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  1. #91
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mo_(operalover) View Post
    OMG, it's an ESFJ in ISFP's clothing.

    *screams and runs away*

    Hahaha, I'm SO not ESFJ... Don't worry Mo!

    ;-)

  2. #92
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    Quote Originally Posted by oberon View Post
    Show your boyfriend Qre's post, and it may push the process along some.
    Teehee.

    Nah, I'm not in a rush.

  3. #93
    Oberon
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    So malia... let's say I wanted to make some really good ravioli, some with a meat filling and some with, say, spinach. What do I do?

  4. #94
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    Quote Originally Posted by oberon View Post
    So malia... let's say I wanted to make some really good ravioli, some with a meat filling and some with, say, spinach. What do I do?
    Do you want to make 'em from scratch, or do you have the raviolis in the fridge, fresh in a package?

  5. #95
    No moss growing on me Giggly's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mo_(operalover) View Post
    OMG, it's an ESFJ in ISFP's clothing.

    *screams and runs away*

    hehehe malia does seem quite ESFJ in this thread.

    Malia, pork chops.

    I've had a huge craving for pork chops in the last week. Any good recipes?

  6. #96
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    Thumbs up Grandma's pork chops!

    Quote Originally Posted by Hmm View Post
    hehehe malia does seem quite ESFJ in this thread.

    Malia, pork chops.

    I've had a huge craving for pork chops in the last week. Any good recipes?
    Only my grandmother's delicious, old-fashioned recipe!!! I just made it two weeks ago.

    I will admit that I use Campbell's condensed soup (if you want to know how to make it good without the Campbell's, I can tell you, but I swear, you can't go wrong with Grandma's Campbell's recipe )!


    Pork Chops
    =======

    Pork chops, bone-in (about 6 medium chops, not too thick)
    OR boneless, but they will not be quite as tender
    Salt and pepper, to taste
    Oil for searing
    1 small onion, chopped
    2 cloves garlic, minced
    1 can Campbell's condensed soup
    1 can (use the empty Campbell's can) water
    1 tablespoon Worcestershire sauce
    2 teaspoons thyme

    Wipe chops with paper towels, trim excess fat, but leave a tiny bit on for flavor and browning.

    Salt and pepper chops on both sides.

    Heat 1-2 tablespoons vegetable oil in a large cast iron skillet on medium-high heat. Sear chops in oil until browned on each side and set chops aside on a plate.

    Turn heat in skillet down to medium, and saute onions in pork drippings/oil left over from searing chops. When onions are golden and limp, add garlic and saute for about 30 seconds more.

    Add a can of Campbell's condensed cream of mushroom soup, and one can water, and stir into the onions and garlic to smooth and combine. Stir in Worcestershire sauce and thyme.

    Allow sauce to come to a simmer, stirring, and cook for 1 minute more. Test sauce for flavor, and add salt and pepper to taste.

    Place pork chops in greased 9"x13" glass casserole dish and pour sauce over them.

    Bake in preheated 350 F oven for about 20-30 minutes for very thin chops, and up to 45 minutes for thick chops.

    Serve with mashed potatoes and green bean & onion casserole (if you want this recipe, don't hesitate to ask).

    Enjoy!

  7. #97
    Oberon
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    Quote Originally Posted by maliafee View Post
    Do you want to make 'em from scratch, or do you have the raviolis in the fridge, fresh in a package?
    I'm thinking of making them from scratch. Don't know if you do the fresh pasta thing, or if it's really worth the trouble.

    I can has guidance, plz?

  8. #98
    desert pelican Owl's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by maliafee View Post
    Rogan Josh is the best lamb dish I make. There are a lot of things you can successfully do with lamb, but this is my favorite as it has spicy Indian flavors and the lamb is oh-so tender.

    [+]

    Easy (and tasty) Basmati Pilau
    This is perfect!

    Thank you, thank you, thank you!

  9. #99
    Lallygag Moderator Geoff's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by maliafee View Post
    Rogan Josh is the best lamb dish I make. There are a lot of things you can successfully do with lamb, but this is my favorite as it has spicy Indian flavors and the lamb is oh-so tender.


