User Tag List

First 12

Results 11 to 16 of 16

  1. #11
    Senior Member Mal12345's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    MBTI
    IxTP
    Enneagram
    5w4 sx/sp
    Socionics
    LII Ti
    Posts
    13,991

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by sprinkles View Post
    Might be over work/having too many patients as well. Where I live you typically don't even see a doctor - they only have time to walk in and say hello pretty much, if you're lucky, some times not even that. The practitioners and techs do all the actual work and examining while the doctor just kind of buzzes around from room to room all day every day almost non stop. They simply don't even have enough time in a day to see everyone that comes into the office.
    They're busy getting done fast so they can hit the golf course early. The last guy I saw was a PA and he actually did an exam, amazingly. I predict that in the upcoming years American healthcare will go the way of every effort to socialize healthcare, and take a nosedive in quality. Please God, I don't want British teeth.
    "Everyone has a plan till they get punched in the mouth." Mike Tyson
    “Culture?” says Paul McCartney. “This isn't culture. It's just a good laugh.”

  2. #12
    Emperor/Dictator kyuuei's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    MBTI
    enfp
    Enneagram
    8
    Posts
    13,878

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Mal+ View Post
    But when I go in with a strange rash on my arm, and you stand at your computer for 14 out of 15 minutes not even looking in my direction, what's the point of me coming in?

    Isn't "rash" one of the known symptoms of fibromyalgia?
    Or a slew of other things. Literally anything and everything causes a rash.. Coming and going at will sounds more like eczema than something curable. Eczema hasn't a cure at all -- you can take auto-immune suppressants, which cause more problems than the rash itself.

    My mother had a 'rash' that turned out to not be a rash at all--it was a rare muscle condition and her muscles were literally bleeding, the blood surfacing to the skin irritated it and caused itching and pain. If we had not found a doctor who's dealt with that particular disease before my mom could have died from the misdiagnosis. A rash is caused by too many things. You can't really come in with a rash, no real explanation, and expect a diagnosis. It just isn't going to happen, whether you had a competent doctor or not.

    In this case, I'd say you didn't. Most general practioners aren't there to help you fix a problem outside of "I need medicine for this identifiable illness." They're gateways to specialists.. they steer you in, hopefully, the right direction. Jack of all trades, master of none. Good general practioners and family doctors have a lot of experience in several fields, but some just learn enough to help the masses and try their best for the cases that fall in their lap.

    And how about this other doctor who hand-waved away my complaint about neck strain by saying, "Everybody gets that." Really? Everybody has chronic neck pain? Everybody has a pain that never completely goes away and requires daily stretching to relieve some of the pain? Wow. I must live on a different planet or something, because very few here seem to have that issue. Just one other guy I knew years ago who wore a neck brace. His neck surgery, of course, had just made matters worse.
    Lots of people actually do deal with chronic pains. I don't think I agree with the doctor waving it off and not sending you further down the chain, but in that case simply get a new doctor, or research a specialist yourself and explain the situation to your insurance. (if you live in a socialist country, just go anywhere else, even easier.) I don't think civilians mention it as much, but the number of people who have carpal tunnel vs the people seeking to fix it is astounding. Back pains are more common than neck pains, but this is the age of computers and technology.. those things are very common symptoms of the general public.

    It is really easy to get cynical about doctors after running into some bad ones.. I know, trust me. But you don't hate teachers just because you had a bad one, right? You know there's good ones that care and love their job out there.. so it's easy to think that you can just keep probing until you find a good one.
    Kantgirl: Just say "I'm feminine and I'll punch anyone who says otherwise!"
    Halla74: Think your way through the world. Feel your way through life.

    Cimarron: maybe Prpl will be your girl-bud
    prplchknz: i don't like it

    In Search Of... ... Kiwi Sketch Art ... Dream Journal ... Kyuuei's Cook book ... Kyu's Tiny House Blog ... Minimalist Challenge ... Kyu's Savings Challenge

  3. #13
    Senior Member Mal12345's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    MBTI
    IxTP
    Enneagram
    5w4 sx/sp
    Socionics
    LII Ti
    Posts
    13,991

    Default

    I like doctors, as a profession. But something has definitely changed from when I was a child.

    I told a PT guy about my neck and he unhesitatingly went through a complete diagnostic. (Without doing an MRI however, it's more questionable that way.) But then he is a specialist, rattling off names of tiny muscles and identifying my areas of muscle stress. You're right in that the GP should have given me a referral to a dermatologist. Anything, but don't simply stand there at the monitor clicking away at the keyboard with your back turned.

    One of my basic psychological issues is knowing what my needs are and then getting them met. Is that related to type?
    "Everyone has a plan till they get punched in the mouth." Mike Tyson
    “Culture?” says Paul McCartney. “This isn't culture. It's just a good laugh.”

