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  1. #31
    resonance entropie's Avatar
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    I have yesterday seen a serious documentation about the latest in fitness and health and there they presented the "short burst intense training method". This is actually one method I could imagine to excercise in the daily work life.

    It goes back on human evolution, where the hunters ran thru the field chasing an animal. In the moment of the hunt they had an intense burst of energy, to then later relax again or to have an equalized load. Intense training method says that you for 5 days a week should exercise about half an hour a day. For that you can for example use a home bicycle. Then you run on the bicycle for 4 minutes on full power and then you take it easy for 30 seconds. Then again 4 minutes full power and so on.

    If you havent done sports in a while like me, you should start easy on that. Then 30 minutes of easy bicycling should be it and that way you get more trained. If you havent done sports in a while, you shouldnt go running in the field aswell. The strain on the human joints and skeleton would be high so that sport injuries could happen. Rather start bicycling and then work your way up when you feel you are getting fitter.

    The documentation said that the greatest problem is our daily life. If you work an office job for example, you have a resting pulse allday long that equals to the pulse you'd have when you sleep. So the body never gets to power up and therefore he gets bad at the ability to burn fat. The consequences will be diabetes, which is a common illness for us nowadays.

    Another problem is if you work as a waitress for example and have lots of running to do in a day: there the problem is that you never get to sweat. Meaning you have a constant high load on your body but its not high enough to peak the pulse. So if you work as a waitress, one or two times you should do intense jogging in the week.

    Last but not least: fitness is encoded in the genes. The human body is an efficiency wonder, meaning it is better at taking on fat reserves than loosing them. Additionally some people are good fat burners but bad fat takers and others are good fat takers but bad burners. So to just say that fat people just eat too much or badly, is pretty stupid. As a matter of fact there are plenty fat people who could eat less than totally skinny people and still not loose weight.

    For the people who are good fat takers and bad burners there aint much to do but watch the food they eat: reduce direct fats and indirect fats (sugar, carbohydrates) and eat more vegetables.

    Besides all the superficial being skinny maniacism going on all this tips and hints here are still good, cause they are meant to improve your overall health. Health programs that aim to make you loose a lot of weight in only a few months, are not healthy and will never be. Loosing weigth will be a side-effect of living healthy.

    I have bought a home-bycicle and am going on it 30 minutes a day 5 days the week. Thats pretty good cause you can still watch TV on it.
    [URL]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tEBvftJUwDw&t=0s[/URL]

  2. #32
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    Quote Originally Posted by Venom View Post
    Bingo. It's all about hitting that breaking point where you actually have momentum! All the little shit doesn't matter. Would our body be so stupid as to gain/lose 10s of pounds in a year just by adding/subtracting a glass of orange juice? No. Our body prefers homeostasis and little changes like that are accounted for to keep us in stasis. The little s&&& just doesn't matter IMO. Your body is controlled by hormones and the food you eat and the way you live is shuffled around based on those hormones to keep you at homeostasis.

    It has to be BIG momentum to actaully change someone's hormone expression. If you sit around 23 hours a day outside of gym time your body still will express hormones like someone who sits around 23 hours a day! Humans were not meant to live sitting on their asses all day. Every new computer job means one more fat f&&& that humanity has to account for.

    That's the problem. It doesn't mean we have to be hiking or hunting all day. It doesn't mean we need 4, 6, 8 hours of "activity" either. We need jobs that have people not chained to desks and computers. Hell you can be inside. We need to get rid of the office clothes too. Those clothes are designed to be anti-movement. Suit jackets and button down are designed to make you immune to actual natural movement.

    I went from 160 to 200 from office jobs over a two year period. I remember that i easily dropped down to 180 within months of quitting for a more active job. Diet and "exercise as an activity in my planner" had nothing to do with it.
    Yeah it's really scary; sometimes when I look longingly at people's Mercedes-Benz, like my a couple of friends I have whose parents helped them buy one or something, I'm really sorry I wasn't from an upper middle class family; but the truth is I AM SUPER GLAD I AM FROM A SOUTHERN WORKING CLASS FAMILY. I HAD GREAT ROLE MODELS IN TERMS OF HUMAN MOVEMENT.

    My ISTJ grandfather was either constantly active or napping. On his days off he still gardened or worked in the yard. When he worked, he did physical labor. When I was growing up, I didn't know ANYONE who didn't at least stand up and walk around constantly when they went to work, if they didn't work even harder than that.

    And by virtue of being a Southerner, I knew working class people who owned large swaths of property (a complete oxymoron in urban areas, particularly outside of the South) ...so they grew a lot of their own food.

    My dad was a musician, he was probably the most "intellectual" person I knew, aside from my grandfather reading so much non-fiction and Westerns in his free time.

    Activity was something that everyone did. Everyone walked around and did stuff. I still have an issue where if I'm not in a nice, atmospheric restaurant, on a park bench, or at a meal with others, I will eat standing up. I will eat walking. I think it's WHY I love restaurants so much, it's like, sit down and just eat your food and enjoy the scenery.

