User Tag List

First 34567 Last

Results 41 to 50 of 132

  1. #41
    Senior Member Chaotic Harmony's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    MBTI
    ENFP
    Enneagram
    9w1 sx
    Posts
    1,436

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Marmotini View Post
    Nope.

    I read an article in L.A. Yoga that stated that it's really not enough to just go to the gym and get on the walking machine or what have you if your ass sits at a desk 10 hours a day, and advised that people constantly attempt to stand up or move around while working at a desk job, taking the stairs, etc.

    No, it's not just about type of exercise, it's sum total of time being sedentary versus being active.
    This is why I get up every hour and make a lap around campus or just stand up at my desk and stretch. I hate sitting.


  2. #42
    reborn PeaceBaby's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    MBTI
    INFP
    Enneagram
    937 so/sx
    Posts
    6,226

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by fidelia View Post
    I think you have to take into account the emotional role that food plays for some people ...
    So I think cultural (or subculture) norms play a role...
    In addition, your exposure earlier in life to physical exercise influences how much of a role you think it should play in your life...
    Yes, I agree to all of that. But at the fundamental, bottom line level, it is still math. Your post helps explain some of the elements in the equation that make it harder for any given individual to lose weight, but losing weight is ultimately calories in vs calories out. Other aspects in the equation would include gender, genetic expression of genes that encode for metabolism, hormonal reactions to stress, possibly what your mother ate while carrying you and what you ate as a toddler, bad advice to follow fad diets etc. etc.

    Allergies also play a significant role in weight retention (particularly water, but also fat).
    Agreed. And as you say, that's not fat. Seeing it for what it was what ultimately solved that riddle.

    After discovering I was celiac (through a friend - I had been to about 10 doctors with no results and finally got tested for that at her suggestion) and going off gluten, I started losing weight with very little effort. I am still not at an ideal weight, but am also aware that I should be cutting out dairy entirely, as it is a problem for my guts too. Socially though, I find it difficult to be off both dairy and gluten on a long term basis.
    Yes, it is difficult. We feed cattle grain to fatten them up, so that initial weight loss when you first go GF is certainly tied into the abundance of calories found in grains. The key to not gaining it all back is to not replace all of the wheat things with rice or corn substitutions.

    Anyway, weight loss isn't solely about calories in and out, even though I think in our culture that is a significant issue and the sheer availability and cheapness of non-nutritious food makes the struggle worse, especially when coupled with stressful lifestyle and not much time.
    Edited to make better sense : Yes, weight loss is solely about calories in vs calories out, regardless of the myriad of other factors we take into account.

    There's not a single person who won't lose weight on a calorie-restricted diet. Even a calorie-restricted junk food diet. Even a diet that makes you sick due to allergies or other considerations.
    "Remember always that you not only have the right to be an individual, you have an obligation to be one."
    Eleanor Roosevelt


    "When people see some things as beautiful,
    other things become ugly.
    When people see some things as good,
    other things become bad."
    Lao Tzu, Tao Te Ching

  3. #43
    Senior Member Survive & Stay Free's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    MBTI
    ESTJ
    Enneagram
    9 so/sx
    Posts
    21,661

    Default

    Some people find losing weight and getting fit easy but they must've found the opposite easy too in order to have to have the experience of exercising and needing to lose weight in the first place.

    I dont think its all will power or assorted and associated vagaries when it comes to losing weight and gaining fitness, its not that easy, at the same time I dont think its impossible and people make a lot of excuses. I've never made excuses, I've always known I could or should do better but there's so many hours in the day and they cant all be spent working out and the day be a satisfactory day, at least for me.

  4. #44
    morose bourgeoisie
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    MBTI
    INFP
    Posts
    3,860

    Default

    I think it's important to develop a routine that you can stick to, rather than go too hard at first, burn out and quit. Just get yourself to the gym, or on the bike, or on the floor, or where ever you exercise.
    Same thing goes for food. try to get a salad instead of fries. Make new habits that you can stick to. then you can adjust the amount based on results and how you feel.
    I started eating a lot more fiber and smaller meals on most days of the week. I also greatly reduced sugar and most (but not all) fats.
    Most people use food as a reward, and you have to learn to stop this habit, or at least control it. You can still enjoy a piece of cake if you have delayed that gratification. Just remember that when you want to eat something really badly, you still can do that tomorrow instead of right now.
    Deep breathing is really important for calming yourself and staying on track, expecially when you're hungry (or think you are).
    Another trick: eat only until hunger goes away, and no more. this is not easy at a restaurant, but if you get in the habit of listening to your body, you will eat less naturally.
    2 cents...

