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  1. #11
    i love skylights's Avatar
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    @SophiaDeep... hey... I've been there too... I started restricting my eating to around a can of soup a day in middle school because I got teased for my muscular legs. I dropped a lot of weight... then I started cracking and binging because I was so hungry... which led to starve/binge cycles. Then I stopped starving myself but couldn't stop the binging... I got really heavy in high school. Then I went on ADHD medicine and got slender again. When I went to college... I stopped the ADHD meds... and having lots of healthy food prepared for me and readily available in the cafeteria helped me start to eat normally again, and the whole big adventure of college was such a time-consuming, mental energy consuming process that it helped take my focus off my body and my eating. The binges stopped being so frequent. Later, I found myself overeating instead, and gained weight again, but my relationship with food has been getting better year by year. I'm getting back to healthy eating now and the starve/binge cycles have mostly waned. A lot of it was getting through a period of time without feeling like I HAD to restrict or binge to be okay. I started learning things that substitute for the emotional comfort of binges - long hot showers, good books, sex, going out with friends, yoga. It's hard to overcome, but try to trust yourself. Your "normal" setting is still within you and will always be. You have to break the "programming" that is pushing you to binge again and again despite desiring otherwise.

  2. #12
    royal member Rasofy's Avatar
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    I'd suggest a detox week to get your metabolism to normal levels. Lots of tea, and avoid high GI food like the plague.

  3. #13

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    Quote Originally Posted by skylights View Post
    @SophiaDeep... hey... I've been there too... I started restricting my eating to around a can of soup a day in middle school because I got teased for my muscular legs. I dropped a lot of weight... then I started cracking and binging because I was so hungry... which led to starve/binge cycles. Then I stopped starving myself but couldn't stop the binging... I got really heavy in high school. Then I went on ADHD medicine and got slender again. When I went to college... I stopped the ADHD meds... and having lots of healthy food prepared for me and readily available in the cafeteria helped me start to eat normally again, and the whole big adventure of college was such a time-consuming, mental energy consuming process that it helped take my focus off my body and my eating. The binges stopped being so frequent. Later, I found myself overeating instead, and gained weight again, but my relationship with food has been getting better year by year. I'm getting back to healthy eating now and the starve/binge cycles have mostly waned. A lot of it was getting through a period of time without feeling like I HAD to restrict or binge to be okay. I started learning things that substitute for the emotional comfort of binges - long hot showers, good books, sex, going out with friends, yoga. It's hard to overcome, but try to trust yourself. Your "normal" setting is still within you and will always be. You have to break the "programming" that is pushing you to binge again and again despite desiring otherwise.
    I used to be really bad with my eating habits at middle school. I had to take hormonal pills on my thyroid and I gained much weight because of them. I was in this cycle of restricting and binging before, and as binges became more frequent I gained a lot of weight at highschool. But when I stopped taking the hormonal pills, I lost like 5 pounds without even trying and I started to like it, so for the past 1 and half year I was restricting and occasionally I ate nornamly, but having a piece of chocolate was the biggest taboo. And so now I just started to binge and I really don't know what happend, or what I miss, because I have friends, sex and all this stuff .

  4. #14

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    Quote Originally Posted by Rasofy View Post
    I'd suggest a detox week to get your metabolism to normal levels. Lots of tea, and avoid high GI food like the plague.
    I was thinking about this, good idea

  5. #15
    You have a choice! 21%'s Avatar
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    I'm not going to pretend to know what it's like to diet/binge, but I started trying to have more 'food awareness' about a year ago. It's just amazing how much bad food there is out there -- even things you thought were healthy! I think eating the right food helps you feel satisfied longer. It's about getting into the right mind state for me so that just eating healthy is rewarding in itself.

