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  1. #11
    garbage
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    The girl and I are trying out some 10-Minute Trainer stuff, once to three times to day. For her, it's a supplement to teaching workout classes (she's insane); for me, it's about all I can do in one go before my terrible hip joint gives out.

    I'm also a fan of fitness bits for the same reason.

  2. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lark View Post
    I usually do sixteen or twenty minutes cross trainer at highest effort level I can, then I use the resistance weight machines (low row, shoulder press, lat machine, crunch machine, another one which exercises biceps I think) sometimes if I'm able I'll then do a further twenty minutes of cycling.
    This is all kind of vague, so I will just dive into what I have learned from my personal trainer.

    #1: Variety is key. Your body adapts to whatever you are doing and so you get diminishing returns.
    #2: For Cardio, going balls to the wall isn't necessarily the best policy. If you are trying to lose fat, then you want to do interval training based on your heartbeat. 45-60min. I was talking to @Halla74 about this stuff one time, and he told me about how it takes approximately 15 minutes for your body to burn through the sugar in your blood as a fuel source, and another 15 minutes to burn through some other thing. It's only after about 30 min that your body switches to fat.
    #3: You should be working on building muscle by doing strength based workouts. You should be changing up which machines/exercises that you do, even if you are working the same muscle groups. With strength training, it's about finding what weight allows you to do 12-15 reps with the last couple reps being at/near failure, rest for 45-60s, and then do another set of reps. My program right now consists of 15 minutes of moderate cardio, then 7 different strength exercises that I do 4 sets off with 15 reps and 60s of rest in between, then I do another 15 minutes of moderate cardio.
    #4: You should switch off from strength training every few months to work on muscle endurance. Less weight, more reps, faster pace.

    Above all this exercise, a healthy diet is almost more important. Cut out processed foods, any sugars, starchy foods, wheat, maybe even dairy. Focus on leafy greens, protein, healthy fats likes nuts and avocado. If you want to build muscle then you need to make sure you are ingesting enough protein. My trainer told me to aim for the ungodly amount of 175g a day since I am working on strength right now.

  3. #13
    Emperor/Dictator kyuuei's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Saturned View Post
    This is all kind of vague, so I will just dive into what I have learned from my personal trainer.

    #1: Variety is key. Your body adapts to whatever you are doing and so you get diminishing returns.
    #2: For Cardio, going balls to the wall isn't necessarily the best policy. If you are trying to lose fat, then you want to do interval training based on your heartbeat. 45-60min. I was talking to @Halla74 about this stuff one time, and he told me about how it takes approximately 15 minutes for your body to burn through the sugar in your blood as a fuel source, and another 15 minutes to burn through some other thing. It's only after about 30 min that your body switches to fat.
    #3: You should be working on building muscle by doing strength based workouts. You should be changing up which machines/exercises that you do, even if you are working the same muscle groups. With strength training, it's about finding what weight allows you to do 12-15 reps with the last couple reps being at/near failure, rest for 45-60s, and then do another set of reps. My program right now consists of 15 minutes of moderate cardio, then 7 different strength exercises that I do 4 sets off with 15 reps and 60s of rest in between, then I do another 15 minutes of moderate cardio.
    #4: You should switch off from strength training every few months to work on muscle endurance. Less weight, more reps, faster pace.

    Above all this exercise, a healthy diet is almost more important. Cut out processed foods, any sugars, starchy foods, wheat, maybe even dairy. Focus on leafy greens, protein, healthy fats likes nuts and avocado. If you want to build muscle then you need to make sure you are ingesting enough protein. My trainer told me to aim for the ungodly amount of 175g a day since I am working on strength right now.
    All key suggestions. Diet and exercise go together better than PB&J, you can work out like a beast but you won't have a six-pack without diet. (Many people have six-packs and don't realize it simply because seeing a six-pack has everything to do with cutting and not strength of the muscle alone.) Paleo-style diets (the suggestions above) are popular for cutting and weight loss because they're nutritious and contain everything you need and NOTHING extra. You need protein, and carbs, and fats... but the right ones.

    ..When it comes to that burn-for-30 thing, what people tend to forget is you burn calories with everything you do. You burn through around ~1,000kcal for a sedentary lifestyle--just walking around, doing light chores, cooking a bit.. a typical sedentary daily routine will use up about that much, give or take. If you're trying to burn calories, you need to burn more than you consume without consuming too little. People see that they burned 150 kcal on a machine and they feel forlorn that they did so 'little'. But if you're 130-140 lbs, you ought to be consuming at least x10 your weight to maintain that weight.. Anything less will hurt your body. Which means if you're eating 1,500 kcal, you're right on the money with 150 calories burned with a decent diet and healthy lifestyle... People diet and take away too much and then their metabolisms slow down trying to OVER exercise. So, if you work out in the morning, and use up that sugar... choosing a slightly less sedentary lifestyle throughout the day will burn fat just as easily. Just making some decisions like parking far away from the store, taking stairs, or taking a walk in the evenings are all ways to be less sedentary and burn a few calories slowly and efficiently throughout the day.