  5. #45
    Senior Member Chaotic Harmony's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    MBTI
    ENFP
    Enneagram
    9w1 sx
    Posts
    1,436

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Stanton Moore View Post
    I think it's important to develop a routine that you can stick to, rather than go too hard at first, burn out and quit. Just get yourself to the gym, or on the bike, or on the floor, or where ever you exercise.
    Same thing goes for food. try to get a salad instead of fries. Make new habits that you can stick to. then you can adjust the amount based on results and how you feel.
    I started eating a lot more fiber and smaller meals on most days of the week. I also greatly reduced sugar and most (but not all) fats.
    Most people use food as a reward, and you have to learn to stop this habit, or at least control it. You can still enjoy a piece of cake if you have delayed that gratification. Just remember that when you want to eat something really badly, you still can do that tomorrow instead of right now.
    Deep breathing is really important for calming yourself and staying on track, expecially when you're hungry (or think you are).
    Another trick: eat only until hunger goes away, and no more. this is not easy at a restaurant, but if you get in the habit of listening to your body, you will eat less naturally.
    2 cents...
    At a restaurant, another good way to handle not overeating is to get a to go box and pack half the meal up. Most restaurants in the US serve far too large of portion sizes anyway. It's getting ridiculous.


  6. #46
    Honor Thy Inferior Such Irony's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    MBTI
    INtp
    Enneagram
    5w6 sp/so
    Socionics
    LII Ne
    Posts
    5,091

    Default

    Several reasons:

    People try too hard at first. Overexercising and giving up all their favorite foods. Not too difficult in the short term but difficult to keep up such a drastic change over a long term. As a result, people lose weight quickly at first only to gain it all back later.

    Lack of confidence. If you think you're going to fail, you probably will.

    Lack of support. If you're trying to live a healthier lifestyle and your family, roommates, etc. gorge on junk food and don't seem to care, it's more difficult then if you're with people who support your goals and help you along the way.

    Lack of time and convenience. Fast food is quicker than making a good wholesome meal. Working out takes time. It's not like you have to take out a huge chunk of your day out for it, only about 30 minutes or so but if you're working a really demanding job, have alot of other committments, kids to take care of, etc. That 30 minutes or so may not be so easy to squeeze in.
    INtp
    5w6 or 9w1 sp/so/sx, I think
    Ravenclaw/Hufflepuff
    Neutral Good
    LII-Ne




  7. #47
    Senior Member ceecee's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    MBTI
    INTJ
    Enneagram
    8w9
    Posts
    9,745

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Chaotic Harmony View Post
    At a restaurant, another good way to handle not overeating is to get a to go box and pack half the meal up. Most restaurants in the US serve far too large of portion sizes anyway. It's getting ridiculous.
    I think this reason is far too understated. We have no idea what a portion size even is until we start seeing it. Saying - a serving is the size of a deck of cards is all fine and well. Until you actually see it, you don't know. It's impossible to visualize, at least it was for me. I watch portion size more and watch what I eat less. Not to say eating a McDonalds cheeseburger every day is ok because it's small but if people saw the amounts they should eat, I think weight loss would be somewhat easier. And....people have got to start cooking for themselves. This is the only way to control what you're eating.
    I like to rock n' roll all night and *part* of every day. I usually have errands... I can only rock from like 1-3.