    Good luck!
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  6. #16
    i love skylights's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by SophiaDeep View Post
    I used to be really bad with my eating habits at middle school. I had to take hormonal pills on my thyroid and I gained much weight because of them. I was in this cycle of restricting and binging before, and as binges became more frequent I gained a lot of weight at highschool. But when I stopped taking the hormonal pills, I lost like 5 pounds without even trying and I started to like it, so for the past 1 and half year I was restricting and occasionally I ate nornamly, but having a piece of chocolate was the biggest taboo. And so now I just started to binge and I really don't know what happend, or what I miss, because I have friends, sex and all this stuff .
    Oh, I didn't mean those things are missing from your life. What I have read about food addiction suggests that it is akin to any other addiction where it becomes a pleasurable process and one that we come to rely on for the "high" - psychological, emotional, physical. The "fix" floods our minds with reward signals, so it feels good and we want to do it again, even though on a purely cognitive level we know it is bad.

    At least for me, I think the binges were about feeling controlled - feeling like I could never have everything I wanted because of the food restrictions - and just breaking the restrictions and taking everything I wanted. I still remember one of the first times I ever did it, I ate an entire box of cherry Pop-Tarts, because those were my favorite and I hated that I "wasn't allowed" to have them because they were "bad". It was about not being boxed in. It was about the emotional satisfaction of being able to take and take and take. Personally I still fall prey to it every once in a while after a particularly frustrating time dealing with navigating around unhealthy but appealing food. I read a book at some point that suggested taking a period of time to really eat whatever you want, which is sort of a scary thing because you can confront what an endless pit your stomach really can be and how much you really can gain - but when I did it I also found that while it was pig heaven for the first few days, it got kind of gross and disorienting as time went on, because I wasn't structuring my eating around anything but my desires. So, though I don't know if it'd work for everyone, it helped me recalibrate to listening to my body again.

    But, even once the food restrictions were gone, there was still that "empty hole" that I associated with binging. I had friends too, sex too, pleasant things in my life. It wasn't about that stuff... just about acknowledging the gnawing feeling of loneliness and emptiness and yearning and ability to ever be full/fulfilled that sometimes comes with being human, that can't really be filled by anything except affirmation of life and meaning. So that's how I try to confront it now.

    Whether or not that is the case for you, too... I don't know. But if I feel like binging, then it's that immersion in physical comfort that I'm seeking, something to confront the void of existence. So I try to go find it elsewhere through other mediums.

  7. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by skylights View Post
    Oh, I didn't mean those things are missing from your life. What I have read about food addiction suggests that it is akin to any other addiction where it becomes a pleasurable process and one that we come to rely on for the "high" - psychological, emotional, physical. The "fix" floods our minds with reward signals, so it feels good and we want to do it again, even though on a purely cognitive level we know it is bad.

    At least for me, I think the binges were about feeling controlled - feeling like I could never have everything I wanted because of the food restrictions - and just breaking the restrictions and taking everything I wanted. It was about not being boxed in. It was about the emotional satisfaction of being able to take and take and take. Personally I still fall prey to it every once in a while after a particularly frustrating time dealing with navigating around unhealthy but appealing food. I read a book at some point that suggested taking a period of time to really eat whatever you want, which is sort of a scary thing because you can confront what an endless pit your stomach really can be and how much you really can gain - but when I did it I also found that while it was pig heaven for the first few days, it got kind of gross and disorienting as time went on, because I wasn't structuring my eating around anything but my desires. So, though I don't know if it'd work for everyone, that helped me recalibrate.

    Once the food restrictions were gone, there was still that "empty hole" from binging. I had friends too, sex too, pleasant things in my life. It wasn't about that stuff... just about acknowledging the gnawing feeling of loneliness and emptiness and yearning that sometimes comes with being human, that can't really be filled by anything except affirmation of life and meaning. So that's how I try to confront it now.

    Whether or not that is the case for you, too... I don't know. But if I feel like binging, then it's that immersion in physical comfort that I'm seeking. So I try to go find it elsewhere through other mediums.
    +1 to all of that.
    You hem me in -- behind and before;
    you have laid your hand upon me.
    Such knowledge is too wonderful for me,
    too lofty for me to attain.