    People think they have to do hours in the gym.. but you really just need to split up the work outs. 30 minute intervals 1 or 2 times a day with a healthy diet and lifestyle is MORE than enough to get most people to the fitness goals they are looking for. An active person, I'd say at least an hour a day 1-2 times a day, but most people just want to lose some weight and be able to fit into their clothing with ease without having to think about fitness constantly.

    Variety is definitely key. Going swimming in the summers, taking trips to go hiking or to the beach to swim, or even just changing from walking to running or running to sprints. It doesn't have to be drastic changes.. For me, I simply switch work out DVDs.. I do dances, boot-camp styles, high-low intervals, switching from weights to floor work and body-weight, and aerobics. My body usually never tires of those five styles being rotated out.

    Building muscle... now.. that's an entire science all on its own. But, to get anyone started, moving between high weight and high reps is definitely helpful. You need both, because they effect different parts of the muscles. What most people think with high reps though is that they can do 10-20 without failing. I see people complete like 20 reps and they aren't even cussing out the spotter. This is not the case. High weight... you should have difficulty completing 6-8 (maaaybe 10 depending on the exercise) reps 1-3 times. High reps.. You should have difficulty completing 12-15 reps 2-5 times. Difficulty meaning you CAN complete it, or get really close to it, but that it required serious effort and finishing is an actual relief. If you can complete it without feeling completely challenged the weight is too light, on either circuit.

    Awesome points, girl!
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  4. #14
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    When I'm at home, I like to jump rope, do squats, leg lifts, push-ups, sit-ups, jumping jacks, arm lifts, free weights and clean the house!

    Just add music!

  5. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by kyuuei View Post
    ...
    I really liked your post and I want to add some more in-depth details to what you're saying.

    Before we get into boosted levels of calorie burning, let's look at base metabolic rate, or BMR. You can calculate this number here:

    http://health.discovery.com/tools/ca...sal/basal.html

    After you find your BMR, a lot of times they will want you to calculate your actual calories burned across the MET scale. Instead of doing that, though, I prefer to use the sedentary rate and then use more specific, accurate calories burned (provided by your exercise equipment or online calculators) to add on to each day and find your actual calories burned.

    Typical METS value for a sedentary lifestyle is 1.2, but I find 1.1 to be more accurate. So I'll do myself... in the calculator my BMR is right about 2,000. Add 10% for the sedentary rate, and I use up 2,200 calories doing just about nothing.

    Now let's say I jump on the elliptical, punch in my weight, go for an hour and it ends up giving me 900 calories burned. I add that on to 2,200 for a total daily burn of 3,100. Let's say I ride a bike for 30 minutes at 12-15 mph... I can google any number of online calculators to find out how many calories that burned. For the average active person, this will give you more accurate numbers than the METS values... if you're super active though, the continual caloric burn can't be found this way, so METS values are better and those values can be found online as well.

    If you can afford it, let me suggest the BodyMedia FIT CORE armband... it will give you an even more accurate number (calculated from your body heat and sweat to within +/-10% of actual calories burned) and also provides nutrition and sleep logs/analysis.



    There are 2 types of calories burned... directly from exercising and calories burned indirectly throughout the day, and so 2 ways to attack your fitness regimine.

    If you want to burn calories directly, you will need more than 30 minutes a day. The body doesn't actively start burning energy from fat sources for about 20 minutes into low-intensity exercising. To most effectively do this, 60 minutes of low intensity cardio (eliptical is pretty much your only viable choice) first thing in the morning before you eat anything is your best option. If you're really OCD and think you can succeed at your goals by counting calories and basically being a nit-picker, then this method will work for you.

    Personally, I prefer to take a more holistic approach to things, and that means shorter, high-intensity sessions as well as strength training. I do P90X2 in the mornings (only Monday to Friday, I skip yoga) and low-intensity cardio+calistenics in the after-work hours to boost my metabolism through the rest of the evening after the post-lunch lull. The high intensity workout gives you a slow all-day burn, and the muscle building will help you increase your overall calories burned.



    Something I will say, though, is if you choose the more hollistic form of exercise schedule, you will need to take up a more nit-picky diet... since you're banking calories burned on your metabolism through the day, you've got to watch out for high GI foods right after workout which can work against you. Also, you'll probably want to adopt a diet of more smaller meals to contribute to the metabolism focus of your diet and exercise plan. The direct calories burned method of exercising will burn calories as you work out, so afterwards how you eat won't make as much a difference (it still helps, though, and there is still a small afterburn)

  6. #16
    Supreme High Commander Andy's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lark View Post
    I'm going to the gym lots at the moment but its not enough and I was wondering about "days off" or exercises or home equipment to supplement the gym, what do you own? What do you think is essential? So far I figure a jump rope and beyond that press ups, sit ups and squats are pretty much it.
    If you want to fo additional exercises to your gym work, make sure they are as different to your gym work as possible. I used to mix weight lifting and fencing without over training because the way the two stressed the body was so very different.
    Don't make whine out of sour grapes.