  8. #48
    Freaking Ratchet Rail Tracer's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Posts
    3,041

    Default

    Was contemplating whether to post or not. If anything sounds snarky or something, it was unintended

    Quote Originally Posted by PeaceBaby View Post
    Yes, I agree to all of that. But at the fundamental, bottom line level, it is still math. Your post helps explain some of the elements in the equation that make it harder for any given individual to lose weight, but losing weight is ultimately calories in vs calories out. Other aspects in the equation would include gender, genetic expression of genes that encode for metabolism, hormonal reactions to stress, possibly what your mother ate while carrying you and what you ate as a toddler,
    That is the gist of it, although I don't count calories. It takes me about 2200 (sedentary) to 3000(very active) to gain the weight I need. While some can easily get to that much calories in 1 or 2 meals, I tend to have a harder time. For someone like me, I always try to add an extra apple/orange to my meals (protein shake if I am exercising.) This principle can be applied to people trying to lose weight. But instead of taking away the apple, it would be slowly taking away the snacks, the ready-made/fast-food, or the easily-made foods. That doesn't mean that people trying to lose weight have to give it up though.

    The biggest offenders tend to be processed or canned food. So whenever I am buying food, I always look at the back of the label for a few things (Doesn't always apply with fruits, vegetables, and meat, but the portions can be guessed.)

    What I tend to look at:
    Calories
    Vitamins/Minerals...particularly Sodium (there is not an aisle at the supermarket where there are more items that have more potassium than sodium in it,) Potassium
    Simple Carbs vs Complex Carbs.
    "Regular" fats vs trans-fat(just because it says 0g trans-fat doesn't mean it is 0g.... companies have leeway in that if it is 5g or less, they can say that there is 0g of trans-fat)

    There is a whole plethora of things that I can say. Some may think a particular food is "healthy," but I see so much sodium added to the food, it might as well be junk.

    A big deal of the American Diet can be absolved by just looking at the label. I'd rather not fix my eating habits after I get diabetes, high blood pressure, or a heart attack.
    bad advice to follow fad diets etc. etc.
    Fad diets, or what people call diets in general, makes me cringe. Not only that, easy weight gain meal plans also make me cringe.

    For most of them, it takes the thinking out of the person trying to lose/gain weight out of the person's hands, and that is the last thing a person should do if he/she wants to sustain losing/gaining weight.

  9. #49
    Intriguing.... Quinlan's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    MBTI
    ISFP
    Enneagram
    9w1
    Socionics
    Booo
    Posts
    3,005

    Default

    In over/under feeding studies people react very differently to the exact same diet and exercise regime, some lose a lot some lose a little all the while their calorie intake and intentional exercise is being carefully controlled. Some people are just built to survive (or even thrive) on very little, either through their heritage (thrifty gene hypothesis) or their development in the womb and early childhood (babies with small birth weights tend to have a high set point in later life that overcompensates as a genetic response to what the body/genes see as an environment where food is scarce).
    Last edited by Quinlan; 03-09-2013 at 05:15 AM.
    Act your age not your enneagram number.

    Quinlan's Creations

  10. #50
    Senior Member Chaotic Harmony's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    MBTI
    ENFP
    Enneagram
    9w1 sx
    Posts
    1,436

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by ceecee View Post
    I think this reason is far too understated. We have no idea what a portion size even is until we start seeing it. Saying - a serving is the size of a deck of cards is all fine and well. Until you actually see it, you don't know. It's impossible to visualize, at least it was for me. I watch portion size more and watch what I eat less. Not to say eating a McDonalds cheeseburger every day is ok because it's small but if people saw the amounts they should eat, I think weight loss would be somewhat easier. And....people have got to start cooking for themselves. This is the only way to control what you're eating.
    My mom also pointed out that when she was younger the size of an actual meal at McDonald's was the size of what a Happy Meal is now. It's crazy how our portion sizes have doubled and tripled over time. It always kills me when I read a review of a restaurant and someone complains that the portion size is too small.


Similar Threads

  1. Why is it ok for you to correct others?
    By Evolving Transparency in forum General Psychology
    Replies: 79
    Last Post: 05-12-2016, 07:00 PM
  2. Who sets the standards? Why is it so? Should it be different?
    By Survive & Stay Free in forum Politics, History, and Current Events
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 10-18-2011, 09:00 AM
  3. [NT] Why is it so hard for Me to stop focusing on Myself?
    By The Ü™ in forum The NT Rationale (ENTP, INTP, ENTJ, INTJ)
    Replies: 72
    Last Post: 07-15-2011, 06:06 AM
  4. Why is it so hard to not feed the trolls?
    By Zergling in forum The Bonfire
    Replies: 20
    Last Post: 11-15-2007, 05:23 AM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
Single Sign On provided by vBSSO