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  1. #21
    Entertaining Cracker five sounds's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rail Tracer View Post
    @decrescendo It's a gag reflex of certain foods right? I am guessing your tongue thinks of the food as foreign or invasive and wants you to spit it out (because the tongue isn't used to the taste/texture.)

    Have you tried slowly getting used to the texture? Or anything that has that remote texture will just set it off?

    I am asking because I developed a gag reflex when it comes to drinking milk (partly because of the taste and texture) even though I never had one until the end of high school. I had to forcefully make myself drink it. Like, a glass of milk would take me forever to drink, but a bowl of ice cream I can down in a few minutes kind of difference. If I had to drink milk, it needs to changed taste or texture for me to drink it in a few seconds.
    they do this kind of thing in feeding/swallowing therapy for people with texture aversions. slowly introduce textures. mix them in with other more palatable ones. document how much, how frequently, and what happened.
    You hem me in -- behind and before;
    you have laid your hand upon me.
    Such knowledge is too wonderful for me,
    too lofty for me to attain.

  2. #22
    Freaking Ratchet Rail Tracer's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by five sounds View Post
    they do this kind of thing in feeding/swallowing therapy for people with texture aversions. slowly introduce textures. mix them in with other more palatable ones. document how much, how frequently, and what happened.
    Yes, that is the type of thing I was talking about. Mixing things so that you get used to a certain taste or texture on its own. It would be like drinking chocolate/strawberry milk instead of regular milk and then moving onto regular milk once the tongue adapts.

    However, I don't know how bad is it for decresendo considering it is something that has affected her(him?) since 3. Something like that takes a lot more than my aversion of drinking raw milk.

  3. #23
    Senior Member Retmeishka's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by decrescendo View Post
    What I'm mainly concerned with are the more subtle effects; sometimes it seems to be like my organic self was frozen in some other dimension when I started medication and went on living an artificially sustained life in another, and I worry I can't wake that self up again and integrate the two dimensions.
    Yeah, you said it's like your organic self was frozen in some other dimension while the rest of you went on living. I know someone who says that he feels 'dead inside,' and he describes it as though some part of his soul actually died, permanently, something spiritual. He says he has no emotions at all, except remorse. It was after he went on several psychiatric drugs. I've tried to explain to him that I'm sure this feeling is happening because of the drugs, but... it's a hard subject to talk about.

    There are websites where people talk about their struggles to quit using psychiatric meds, and how in some ways after they quit, they do 'wake up' again, but in other ways, sometimes the effects of the drugs linger for a very long time. I myself have some unusual theories for why the effects linger after they quit the drugs, based on my own experiences. But it could possibly permanently alter people's nerves and brains too, in some way.

    It's really sad because the drugs make people unable to feel their subtle senses and subtle emotions. Sure, they help a person get through the day. I have chronic fatigue, and I use lots of caffeine, and even something as ordinary as caffeine makes me less aware of my own emotions and their nuances.

    Those subtle effects actually matter. They are important. Doctors, and a lot of people, behave as though 'Everything Is Fine' so long as your arms aren't ripped off, you're not coughing up a lung, there's no visible blood, outwardly your physical body looks normal. They see only an external physical object, and the external physical object looks fine, and therefore there's nothing to worry about. The physical object of your body is still walking and talking, so there's nothing left to fix, they say. If you try to tell them that you're feeling some sensation you don't like, that's just a 'first world problem' (as you said above earlier in the thread). Doctors can fix a broken leg, but they don't know how to fix weird internal sensations that you don't like, and they don't give much priority to fixing those things, and they just ignore you if you tell them. (That's my experience.) Or they argue and tell you that you're imagining it, that it's hypochondria.

    I'm glad you didn't have severe withdrawal from Sertraline when you went off it.

