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  1. #21
    Oberon
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    Okay, I guess what I'm really thinking of as "pot pie" is what is more properly referred to in the world at large as "slippery pot pie."

    Sahara, in the US to use the word "pie" without any modifiers usually implies something sweet, i.e. a dessert pie such as apple pie, cherry pie, pecan pie, key lime pie, and so on.

    Ooooh...key lime pie...I want some!


  2. #22
    Senior Member cafe's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ivy View Post
    I do understand that cafe's son(s) (and targo's?) have medical issues that contribute to that. Mine's just picky. Actually, it's my daughter who is picky-- the boy will eat just about anything unless it's in sandwich format, oddly enough. (I am a mean, mean mother who still serves him sandwiches if that's what everybody else is eating-- he takes them apart and eats the components.)

    The pot pie is in the oven right now.
    Even without the autism, I'll admit that I've never been big on the idea of making kids eat stuff they don't like. I do like them to try things, but the way I see it, I don't go to the grocery store and intentionally buy things I don't like then force myself to eat them, so not giving them input about what I make, then expecting them to eat it is hypocritical. I'm not going to make them separate meals, and I do dislike complaining, but if they tried a bite or two and honestly don't like it, it's no big if they go make themselves a cheese sandwich or something.

    Now that I know there is autism involved, I first, thank God in heaven that they eat as many things as they do (some of the stories I've heard!) and realize making the pickier eating son eat things with "sauce" would be the sensory equivalent to locking his slightly less picky eater brother into a room with a running vacuum cleaner that could not be turned off. If I ever did that I would deserve to got to jail for child abuse.

    Of course, now I really don't cook anymore.
    “There are two novels that can change a bookish fourteen-year old’s life: The Lord of the Rings and Atlas Shrugged. One is a childish fantasy that often engenders a lifelong obsession with its unbelievable heroes, leading to an emotionally stunted, socially crippled adulthood, unable to deal with the real world. The other, of course, involves orcs.”
    ~ John Rogers

  3. #23
    Senior Member Sahara's Avatar
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    That looks soooooo nice. (drooling)

    In the Uk pie is savoury, sweet is always cake of some type.

    I kept wondering if a pot pie was like a stew with a pastry lid over the top. They are nice too.
    "No one can be free of the chains that surround them"

  4. #24
    Oberon
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    Note: If you ever order key lime pie and it's green, you're getting a second-rate product. Lime juice is cloudy white/translucent and will yield a white-to-cream-colored pie filling, depending on the other ingredients. If the pie is green it's because somebody added food coloring to it.

  5. #25
    Oberon
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sahara View Post
    I kept wondering if a pot pie was like a stew with a pastry lid over the top. They are nice too.
    Bottom crust is optional, though I prefer it. The rich pastry saturated with gravy is one of the best parts.

  6. #26
    Senior Member Sahara's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by oberon67 View Post
    Bottom crust is optional, though I prefer it. The rich pastry saturated with gravy is one of the best parts.

    Or what about stew in giant Yorkshire puddings? oh boy now that is delicious.
    "No one can be free of the chains that surround them"

  7. #27
    Oberon
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sahara View Post
    Or what about stew in giant Yorkshire puddings? oh boy now that is delicious.
    Though I know what Yorkshire pudding is by reading about it, I've never had the pleasure of eating one.

  8. #28
    Senior Member Sahara's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by oberon67 View Post
    Though I know what Yorkshire pudding is by reading about it, I've never had the pleasure of eating one.

    You must try them, they are scrumptious bites of heaven, and really easy to make, I love making large ones and pouring gravy and veg into the middle, looks good too.
    "No one can be free of the chains that surround them"

  9. #29
    Strongly Ambivalent Ivy's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by cafe View Post
    Even without the autism, I'll admit that I've never been big on the idea of making kids eat stuff they don't like. I do like them to try things, but the way I see it, I don't go to the grocery store and intentionally buy things I don't like then force myself to eat them, so not giving them input about what I make, then expecting them to eat it is hypocritical. I'm not going to make them separate meals, and I do dislike complaining, but if they tried a bite or two and honestly don't like it, it's no big if they go make themselves a cheese sandwich or something.
    I agree with you on all of this. My philosophy is "it's my job to put nutritious and appetizing food in front of them, and it's their job to eat as much or as little of it as they like." So I serve what I serve and they eat it or don't, but I do take their preferences into consideration when I decide what to make. And if they truly, truly do not like a food, I might still give them a tiny bit of it (they say it can take up to 10-15 times of offering a new food before a kid will accept it) but I don't actually care if they eat it. I try to make sure there are enough "courses" that everybody gets SOMETHING they like, if it's not the entire meal. I hate cajoling them into eating something-- once the food is on the table, I am totally hands-off. That includes making new food; if they want something else, they're welcome to get it themselves.
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  10. #30
    Senior Member Sahara's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ivy View Post
    I agree with you on all of this. My philosophy is "it's my job to put nutritious and appetizing food in front of them, and it's their job to eat as much or as little of it as they like." So I serve what I serve and they eat it or don't, but I do take their preferences into consideration when I decide what to make. And if they truly, truly do not like a food, I might still give them a tiny bit of it (they say it can take up to 10-15 times of offering a new food before a kid will accept it) but I don't actually care if they eat it. I try to make sure there are enough "courses" that everybody gets SOMETHING they like, if it's not the entire meal. I hate cajoling them into eating something-- once the food is on the table, I am totally hands-off. That includes making new food; if they want something else, they're welcome to get it themselves.
    I wish I could behave the way you and cafe do at the dinner times, I get so stressed and it turns into a battle that I usually lose.

    Ok I am going to try again today, I wll make the cannelloni, serve it, and then try to ignore the waste, the picking, the moaning and the outright refusal to eat.
    "No one can be free of the chains that surround them"

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