    I walk everywhere. Walking is functional and cheap.

    I don't really know what it's like not to move, though. Anytime I've gotten depressed and moved less, I felt it in my body, I was so conscious of it.

    Doctors have basically stated that people who go to the gym who sit for 8-11 hours a day still have a great risk of things like heart disease.

    I could feel it when I was writing/editing for a living. At first I was like "hey cool" and after a while I was like "OMG I FUCKING HATE THIS, HOW DOES ANYONE DO THIS WITHOUT KILLING THEMSELVES."

    I couldn't sit still. I couldn't stay at a desk.

  3. #33
    pathwise dependent FDG's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Marmotini View Post
    Doctors have basically stated that people who go to the gym who sit for 8-11 hours a day still have a great risk of things like heart disease.
    It depends on what kind of exercise they primarly focus on, if they - for example - choose an approach similar to the one described by entropie, they'll likely manage to be fit (even in terms of health). If they just work on their chest, like most gym guys do, then no lol.
    ENTj 7-3-8 sx/sp

  4. #34
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    Quote Originally Posted by FDG View Post
    It depends on what kind of exercise they primarly focus on, if they - for example - choose an approach similar to the one described by entropie, they'll likely manage to be fit (even in terms of health). If they just work on their chest, like most gym guys do, then no lol.
    Nope.

    I read an article in L.A. Yoga that stated that it's really not enough to just go to the gym and get on the walking machine or what have you if your ass sits at a desk 10 hours a day, and advised that people constantly attempt to stand up or move around while working at a desk job, taking the stairs, etc.

    No, it's not just about type of exercise, it's sum total of time being sedentary versus being active.

  5. #35
    resonance entropie's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Marmotini View Post
    Yeah it's really scary; sometimes when I look longingly at people's Mercedes-Benz, like my a couple of friends I have whose parents helped them buy one or something, I'm really sorry I wasn't from an upper middle class family; but the truth is I AM SUPER GLAD I AM FROM A SOUTHERN WORKING CLASS FAMILY. I HAD GREAT ROLE MODELS IN TERMS OF HUMAN MOVEMENT.

    My ISTJ grandfather was either constantly active or napping. On his days off he still gardened or worked in the yard. When he worked, he did physical labor. When I was growing up, I didn't know ANYONE who didn't at least stand up and walk around constantly when they went to work, if they didn't work even harder than that.

    And by virtue of being a Southerner, I knew working class people who owned large swaths of property (a complete oxymoron in urban areas, particularly outside of the South) ...so they grew a lot of their own food.

    My dad was a musician, he was probably the most "intellectual" person I knew, aside from my grandfather reading so much non-fiction and Westerns in his free time.

    Activity was something that everyone did. Everyone walked around and did stuff. I still have an issue where if I'm not in a nice, atmospheric restaurant, on a park bench, or at a meal with others, I will eat standing up. I will eat walking. I think it's WHY I love restaurants so much, it's like, sit down and just eat your food and enjoy the scenery.

    I walk everywhere. Walking is functional and cheap.

    I don't really know what it's like not to move, though. Anytime I've gotten depressed and moved less, I felt it in my body, I was so conscious of it.

    Doctors have basically stated that people who go to the gym who sit for 8-11 hours a day still have a great risk of things like heart disease.

    I could feel it when I was writing/editing for a living. At first I was like "hey cool" and after a while I was like "OMG I FUCKING HATE THIS, HOW DOES ANYONE DO THIS WITHOUT KILLING THEMSELVES."

    I couldn't sit still. I couldn't stay at a desk.
    As a matter of fact in the documentary I watched, the one person who was retired but worked in the garden everyday for some hours, had the overall best health. And that tho he was age 68 and a bit overweight. (garden work would be it for germans, cause farmland is scarce )
    [URL]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tEBvftJUwDw&t=0s[/URL]

  6. #36
    FRACTALICIOUS phobik's Avatar
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    cuz they are ignorant lazy ass fux addicted to feel.good mentality.
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    Music provides one of the clearest examples of a much deeper relation between mathematics and human experience.

  7. #37
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    Quote Originally Posted by entropie View Post
    As a matter of fact in the documentary I watched, the one person who was retired but worked in the garden everyday for some hours, had the overall best health. And that tho he was age 68 and a bit overweight. (garden work would be it for germans, cause farmland is scarce )
    Yeah my mom said her aunt who lived to be 92 or 98 or something was a gardener who consistently walked.

    I feel pretty certain that unless I contract a rare terminal illness that I'm ONE OF THOSE PEOPLE because of my constant habitual walking (primarily due to not owning a car since I was 23), as well as actual hard aerobic exercise via jogging, aerobic videos, swimming, biking, dancing, and now vinyasa flow yoga.

    I am a habitual, steady mover who does spurts of higher activity.

    I think habitual, steady moving (like walking, gardening, being one of those people who do housework) is the answer, especially when combined with "real exercise" like periods of focused activity.