  4. #14
    ..... Intricate Mystic's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    MBTI
    INFJ
    Enneagram
    4w5
    Posts
    599

    Default

    I probably should have put the word Google in quotes. I was using it as a metaphor for the Dr having to look up info online (from whatever source they use) instead of knowing the answer. I'm familiar with doctors spending a lot of time in the visit with you typing on the computer. They also do this at top-notch places like the Mayo Clinic. The difference between those Drs and the one you saw is that they actually spend time examining their patients, talking to them, listening to them, and have an institutional focus/culture of putting the patient first. In reading your other posts, it sounds like there's something a little complicated going on with your health that a GP may not have the skills to diagnose. Is there a teaching hospital or clinic with a top-notch reputation anywhere near you that you could visit?


    Quote Originally Posted by Mal+ View Post
    He didn't Google it, he got the diagnosis from something I blathered about folliculitis.

    Here's the part I didn't think I had to explain:

    I don't know about the rest of the world, but around here doctors are using either wall mounted monitors linked to a central computer, or a wireless laptop linked to a central computer, as a replacement for their old-fashioned clipboards. Every bit of my medical information has been digitalized. In this particular clinic, the doctor spends 99% of his time facing the computer monitor on the wall typing in information. That doesn't mean all doctors are like that. But 3 people I know, including myself, were examined by this doctor and he didn't even do a routine cardiovascular check-up or test reflexes. When it came to examining my arm, all he did was stare at it.

  5. #15
    Senior Member Mal12345's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    MBTI
    IxTP
    Enneagram
    5w4 sx/sp
    Socionics
    LII Ti
    Posts
    13,991

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Intricate Mystic View Post
    I probably should have put the word Google in quotes. I was using it as a metaphor for the Dr having to look up info online (from whatever source they use) instead of knowing the answer. I'm familiar with doctors spending a lot of time in the visit with you typing on the computer. They also do this at top-notch places like the Mayo Clinic. The difference between those Drs and the one you saw is that they actually spend time examining their patients, talking to them, listening to them, and have an institutional focus/culture of putting the patient first. In reading your other posts, it sounds like there's something a little complicated going on with your health that a GP may not have the skills to diagnose. Is there a teaching hospital or clinic with a top-notch reputation anywhere near you that you could visit?
    It doesn't look like they have internet access from the examination rooms. After he looked at my arm for a while I said something about folliculitis, and that's apparently what he typed in because he said "folliculitis without pus" when he turned back to the keyboard.

    I also think I should have gone back the next week when the antibiotics failed. The blister-like things were there for two more weeks. This could get expensive.

    I only know the reputations of the bad clinics. They're bad. Why does the front desk lady have to state out loud, so that everyone in the waiting room can hear it, something personal and medical that I wrote on the paper I filled out while waiting? And why did the front desk girl at the other clinic hold on to my debit card until my visit was through? Do I look like someone who might sneak out without paying?

    What's up with doctors AND clinics these days?
    "Everyone has a plan till they get punched in the mouth." Mike Tyson
    “Culture?” says Paul McCartney. “This isn't culture. It's just a good laugh.”

  6. #16

    Default

    Well, it took months and months before I got properly diagnosed with rheumatoid arthritis. And by then I could barely get up to go to the doctor so it didn't take a real stretch of the imagination to realize something was wrong with me.

    It started out as an awful, chronic pain in my foot that I just got painkillers for. And when the swelling started they said it was allergies so I got prescribed an anti-allergen for it. None of those things helped. I progressed. Eventually it was like "OHHH we should give her some arthritis blood tests!"

    So I can empathize about how frustrating doctors can be, but to be fair to them, before my symptoms were more pronounced they were pretty generic. Foot pain and swelling could have been anything.

    And I'm not saying what you're experiencing is or isn't anything, but you gotta be patient. Yes, doctors should be more attentive and understanding, but they also see a lot of generic symptoms every day. And probably only 1% of those are BIG problems. Statistically, their best bet is to just give you something to treat the immediate symptoms, hope that works and address any additional symptoms that might arise after the fact later on.

Similar Threads

  1. What's up with the prevalence of "bitch tits"?
    By juggernaut in forum Health and Fitness
    Replies: 78
    Last Post: 05-28-2009, 10:20 AM
  2. What's Up With Whimsical Street Names?
    By Shaula in forum The Bonfire
    Replies: 17
    Last Post: 04-16-2009, 01:47 PM
  3. What's up with google?
    By wolfy in forum Science, Technology, and Future Tech
    Replies: 10
    Last Post: 01-31-2009, 05:41 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
Single Sign On provided by vBSSO