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  1. #1
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    Default Vegetarian Athletes

    Is anybody one?

    I played sports in college and I guess my body was more resilient then. I still want to be vegetarian now, but I need to be more conscious. I am 28 and have been generally meat-free for almost 14 years. I think I over-did it this past week or so, either too much exercise or not enough food or not enough of the right kind of food (maybe not enough sleep too). So I have been taking it a bit easier in terms of exercise until my energy returns. Today is a bit better!

    Eat lots of eggs, cheese, beans/legumes, whole grains, fresh produce, some protein supplement like boca burger or whey protein in smoothies. Things I try to pay attention to:
    • Protein
    • Iron
    • B-12


    It doesn't seem like there is a lot of overlap. My vegetarian/vegan friends tend to be pretty scrawny, not into sports beside maybe riding bicycles or yoga. My athlete friends love to eat steak and things like that.
    Your kisses, sweeter than honey. But guess what, so is my money.

  2. #2

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    I'm not vegetarian, the only vegetarian lifter I know is Bill Pearl. Pretty famous bodybuilder.

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    Senior Member Bamboo's Avatar
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    Are you intentionally making complete proteins from incomplete proteins?

    perhaps you are already aware, but not all 'protein' is the same. plants do contain proteins (amino acids) but they tend to be "incomplete." meat, eggs, and some others (dairy is questionable) are (for the most part) "complete" protein sources. with veggies nuts grain etc., you have to combine multiple protein sources in the right amounts, or else some remains incomplete and just gets wasted, though of course you'll still get other nutrient value (ie. vitamins etc) for your body to make use of.


    it's a little misleading to read a jar a peanut butter and see x% protein. those amino acids have to be combined with something else for them to be useful for your body.

    look it up, it's not really that complicated but it does mean that unless you are specific about what and how many incompletes you eat (what combos you form) you won't be as efficient in forming complete proteins as someone who just eats the complete stuff from the start.

    (remember in chemistry class how you had x grams of two elements and you had to calculate how much product they would form? unless you had the perfect ratios of elements, in the end you'd form a product but you'd also have elements which didn't get used in the reaction and would just be left over. it's like that.)

    however in practice you can get a lot of protein from some filling meals, so even with lower efficiency someone eating incompletes and who just a little aware of needing variety can do alright and get enough.
    Don't know how much it'll bend til it breaks.

  4. #4
    Senior Member Scott N Denver's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by gromit View Post
    Is anybody one?

    I played sports in college and I guess my body was more resilient then. I still want to be vegetarian now, but I need to be more conscious. I am 28 and have been generally meat-free for almost 14 years. I think I over-did it this past week or so, either too much exercise or not enough food or not enough of the right kind of food (maybe not enough sleep too). So I have been taking it a bit easier in terms of exercise until my energy returns. Today is a bit better!

    Eat lots of eggs, cheese, beans/legumes, whole grains, fresh produce, some protein supplement like boca burger or whey protein in smoothies. Things I try to pay attention to:
    • Protein
    • Iron
    • B-12


    It doesn't seem like there is a lot of overlap. My vegetarian/vegan friends tend to be pretty scrawny, not into sports beside maybe riding bicycles or yoga. My athlete friends love to eat steak and things like that.
    Depending on what you consider an "athlete" then I am one. I've been vegetarian for like 14 years or so, lactovegetarian mostly. For a while I ate fish like once every 6-24 months but the last tie I ate fish is when I came back from Japan. I will eat eggs, but usually if they are in something someone cooked.

    I've practiced yoga for like 14 years or so as well, and done martial arts for longer. Aerobic martial arts like tae kwon do, self defense-oriented how to break people's body parts martial arts like jujitsu, but now I focus more on soft/internal martial arts primarily baguazhang and tai chi chuan though also some xingyi. I have always been broad shouldered and thick boned and stocky. Sometimes I've had more fat as well. I've done a lot of hiking in the past, and quite a bit of backpacking further back in the day. I try to go jogging on a regular basis, but have never been a distance jogger. I would rather sling someone over my shoulder and walk up multiple flights of stairs than go distance jogging.

    I'm sorta not sure what to say about food because my diet living at high elevation in intense sunlight and heat is rather different by necessity then when I lived at low elevation in places that actually had moisture. Here I can drink 2 quarts of water and a quart of gatorade and still dehydrate and feel like I'm melting. With that said here I eat/drink: lettuce, yogurt, grape juice, carbs, frozen fruit, lots of water. Wherever I've lived I've always been big into cereal, vegetables, spaghetti ro some other carbs, and a fan of soy veggie burgers. Boca and Morningstar are my two favorite brands. I eat lots of vegetables. Carb intake is the thing I have the most swings in, sometimes its alot, others days not much.

