User Tag List

12 Last

Results 1 to 10 of 14

  1. #1
    FRACTALICIOUS phobik's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Posts
    7,291

    Default Double Your Energy in 7 Days

    energy through tranquility rather than stimulation
    understanding your blood pH, the health of your digestive system, your adrenal glands, which foods are better for natural energy, whether or not nootropics can help, how to manage stress, and how much exercise you should be doing


    • How your lack of energy could be due to your blood pH level and how to check your pH.
    • Why you feel exhausted after a large meal and how to deal with this.
    • How eating less can give you an energy boost.
    • Why you might be suffering from adrenal fatigue and what to do about it.
    • How adaptogens can help reduce fatigue and boost energy.
    • The specific foods that promote better well-being and increased energy.
    • What Yuri thinks about nootropics and “smart drugs”.
    • How to manage stress and avoid that energy dump that follows emotional or stressful events.
    • How to exercise smarter to boost your energy and leave you feeling great.


    Double Your Energy in 7 Days: How to Feel Your Best and Get More Done


    Interesting podcast and resonating tips, some I've experienced my self, it'd be cool if someone with med/bio training could comment on the more technical stuff @ygolo



    To avoid criticism, do nothing, say nothing, be nothing.
    ~ Elbert Hubbard

    Music provides one of the clearest examples of a much deeper relation between mathematics and human experience.
    Likes Numbly Aware liked this post

  2. #2
    Senior Member Ursa's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2015
    MBTI
    ESTJ
    Enneagram
    8w7
    Posts
    755

    Default

    I see sites such as these all the time as a weight lifter. They are attempting to sell you a product. In some cases, the product is a supposedly educational course. In other cases, the product is a supplement. In this case, the products are books. Do yourself a huge favor and leave this site.

    There is no such thing as adrenal fatigue. I see it referenced all the time on sites such as these, and yet Mayo Clinic states that adrenal fatigue is not an accepted medical diagnosis. Most of the people whom I know who complain about adrenal fatigue are either not eating enough calories, not sleeping enough, working out heavily seven days per week, or they are experiencing caffeine withdrawal symptoms. Physiologically, all of these make sense. Most of them for fairly obvious reasons, and the caffeine withdrawal because caffeine is an imposter that pretends to be adenosine, one of the chemicals responsible for your feelings of tiredness at the end of the day. Caffeine jams up your adenosine receptors like keys in locks, because it's so similar to adenosine; the actual adenosine 'keys' do not get to fit into the 'locks' because they are occupied. In other words, you get less adenosine. Instead, you get wired and then tired over time. The rest actually have symptoms better explained by actual medical conditions such as hypothyroidism. If you are experiencing chronic fatigue not otherwise explained by poor diet, drug or alcohol addictions (including caffeine), intentionally poor sleep, or not exercising more than twice a week, then you absolutely need to see a real doctor - there are a range of accepted and treatable medical conditions that cause fatigue.

    Nootropics? They are an entire industry. Of course someone wants to sell them to you. And as it happens, the only FDA-approved nootropics are prescription-only. Stay away from this stuff - and you don't need it anyhow.

    Talk to an actual doctor about what you read on this site. Then talk to an actual personal trainer. If you can afford it, research it on JSTOR as well.

    If you can't afford to spend the money, then BodyBuilding.com's articles are usually good. This site has all sorts of decent articles on fitness. But you should really talk to a doctor at some point.

    I hope this helps you.

  3. #3
    Senior Member nonsequitur's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    MBTI
    INTJ
    Enneagram
    512 sp/so
    Posts
    1,737

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by phobik View Post
    it'd be cool if someone with med/bio training could comment on the more technical stuff
    Didn't listen to the podcast, scrolled through the points. I'm a biochemist. I also lift, and did long distance running for a year. I see these kinds of sites all the time and generally ignore them because a lot of what they say doesn't make sense.

    I agree with @Ursa that this is nonsense concocted to sell products. Just wanted to address a few points:
    - How your lack of energy could be due to your blood pH level and how to check your pH.
    Utter nonsense. Your blood pH operates within a very narrow range, otherwise a lot of chemical reactions in your body (for e.g. oxygen exchange in red blood cells) would be disrupted. Generally this is within 0.05 of the "physiological" pH of 7.4. The body has several compensatory mechanisms (called 'buffering capacity') to keep blood pH within this range (known as 'homeostasis'), and generally self-corrects unless there's a serious problem (in which case you'd be in the hospital).