    I think being exposed to sun and fresh air is also important, as well as a varied diet, including fruits and vegetables, even if you eat some unhealthy greasy stuff.

    Other helpful health factors are sex and moderate alcohol consumption. MODERATE. Apparently people who drink moderate amounts of red wine, especially, have overall better health than non-drinkers or heavy drinkers. Better than non-drinkers is probably the surprising part: less strokes, less alzheimer's, less heart disease, less dementia.

    I'll probably do some kind of work that is varied or where I have to move for the rest of my life. I WILL NEVER EVER HAVE A 9 TO 5 CHAINED TO A DESK OFFICE JOB.

    I'm pretty sure I'd rather wait tables.

  8. #38
    pathwise dependent FDG's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Marmotini View Post
    Nope.

    I read an article in L.A. Yoga that stated that it's really not enough to just go to the gym and get on the walking machine or what have you if your ass sits at a desk 10 hours a day, and advised that people constantly attempt to stand up or move around while working at a desk job, taking the stairs, etc.

    No, it's not just about type of exercise, it's sum total of time being sedentary versus being active.
    It's definitely also related to the type of exercise, the study you mention was in fact focused on low-to-medium intensity exercise, which is ineffective for the reasons you state.
    ENTj 7-3-8 sx/sp

  9. #39
    reborn PeaceBaby's Avatar
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    Weight loss is a math equation - expressed somewhat differently for each person to account for their own unique physiology, but a math equation nonetheless.

    If you restrict caloric intake and are eating healthily - food in nature's form (not processed foods or excess meat and dairy) and being active, plus getting at least half an hour of brisk walking in a day to boot, you are going to lose weight. Period. Granted, I do think it's easier for some than others, but it's math, plain and simple.

    I've done my share of complaining about wanting to lose weight here and there too. It happens when I dedicate myself to it happening.

    Plus, there's no one on those weight loss shows who fail to lose, no one. I think it's difficult because people are hard-wired to want to eat high calorie foods from an evolutionary standpoint to ensure survival. Load up in times of plenty. That stuff just tastes better. And sadly, in our highly processed food environment atm, that stuff is just calorie-laden nutritionally deficient crap.
    "Remember always that you not only have the right to be an individual, you have an obligation to be one."
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    "When people see some things as beautiful,
    other things become ugly.
    When people see some things as good,
    other things become bad."
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  10. #40
    Iron Maiden fidelia's Avatar
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    I think you have to take into account the emotional role that food plays for some people - comfort, a method of dealing with anxiety, entertainment, a way of connecting with the people close to you, keeping people at a comfortable distance, avoiding attention of creepy people etc. I have had a couple of friends who have had lap band surgery, only to discovery that their weight issues were not physical, but emotional. That is much harder to deal with quickly and requires finding suitable replacements for the emotional hole food filled, as well as alternative ways of interacting with people. The older you are, the more difficult that is to do.

    I lived on a reserve for five years where the average person would drink several litres of pop a day, have fast food at least once a day, and where normal groceries are pizza pops, poutine, KD, lard, bannock, minute rice, wonderbread, spam and bologna. It is normal to be obese there, and so people's idea of overweight is redefined. I saw a lot of little children who even at 3 years old were walking with bowed legs on the sides of their feet because they were very obese. People who want to live a more healthy lifestyle aren't going to feel like they fit in with their family or friends, so it is hard to make different decisions over the long term. I remember an interview with Jennifer Hudson where she said that in her neighbourhood, there was no stigma for being a size 16 - it was an average size. So I think cultural (or subculture) norms play a role.

    In addition, your exposure earlier in life to physical exercise influences how much of a role you think it should play in your life. If you have never played sports or been inside a gym, it is much more intimidating to start without sufficient emotional support and a buddy to do it with. It is often difficult to coordinate schedules with someone else until you are at the point where exercise is a regular, every day part of life.

    Allergies also play a significant role in weight retention (particularly water, but also fat). If you have even a mild food allergy (most common with corn, soy, gluten, dairy, sugar), then the resulting inflammation can cause you to gain significant amounts of water weight. Think of how you get a water blister when you have a burn. It's the same idea, but in your internal tissues. I used to have ridiculous edema in my legs, hands, and vocal cords and gained 40 pounds in a very short amount of time. I was getting increasingly desperate as I saw the numbers on the scale shoot up, even as I ate better and exercised more than I ever had in my life. After discovering I was celiac (through a friend - I had been to about 10 doctors with no results and finally got tested for that at her suggestion) and going off gluten, I started losing weight with very little effort. I am still not at an ideal weight, but am also aware that I should be cutting out dairy entirely, as it is a problem for my guts too. Socially though, I find it difficult to be off both dairy and gluten on a long term basis.

    Anyway, weight loss isn't solely about calories in and out, even though I think in our culture that is a significant issue and the sheer availability and cheapness of non-nutritious food makes the struggle worse, especially when coupled with stressful lifestyle and not much time.

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