    People have depression for a lot of reasons (and anxiety, and other mental/emotional phenomena). Nowadays everyone just tells you to take a pill so that you can force yourself to keep going, without solving the original problems. An unknown something caused your body to get depressed/anxious/tired in the first place. It's possible to find the cause and remove it so the depression/anxiety stops happening, without pills.

  4. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by Retmeishka View Post
    Yeah, you said it's like your organic self was frozen in some other dimension while the rest of you went on living. I know someone who says that he feels 'dead inside,' and he describes it as though some part of his soul actually died, permanently, something spiritual. He says he has no emotions at all, except remorse. It was after he went on several psychiatric drugs. I've tried to explain to him that I'm sure this feeling is happening because of the drugs, but... it's a hard subject to talk about.

    There are websites where people talk about their struggles to quit using psychiatric meds, and how in some ways after they quit, they do 'wake up' again, but in other ways, sometimes the effects of the drugs linger for a very long time. I myself have some unusual theories for why the effects linger after they quit the drugs, based on my own experiences. But it could possibly permanently alter people's nerves and brains too, in some way.

    It's really sad because the drugs make people unable to feel their subtle senses and subtle emotions. Sure, they help a person get through the day. I have chronic fatigue, and I use lots of caffeine, and even something as ordinary as caffeine makes me less aware of my own emotions and their nuances.

    Those subtle effects actually matter. They are important. Doctors, and a lot of people, behave as though 'Everything Is Fine' so long as your arms aren't ripped off, you're not coughing up a lung, there's no visible blood, outwardly your physical body looks normal. They see only an external physical object, and the external physical object looks fine, and therefore there's nothing to worry about. The physical object of your body is still walking and talking, so there's nothing left to fix, they say. If you try to tell them that you're feeling some sensation you don't like, that's just a 'first world problem' (as you said above earlier in the thread). Doctors can fix a broken leg, but they don't know how to fix weird internal sensations that you don't like, and they don't give much priority to fixing those things, and they just ignore you if you tell them. (That's my experience.) Or they argue and tell you that you're imagining it, that it's hypochondria.

    I'm glad you didn't have severe withdrawal from Sertraline when you went off it.

    People have depression for a lot of reasons (and anxiety, and other mental/emotional phenomena). Nowadays everyone just tells you to take a pill so that you can force yourself to keep going, without solving the original problems. An unknown something caused your body to get depressed/anxious/tired in the first place. It's possible to find the cause and remove it so the depression/anxiety stops happening, without pills.
    I know. What I really don't understand is why doctors / mental health practitioners have been telling me that phases of sadness, mild depression, etc. are normal and psychologically based, but that somehow when it gets bad, it's a neurological malfunction. There's some mysterious tipping point, apparently, which they have no desire to either analyze or explain.

    I've asked my doctor about this twice so far and she isn't remotely open to it, saying stuff like "Do you not trust me?" "I'm your doctor. I wouldn't prescribe you something if I wasn't sure it was safe." Like, you're my physician. I trust you 100% with the medical stuff, and there are definitely
    physical repercussions and stressors, but it's not at the root of what I'm dealing with.

    I'm not so alarmed by what your friend said because I doubt it's purely a function of the medication. Of course if something is preventing you from digging into feelings you need to address, it's likely you're doing to feel that way for the time being. Doesn't necessarily mean you've lost a part of yourself forever.

    It's good to talk to someone with the same concerns. Thanks for sharing your thoughts, @Retmeishka.

  5. #25
    Freaking Ratchet Rail Tracer's Avatar
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    I just found the term for the food issue

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Selective_eating_disorder

    Basically, there is either a phobia of eating a certain type of food/texture/color or that the person just doesn't like a certain food/texture/color so he/she avoids the food.

    One of the primary ways to try to get out of this habit is to reward one's self for getting through with eating a certain aversion. Reward oneself for eating a food that he/she doesn't like with a food that he/she DOES like even if it is a small progress. Once the person gets used to the food/texture there is less of a need to reward because the person has gotten used to the texture and it has become common.

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