has spicy Indian flavors and the lamb is oh-so tender.
    The stew is cooking right now, and my house smells awesome.

    Last night, I chopped the onion, the chili's, and the garlic with my bare hands, and I scooped the chili seeds out with my fingers. My nose started to itch, so I rubbed it a bit. I thought my nose was going to catch on fire.

    I'll edit this thread later tonight to let you know how it turned out.

    Thanks again,
    Owl

    EDIT: The stew was smashing, and I'm stuffed.

  9. #119
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Posts
    1,128

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Owl View Post
    The stew is cooking right now, and my house smells awesome.

    Last night, I chopped the onion, the chili's, and the garlic with my bare hands, and I scooped the chili seeds out with my fingers. My nose started to itch, so I rubbed it a bit. I thought my nose was going to catch on fire.

    I'll edit this thread later tonight to let you know how it turned out.

    Thanks again,
    Owl
    Uh oh, I forgot to warn you about chilis. You always wash your hands well after touching a chili (if it's a hot one, even the skin will getcha), especially the seeds, before you touch your face. At least you didn't touch your eye! ACK!

    I'm so pleased to hear about you making a recommended dish. I hope it turns out! (I'm sure it will; you sound capable and it's a lovely, easy recipe - YUM!)

  10. #120
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Posts
    1,128

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Owl View Post
    The stew was smashing, and I'm stuffed.
    SO good to hear. I looove that recipe!

Similar Threads

  1. Ask for an advice
    By Fay in forum The Fluff Zone
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 03-06-2014, 06:44 PM
  2. INTP caricaturist asking your advice
    By Frederico Rogeiro in forum Arts & Entertainment
    Replies: 6
    Last Post: 09-01-2010, 06:58 AM
  3. Replies: 6
    Last Post: 04-17-2010, 05:44 PM
  4. asking for reading advice
    By mippus in forum Philosophy and Spirituality
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 03-10-2008, 02:42 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
Single Sign On provided by vBSSO