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  1. #1
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    Default Quitting Smoking Tips?

    My addiction to tobacco/ nicotine is one of my least favorite aspects of my being, so I've been putting forth a very real effort to quit for well over a year now. Tips? The less conventional the better, for I have tried virtually every well known method before except the following, which I am completely unwilling to try on account of how certain I am that they will cause me failure: the patch, gum, or any other replacements, gradually cutting down, and hypnosis.

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    Super Ape Luke O's Avatar
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    I suppose the first question is, why do you like smoking?

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    Quote Originally Posted by Luke O View Post
    I suppose the first question is, why do you like smoking?
    Because nicotine is a highly addictive chemical...
    Likes Hard, five sounds liked this post

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    Quote Originally Posted by Luke O View Post
    I suppose the first question is, why do you like smoking?
    The Disney geek is right

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    Quote Originally Posted by DisneyGeek View Post
    Because nicotine is a highly addictive chemical...
    I know! Seriously speaking though, is it more for pleasure, habit, fitting in with others, catharsis, focus etc.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Luke O View Post
    I know! Seriously speaking though, is it more for pleasure, habit, fitting in with others, catharsis, focus etc.
    Catharsis huh? Yeah I had to do a swift Google search to input that definition into my mind but now that I'm aware of its meaning, I agree with you 100%. No different from most other substances, just a mask.

  7. #7
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    Here are a couple old posts of mine from an old thread back in 2012:

    *****************

    I smoked 2 packs a day for 30 years. I tried quitting over and over. To finally stop once and for all, I chewed huge amounts of nicotine gum all day and even chewed it as I was going to sleep. Furthermore I kept on chewing it for the next 5 years after my last cigarette. I didn't want to stop the nicotine gum until cigarettes were so far back in my past that I couldn't even imagine picking up a cigarette again. It's now been 10 years since my last cigarette (and five years since my last piece of nicotine gum).

    *****************

    People have different levels of addict-ability.

    With smoking, the theory is as follows:

    Nicotine is a mild stimulant. Some people are borderline depressed, and they use the stimulant effect of nicotine in their cigarettes to medicate themselves into a better mood, i.e., they use that nicotine boost to power them through the day. So they are going to tend to be more heavily addicted. Take away their cigarettes, and they are going to continue to crave (feel the absense of) that helpful nicotine stimulant for weeks, months, or even years.

    By comparison, other people don’t specifically need the stimulant effect of their cigarettes. Their mood is probably fine or at least doesn't bounce around a whole lot. They’re just smoking for the taste, and they don’t necessarily get much from the stimulant boost. So they can quit relatively easily. Once they get over the hump on the nicotine addiction itself (about 3-5 days), they don’t particularly miss the nicotine boost. Effectively, they can take cigarettes or leave them.

    Looking at the first group again (borderline depressed and deeply in need of a long-term stimulant boost): One smoking-cessation strategy involves seeing a doctor and getting put on a mild anti-depressant so that the quitting smoker won't need the stimulant effect provided by the cigarettes. But then you have to play around with finding the best anti-depressant, dosing strategies, and how long to stay on the anti-depressant. A lot of people don’t want to do that; I didn’t.

    In my case, I basically self-medicated with the nicotine gum and played around with the dosing of the nicotine stimulant myself. I used the nicotine gum and just let enough time go by to effectively “grow out of” the smoking habit. After a while I just didn’t see cigarettes as something I needed anymore.

    ***********
    In your typical cigarette, here’s how tar and nicotine work together:

    Tar provides the taste/flavor and the harmful (cancer-causing) elements;
    Nicotine provides the addictive element and acts as a mild stimulant

    Take out the tars, and what you have left is nicotine: highly addictive, but otherwise a harmless mild stimulant.

    When nicotine gums and patches first came out, you could only obtain them by prescription: Nicotine is so highly addictive that everyone assumed it must be harmful as well.

    But now nicotine can be obtained OTC and is pretty much uncontrolled (I think you have to be 18 years old to buy it). Health authorities still don’t want kids to get hold of it because of its high addictiveness and expense; but as of five years ago when I last checked, long-term medical studies showed that nicotine use alone didn’t result in any harmful health effects.

    So some people go ahead and chew the gum for its quick stimulant effect. It gives a noticeable boost like a little cup of coffee. But it’s kind of expensive, and like any addictive drug you have to wean yourself off it gradually if you decide that you're tired of paying for such a habit.

    As for me: It was great for getting off cigarettes. When I used it in place of cigarettes, I missed the flavor of cigarettes, but my health improved instantly since I wasn’t clogging my lungs with tar. Meantime I didn’t experience any withdrawal symptoms from the lack of cigarettes since I could have all the nicotine I wanted via the gum.

    Five years later I was still perfectly healthy with the gum, but I knew that I really didn’t need such an expensive habit anymore. So I took about a year and weaned myself off the gum slowly. I chewed nicotine gums at specific times of the day, and then every few weeks I would knock out one gum-chewing session or substitute cinnamon gum for the nicotine gum.

    These days I’m still prone to chew on a toothpick occasionally. And cigarettes still smell good to me when I pass a smoker. Sometimes I just want to be near a lit cigarette and enjoy the scent and the memories. But cigarettes (and gum) just aren’t part of my self-picture anymore; I couldn’t seriously imagine picking a cigarette up and lighting it and returning to all the negative burdens that come with those things.