  7. #17
    Artisan Conquerer Halla74's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Saturned View Post
    This is all kind of vague, so I will just dive into what I have learned from my personal trainer.
    Go for it!

    Quote Originally Posted by Saturned View Post
    #1: Variety is key. Your body adapts to whatever you are doing and so you get diminishing returns.
    Yes. I'll add a bit more though for the sake of being thorough.

    (a) It's very important to train your WHOLE BODY, and not just "spot train" what you wish to improve. Spot training DOESN'T WORK.

    (b) The easiest way for me to train my whole body is to break up my major/minor muscle groups in a logical order. A solid four-day (not necessarily consecutive days) routine to train the whole body is:
    - DAY #1: Chest + Triceps + Abs
    - DAY #2: Back/Traps + Calves
    - DAY #3: Shoulders, Biceps, Forearms + Abs
    - DAY #4: Legs (Quadriceps, Hamstrings, , Tibalis Anterior + Calves (Soleus and Gastrochnemius)
    NOTE: I do 30 minutes of cardio (interval training on 1 to 3 different machines, for variety)

    (c) So far as training intensity goes, if you train each set to failure (inability to do one more rep) then you hit the right spot. The trick is how much weight to use for power, strength/size balance, and endurance?
    - POWER: (1 to 3 reps per set)
    - STRENGTH/SIZE BALANCE: (4 to 7 reps per set)
    - ENDURANCE: (8 to 15 reps per set)

    (d) Finally, to challenge yourself further, do Super-Sets (Two exercises of the same muscle group performed back to back, 3 sets then quickly becomes 6 sets) - OR - Giant-Sets (Three exercises of the same muscle group performed back to back, 3 sets then quickly becomes 9 sets)

    Quote Originally Posted by Saturned View Post
    ##2: For Cardio, going balls to the wall isn't necessarily the best policy. If you are trying to lose fat, then you want to do interval training based on your heartbeat. 45-60min. I was talking to @Halla74 about this stuff one time, and he told me about how it takes approximately 15 minutes for your body to burn through the sugar in your blood as a fuel source, and another 15 minutes to burn through fatty acids in your blood. It's only after about 30 min that your body switches to fat.
    Fixed!

    Quote Originally Posted by Saturned View Post
    ##3: You should be working on building muscle by doing strength based workouts. You should be changing up which machines/exercises that you do, even if you are working the same muscle groups. With strength training, it's about finding what weight allows you to do 12-15 reps with the last couple reps being at/near failure, rest for 45-60s, and then do another set of reps. My program right now consists of 15 minutes of moderate cardio, then 7 different strength exercises that I do 4 sets off with 15 reps and 60s of rest in between, then I do another 15 minutes of moderate cardio.
    Awesome! This is great, keep it up!

    Quote Originally Posted by Saturned View Post
    ##4: You should switch off from strength training every few months to work on muscle endurance. Less weight, more reps, faster pace.
    Yes, this is very important. Without doing this even the most rigorous and dedicated athletes will hit a plateau and stop making gains.

    Quote Originally Posted by Saturned View Post
    #Above all this exercise, a healthy diet is almost more important. Cut out processed foods, any sugars, starchy foods, wheat, maybe even dairy. Focus on leafy greens, protein, healthy fats likes nuts and avocado. If you want to build muscle then you need to make sure you are ingesting enough protein. My trainer told me to aim for the ungodly amount of 175g a day since I am working on strength right now.
    All 100% correct.
    Without a healthy, balanced diet of whole, fresh foods, there is only so far you can go in the quest of being "Super Fit."
    Cardio is very important, resistance training is very important = but nutrition trumps BOTH of them in importance.

    Cheers!



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  8. #18

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    I did the Halla workout and it half killed me.

    Although what exercise do you do besides the gym Halla, do you have free weights or anything at home for the non-gym days?

  9. #19
    Senior Member pinkgraffiti's Avatar
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    Yeah, I agree. I recommend you get yourself one of those "Polar" cardiometers, they can help you create your perfect personalised workout.

    Quote Originally Posted by Saturned View Post
    What do you do at the gym? One doesn't necessarily need to exercise longer, merely smarter.

  10. #20
    Blah Orangey's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by pinkgraffiti View Post
    Yeah, I agree. I recommend you get yourself one of those "Polar" cardiometers, they can help you create your perfect personalised workout.
    Yeah, I have a fairly cheap shit FT4, and it really takes away a lot of the guesswork. It really helps to keep one's intensity up, and if you're counting calories it's more accurate than the internet estimators.
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