    There's a lot of nonsense out there about drinking 'alkaline water' to 'prevent cancer' because cancer cells thrive in an acidic environment. But again, it's stupid because your stomach is an acidic environment anyway, and the mild alkalinity of whatever water system they're selling you gets neutralised immediately. Also cancer cells live in what we call an acidic microenvironment. Meaning that the cells maintain acidity in the immediate area around the tumour, and the rest of the body is at 'normal' pH. Any attempt to alter the pH of a tumour microenvironment through blood pH is a fool's errand because you'll end up disrupting many other systems in the body before you can see any effect.

    You can temporarily increase pH of your blood by either infusing or ingesting a large amount of bicarbonate - athletes do this to increase buffering capacity of their blood against lactic acid. But this doesn't last more than a couple of hours (your body excretes it rapidly) and gives you a terrible stomach ache. Also has no effect on energy levels.

    Why you feel exhausted after a large meal and how to deal with this.
    This has been known forever, it's a glucose crash caused by insulin (ref. below).

    How eating less can give you an energy boost.
    You don't need to eat less, you just have to eat slow-digesting carbs in smaller amounts, and fill up on protein and fiber.

    The specific foods that promote better well-being and increased energy.
    Um. Are these stimulants? There's no one food that does this - food is a source of nutrients, and different foods have different nutritional profiles. There's no one specific food that has everything. That's why it's important to eat a wide variety of foods (vegetables in all colours, different types of fruit etc.) because that way you cover all of the different nutrients that the body needs for optimal function. I find the whole "superfood" thing ridiculous because of this. It's important to have variety, preferably with minimally processed foods.
    "How badly did you have to break it to make it care about people so much?"
    "That didn't break it. It's what made it work."

    "Any community that gets its laughs by pretending to be idiots will eventually be flooded by actual idiots who mistakenly believe that they're in good company." - Rene Descartes

    5w6 1w9 2w1, sp/so

  4. #4
    Senior Member prplchknz's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    MBTI
    yupp
    Posts
    29,467

    Default

    cocaine double your energy in 17 seconds!!!
    In no likes experiment.

    that is all

    i dunno what else to say so

  5. #5
    FRACTALICIOUS phobik's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Posts
    7,291

    Default

    nonsequitur, Ursa thank you for your input. what you point out makes a lot of sense.
    Do you have any thoughts on the inclusion effects of fasting (intermittent/occasional/regular) in on'es diet/lifestyle?
    To avoid criticism, do nothing, say nothing, be nothing.
    ~ Elbert Hubbard

    Music provides one of the clearest examples of a much deeper relation between mathematics and human experience.

  6. #6
    Senior Member RedAmazoneFriendZone's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2014
    MBTI
    ESFP
    Enneagram
    7w8 sx/sp
    Posts
    1,196

    Default

    Regular yoga practice makes more than just double your energy...
    No need for superficial stuff or poison to feel better.
    But yoga without practicing a certain philosophy or being in some unhealthy surrounding is totally useless. Like anything else. Useless to say !
    ALL THAT WE SEE OR SEEM TO BE IS BUT A DREAM WITHIN A DREAM

  7. #7
    Senior Member nonsequitur's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    MBTI
    INTJ
    Enneagram
    512 sp/so
    Posts
    1,737

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by phobik View Post
    Do you have any thoughts on the inclusion effects of fasting (intermittent/occasional/regular) in on'es diet/lifestyle?
    Ah, fasting. Could write books about this topic, but as with anything diet/nutrition, it really depends on what you're using it for.

    There are some who talk about using it to "reset their bodies" or "detoxify" and that is nonsense. But some have used it to effectively lose weight or lean out. What kind of fasting program will be most effective is dependent on your own physiology, lifestyle and goals. I'm reluctant to go into more detail until I know exactly what you're asking for because this topic can be approached from quite a few different angles.

    Generally speaking, guys tolerate it a lot better than girls, and this is down to differences in our physiology. I know 2 guys who do IF as a lifestyle (they do the Warrior diet) and they're ripped. I've tried a couple of fasting systems before and it was hell. I physically suffered with headaches and low energy, my period got really messed up, and I couldn't eat enough during my feeding window, my stomach just couldn't take it. It completely screwed with my training too. I find that my body does a lot better on a bodybuilder-like 5/6-meals-a-day system.

    So the question is - what do you want to use fasting for?
    "How badly did you have to break it to make it care about people so much?"
    "That didn't break it. It's what made it work."

    "Any community that gets its laughs by pretending to be idiots will eventually be flooded by actual idiots who mistakenly believe that they're in good company." - Rene Descartes

    5w6 1w9 2w1, sp/so

  8. #8
    FRACTALICIOUS phobik's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Posts
    7,291

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by nonsequitur View Post
    Ah, fasting. Could write books about this topic, but as with anything diet/nutrition, it really depends on what you're using it for.