    *****************

    Thread: I can't stop smoking
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    Quote Originally Posted by YUI View Post
    Here are a couple old posts of mine from an old thread back in 2012:

    *****************

    I smoked 2 packs a day for 30 years. I tried quitting over and over. To finally stop once and for all, I chewed huge amounts of nictotine gum all day and even chewed it as I was going to sleep. Furthermore I kept on chewing it for the next 5 years after my last cigarette. I didn't want to stop the nicotine gum until cigarettes were so far back in my past that I couldn't even imagine picking up a cigarette again. It's now been 10 years since my last cigarette (and five years since my last piece of nicotine gum).

    *****************

    People have different levels of addict-ability.

    With smoking, the theory is as follows:

    Nicotine is a mild stimulant. Some people are borderline depressed, and they use the stimulant effect of nicotine in their cigarettes to medicate themselves into a better mood, i.e., they use that nicotine boost to power them through the day. So they are going to tend to be more heavily addicted. Take away their cigarettes, and they are going to continue to crave (feel the absense of) that helpful nicotine stimulant for weeks, months, or even years.

    By comparison, other people don’t specifically need the stimulant effect of their cigarettes. Their mood is probably fine or at least doesn't bounce around a whole lot. They’re just smoking for the taste, and they don’t necessarily get much from the stimulant boost. So they can quit relatively easily. Once they get over the hump on the nicotine addiction itself (about 3-5 days), they don’t particularly miss the nicotine boost. Effectively, they can take cigarettes or leave them.

    Looking at the first group again (borderline depressed and deeply in need of a long-term stimulant boost): One smoking-cessation strategy involves seeing a doctor and getting put on a mild anti-depressant so that the quitting smoker won't need the stimulant effect provided by the cigarettes. But then you have to play around with finding the best anti-depressant, dosing strategies, and how long to stay on the anti-depressant. A lot of people don’t want to do that; I didn’t.

    In my case, I basically self-medicated with the nicotine gum and played around with the dosing of the nicotine stimulant myself. I used the nicotine gum and just let enough time go by to effectively “grow out of” the smoking habit. After a while I just didn’t see cigarettes as something I needed anymore.

    ***********
    In your typical cigarette, here’s how tar and nicotine work together:

    Tar provides the taste/flavor and the harmful (cancer-causing) elements;
    Nicotine provides the addictive element and acts as a mild stimulant

    Take out the tars, and what you have left is nicotine: highly addictive, but otherwise a harmless mild stimulant.

    When nicotine gums and patches first came out, you could only obtain them by prescription: Nicotine is so highly addictive that everyone assumed it must be harmful as well.

    But now nicotine can be obtained OTC and is pretty much uncontrolled (I think you have to be 18 years old to buy it). Health authorities still don’t want kids to get hold of it because of its high addictiveness and expense; but as of five years ago when I last checked, long-term medical studies showed that nicotine use alone didn’t result in any harmful health effects.

    So some people go ahead and chew the gum for its quick stimulant effect. It gives a noticeable boost like a little cup of coffee. But it’s kind of expensive, and like any addictive drug you have to wean yourself off it gradually if you decide that you're tired of paying for such a habit.

    As for me: It was great for getting off cigarettes. When I used it in place of cigarettes, I missed the flavor of cigarettes, but my health improved instantly since I wasn’t clogging my lungs with tar. Meantime I didn’t experience any withdrawal symptoms from the lack of cigarettes since I could have all the nicotine I wanted via the gum.

    Five years later I was still perfectly healthy with the gum, but I knew that I really didn’t need such an expensive habit anymore. So I took about a year and weaned myself off the gum slowly. I chewed nicotine gums at specific times of the day, and then every few weeks I would knock out one gum-chewing session or substitute cinnamon gum for the nicotine gum.

    These days I’m still prone to chew on a toothpick occasionally. And cigarettes still smell good to me when I pass a smoker. Sometimes I just want to be near a lit cigarette and enjoy the scent and the memories. But cigarettes (and gum) just aren’t part of my self-picture anymore; I couldn’t seriously imagine picking a cigarette up and lighting it and returning to all the negative burdens that come with those things.

    *****************

    Thread: I can't stop smoking
    Wow lots of info! Much appreciated. When I'm better rested, I will read your post in detail and hopefully find your advice practical enough to put into practice.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jet Stream View Post
    Wow lots of info! Much appreciated. When I'm better rested, I will read your post in detail and hopefully find your advice practical enough to put into practice.
    BTW, in my old post I said:

    ...I chewed huge amounts of nicotine gum all day and even chewed it as I was going to sleep...
    Just to clarify, I routinely chewed 2-3 pieces of gum at a time, and sometimes as much as 4-5 pieces of gum at a time. Just keep on popping gum into your face until you're so high on nicotine that you can't even imagine wanting a cigarette.

    After about 15 minutes of chewing, the gum will become flavorless and you spit it out. That should take care of you for an hour or two. Eventually the nicotine starts leaving your bloodstream and the desire for a smoke starts coming back. So you start jamming gum back in your face again. Repeat all day long for five years.

    It means carrying a lot of gum around with you at all times. But it works.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jet Stream View Post
    My addiction to tobacco/ nicotine is one of my least favorite aspects of my being, so I've been putting forth a very real effort to quit for well over a year now. Tips? The less conventional the better, for I have tried virtually every well known method before except the following, which I am completely unwilling to try on account of how certain I am that they will cause me failure: the patch, gum, or any other replacements, gradually cutting down, and hypnosis.
    Wellbutrin ftw
    And so long as you haven’t experienced this: to die and so to grow,
    you are only a troubled guest on the dark earth

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