  8. #18
    Senior Member the state i am in's Avatar
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    i think the most helpful thing for me is trying to notice how i feel after i eat different foods. and to use that as information to help me pay more attention to an organized story about my digestion, which, like money, is something we all have to kind of manage with consistent attention and awareness.

    i definitely stress eat. it happens because of desire (an sx gluttony and feeling that i should always get the best and get everything i want), and also because of a feeling of being in control in some way. the overeating happens as well also because of the numbing out of anxiety that can happen when you syphon off so much energy that could ignite in the mind into digesting a mountain of food.

    two things that can be really helpful are trying to rebalance your palate, which to me means eating a few handfuls of bitter, leafy greens every morning, maybe some savory hot cereal with chicken stock, and drinking kombucha or having a couple of naturally fermented, high probiotic pickled foods. we lose our sense of bitter, we lose our sense of balance. the ideas of what will satisfy us get a bit distorted, and we often develop a sugar habit. the second thing for me is drinking herbal tea. it is a positive ritual that brings me back into my body, has nutritive value (i like yogi teas, that have stress relieving adaptogens like licorice root in them), and are even better if you add a bit of fresh lemon. sipping is good. sensation is good. slowness is good. noticing how it feels, and letting go of some of your compulsive energy, noticing what arises when you stop perpetuating it and instead choose to observe what has become involuntary for you, is just grounding. a bit of conscious movement can be good too.

    i know for me doing these things can help me aim for the place where i can feel myself more, which in turn gives me a much better chance at directly confronting the needs that have struggled to get met. this is really helpful because it allows you to empathize with yourself bc you realize that ultimately you're just taking a wildly indirect, ineffective strategy to meet a need, and if you just stay engaged and aware, you may be able to solve this problem now that you've been able to so much better define it for yourself.

  9. #19
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    I was chronically overweight in my twenties (about 12-15kgs excess) and could not shift it no matter who much gym work I did or how carefully I ate. Then once I gave up trying to be my normal weight (in my 30's) I lost it all in 3 months and havent struggled with my weight since. Two important things happened to me....

    1. I lost the stress I was constantly feeling about my weight. Stress hormones when chronic in the body do cause you to seek out binge food and also put on weight. If you have a lot of free ranging cortisol in your body you wont be able to lose anything.

    2. I stopped eating what people told me I should eat, and just reached for the food my body told me I should eat. It seems scary at first, especially if you fear you'll end up living on chocolate cake or something. But actually our bodies are smarter than that. I didnt even notice at the time but what I ended up eating the most of was steamed vegetables and proteins and I hardly ever ate any grain or sugar. In 3 months with only walking as an exercise I went from 65kgs to 50kgs and have stayed there ever since.

    There is a lot of misinformation about diet, most of it spread by health organisations. We no longer know how to eat or what to eat anymore. I personally believe that there isn't one diet thats right for all. Our bodies are individuals and while I blow up like a balloon if I eat grain, others can eat it and be healthy. We know what our best food is when we eat a natural diet (unprocessed foods) and listen to our bodies which do signal to us what it wants as food. My body craves protein and carbs from vegetables. Starchy carbs like grain bloat me and make me feel lethargic so I don't eat them. My way is unscientific and a lot of people will argue its wrong, I don't care. Its the only thing which has gotten my body to its natural state and that is proof enough for me. I am healthy now, carrying around 15kgs of excess weight wasn't.

  10. #20

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    Thank you guys so I just guess I should less concentrate on my body and more on other things in my life. It's just really hard, I've never been overweight (acording to official charts) in my life, but I used to be chubby during high shcool and I felt bad about it. It just felt so good when I lost 30lbs and got into being underweight, it was like my dream was comming true, it's just hard for me to accept this is going to be my past...I am still good BMI 18,7 but what bothers me is that the last time I started to binge eating from BMI 17 I went to BMI 23 in an year...It was terrible and I just don't want to end up like this again. I like being skinny, it's just hard to manage it. My weight was 93lbs before holiday and now it's around 101, but getting groser and it's going to be 130 soon if I won't change it, because I've been once there and I know how much I can binge...

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