    Rogan Josh - Indian Stew
    ================

    2 lbs lamb or beef, cut into 1-inch cubes
    2 tablespoons paprika
    1 tablespoon ground coriander
    2 teaspoons ground cumin
    1 teaspoon ground cardamom
    1/2 teaspoon ground cinnamon
    2 1/2 teaspoons salt
    2 onions, chopped
    2 small chili peppers, chopped
    3 cloves garlic, chopped or crushed
    1 tablespoon fresh ginger root, peeled and minced
    1/4 cup water or low sodium broth
    OR 2 tablespoons tomato paste
    1/4 cup oil (vegetable or olive) OR ghee (Indian clarified butter)
    1/4 cup yogurt
    1/2 - 1 cup water or low sodium broth
    1/4 cup cream
    2 1/2 teaspoons garam masala
    1/2 teaspoon cayenne pepper (or more, to taste)

    In a large bowl, mix meat cubes, paprika, coriander, cumin, cardamom, cinnamon and 1 teaspoon of the salt, until meat is fully coated in the spices. Cover with plastic wrap and allow to marinate in the refrigerator for at least one hour, or preferably overnight.

    Place chopped onions, chili peppers, garlic, ginger, and 1 teaspoon of the salt in food processor or blender and puree. Add the 1/4 cup water/broth or 2 tablespoons tomato paste and continue pureeing to form a paste.

    Heat oil or ghee in a large, heavy-bottomed pot over medium heat. Working in two or three batches, brown the meat on all sides, removing each batch to a plate as it finishes.

    Add more ghee or oil to the pot (this will most likely not be necessary as there will be excess oil from browning the meat). Add onion puree mixture and saute, stirring constantly, until the mixture cooks down a bit and begins to brown. Add the yogurt bit by bit, stirring and cooking down until all the yogurt has been added.

    Return the meat to the pot and add enough water/broth to make a rich sauce. Bring to a boil and then cover, reduce heat to low and simmer, stirring occasionally, for 1 1/2-2 hours, or until the meat is very tender. Adjust pot lid during the last 45 minutes of cooking in order to allow just a crack of steam to escape the pot.

    Remove from heat and add the garam masala, cream, and cayenne pepper. Taste, and if necessary add the remaining 1/2 teaspoon of salt (or as little/much as necessary) and any additional cayenne, to taste.

    Serve with naan or rice.


    Easy (and tasty) Basmati Pilau

    1/4 cup butter or ghee
    2 cups basmati rice
    2 teaspoons turmeric
    2 bay leaves
    8 green cardamom pods (or 3/4 teaspoon ground cardamom)
    8 whole cloves
    1 teaspoon whole fennel seed
    2 teaspoons salt
    3 1/4 cups boiling water

    Melt butter in a saucepan. Stir in the rice until it is coated in butter. Stir in spices and salt. Add the boiling water. Cover with a tight fitting lid and simmer on the lowest heat for 15 minutes (do not stir or open the lid in the meantime). Turn off the heat and let rest for 5 minutes. Fluff and serve.
    Have you tried roasting and grinding the seed forms of the spices? Where you have cumin and coriander, fry the seeds in a dry pan for about 2 minutes then grind them in a pestle and mortar (or is it mortar and pestle.. I never know ). Secondly, try replacing the ground cinnamon with a cinnamon stick that you leave in while it is stewing.

    Both of these things make quite a difference to an indian stew One can always leave said stew for an entire afternoon in the slow cooker/crockpot. Yumm!

    By the way.. I am *sure* you know this, but some people may not. All indian stews and meaty curries must must MUST be served with some mango chutney. Encourage your diners to stir a tablespoon into the curry before eating.

    Oh.. yes. Lots of indian recipes call for the ingredients to be blended to be smooth (as with yours). I've found you can often ignore this time consuming/messy step as the onions etc break down when they are stewed and a little texture never hurts

  10. #100
    Senior Member bluebell's Avatar
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    Hi Malia, just wondering if you know of any recipes for making bread where the bread stays fresh for several days, not just one? (I don't make bread often but I'd be more motivated to do it if the bread was palatable for more than a day, and no, I don't use a breadmaker.)
    ...so much smoke pouring out of each chromosome.

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