    There are some who talk about using it to "reset their bodies" or "detoxify" and that is nonsense. But some have used it to effectively lose weight or lean out. What kind of fasting program will be most effective is dependent on your own physiology, lifestyle and goals. I'm reluctant to go into more detail until I know exactly what you're asking for because this topic can be approached from quite a few different angles.

    Generally speaking, guys tolerate it a lot better than girls, and this is down to differences in our physiology. I know 2 guys who do IF as a lifestyle (they do the Warrior diet) and they're ripped. I've tried a couple of fasting systems before and it was hell. I physically suffered with headaches and low energy, my period got really messed up, and I couldn't eat enough during my feeding window, my stomach just couldn't take it. It completely screwed with my training too. I find that my body does a lot better on a bodybuilder-like 5/6-meals-a-day system.

    So the question is - what do you want to use fasting for?
    Never heard of the warrior diet ( ironically drama Wikipedia:Articles for deletion/Warrior diet - Wikipedia) although my diet and lifestyle is probably close, minus the 4 hour restriction and intense workout, mostly eat when hungry, light workout when in the mood, overall I can go without eating from 12-20h (sleep included), but as a byproduct, not calculated, so was wondering on the intentional IF pros/cons.
    To avoid criticism, do nothing, say nothing, be nothing.
    ~ Elbert Hubbard

    Music provides one of the clearest examples of a much deeper relation between mathematics and human experience.

  9. #9
    Senior Member nonsequitur's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    MBTI
    INTJ
    Enneagram
    512 sp/so
    Posts
    1,737

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by phobik View Post
    Never heard of the warrior diet ( ironically drama Wikipedia:Articles for deletion/Warrior diet - Wikipedia) although my diet and lifestyle is probably close, minus the 4 hour restriction and intense workout, mostly eat when hungry, light workout when in the mood, overall I can go without eating from 12-20h (sleep included), but as a byproduct, not calculated, so was wondering on the intentional IF pros/cons.
    Yeah I hadn't heard about the warrior diet either until one of those guys told me about it. Sounded like hogwash to me, but they say that it works for them so I'm not gonna tell them not to do it.

    There are several different IF protocols - generally it isn't considered fasting unless the time of not-eating exceeds 14h. It's not just not-eating though, this also includes anything with calories (e.g. soda).

    So among the most popular there's the Warrior diet as I mentioned above, the 16/8 protocol by Martin Berkhan from LeanGains, a 24 h fast 1-2 times a week by John Berardi/Brad Pilon. Then there are the more extreme ones involving fasting for 2 weeks up to a month. There's quite a bit of speculation about what happens biochemically but in the literature there's no real consensus. It's pretty hard to study because (as you can imagine) "normal" people aren't willing to fast for that long. The people who are studied tend to be what we call "terminally trained" athletes, i.e. people who work out in a very specific way to maximise the effects of their training. This in turn affects their metabolism and reactions to fasting. So I wouldn't extrapolate those findings to the general population.

    Generally speaking (ignoring the small sample sizes) it's been shown that with "normal, healthy" males, fasting >16h can increase insulin sensitivity, which would aid management of conditions such as diabetes. But again, most of the IF protocols generally call for strict limits on what you eat and how you work out. By skipping a single meal you can cut calories, and that's how a lot of guys lose weight. But you also need to control how you eat (generally the emphasis, as always, is on lean protein and loads of vegetables) so that you lose more fat than muscle. Lifting heavy also helps to keep the muscle. Those guys on the warrior diet whom I know not only lift heavy several times a week (and supplement with several things like Creatine and BCAAs) but also eat a very very specific diet that includes a crazy amount of protein. So there are many, many variables here that will determine if it works for you.
    "How badly did you have to break it to make it care about people so much?"
    "That didn't break it. It's what made it work."

    "Any community that gets its laughs by pretending to be idiots will eventually be flooded by actual idiots who mistakenly believe that they're in good company." - Rene Descartes

    5w6 1w9 2w1, sp/so

  10. #10
    Senior Member Ursa's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2015
    MBTI
    ESTJ
    Enneagram
    8w7
    Posts
    755

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by phobik View Post
    nonsequitur, Ursa thank you for your input. what you point out makes a lot of sense.
    Do you have any thoughts on the inclusion effects of fasting (intermittent/occasional/regular) in on'es diet/lifestyle?
    Talk to your doctor about fasting and how it relates to your unique physiology and fitness goals. For example, I should not fast because I have hypoglycemia. And if your fitness goal is to gain muscle, then you should not fast because muscles are built on protein and calories. Whether you should fast or not is subjective and best determined by an expert.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
Single Sign On provided by vBSSO