    A friend who went ot the Air Force Academy commented to me in one of my more-fat life periods that every vegetarian he knew who was overweight it was from bread, or at least carbs. My relationship with carbs has never been the same since then.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Scott N Denver View Post
    Depending on what you consider an "athlete" then I am one. I've been vegetarian for like 14 years or so, lactovegetarian mostly. For a while I ate fish like once every 6-24 months but the last tie I ate fish is when I came back from Japan. I will eat eggs, but usually if they are in something someone cooked.

    I've practiced yoga for like 14 years or so as well, and done martial arts for longer. Aerobic martial arts like tae kwon do, self defense-oriented how to break people's body parts martial arts like jujitsu, but now I focus more on soft/internal martial arts primarily baguazhang and tai chi chuan though also some xingyi. I have always been broad shouldered and thick boned and stocky. Sometimes I've had more fat as well. I've done a lot of hiking in the past, and quite a bit of backpacking further back in the day. I try to go jogging on a regular basis, but have never been a distance jogger. I would rather sling someone over my shoulder and walk up multiple flights of stairs than go distance jogging.

    I'm sorta not sure what to say about food because my diet living at high elevation in intense sunlight and heat is rather different by necessity then when I lived at low elevation in places that actually had moisture. Here I can drink 2 quarts of water and a quart of gatorade and still dehydrate and feel like I'm melting. With that said here I eat/drink: lettuce, yogurt, grape juice, carbs, frozen fruit, lots of water. Wherever I've lived I've always been big into cereal, vegetables, spaghetti ro some other carbs, and a fan of soy veggie burgers. Boca and Morningstar are my two favorite brands. I eat lots of vegetables. Carb intake is the thing I have the most swings in, sometimes its alot, others days not much.

    A friend who went ot the Air Force Academy commented to me in one of my more-fat life periods that every vegetarian he knew who was overweight it was from bread, or at least carbs. My relationship with carbs has never been the same since then.
    I am lacto-ovo too I guess (eat dairy and eggs right?)

    I guess I would define athlete as at least 5-10 hours of cardio and/or strength exercise per week. I'm with you on the simple carbs. Not something I eat a lot of. I just feel sluggy and not as great.
    Your kisses, sweeter than honey. But guess what, so is my money.

  6. #6
    Senior Member Scott N Denver's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by gromit View Post
    I am lacto-ovo too I guess (eat dairy and eggs right?)

    I guess I would define athlete as at least 5-10 hours of cardio and/or strength exercise per week. I'm with you on the simple carbs. Not something I eat a lot of. I just feel sluggy and not as great.
    I used to tell people I was "basically lacto-ovo", but then I think I got sick of saying it and I dont think people were that interested so I just started saying "I still eat dairy like milk and cheese and yogurt, and occasionally I might eat some egg but usually only if someone cooks with it." Which is basically lacto or lacto-ovo but without the big sounding words that people didnt seem to care about.

    When I feel down food-energy wise it usually means I've gone too long between meals, or that I need to drink more water and/or gatorade. I didnt need nearly so much gatorade when I lived elsewhere.

    I often snack on crackers and peanut butter. When its really hot and dry and I'm sick of drinking water I'll crave small amounts of chocolate candy. Didnt have that when I lived elsewhere.

    I do a lot of breathing practices, both yogic and Taoist, and often if i feel sluggish overall such practices make me feel better. Other times I just need more fluids and/or calories.

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    Yeah I think it was calories. I got chinese after the hike Saturday and ate an entire giant plate of bean curd vegetables. Mmmm...
    Your kisses, sweeter than honey. But guess what, so is my money.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Bamboo View Post
    Are you intentionally making complete proteins from incomplete proteins?

    perhaps you are already aware, but not all 'protein' is the same. plants do contain proteins (amino acids) but they tend to be "incomplete." meat, eggs, and some others (dairy is questionable) are (for the most part) "complete" protein sources. with veggies nuts grain etc., you have to combine multiple protein sources in the right amounts, or else some remains incomplete and just gets wasted, though of course you'll still get other nutrient value (ie. vitamins etc) for your body to make use of.


    it's a little misleading to read a jar a peanut butter and see x% protein. those amino acids have to be combined with something else for them to be useful for your body.

    look it up, it's not really that complicated but it does mean that unless you are specific about what and how many incompletes you eat (what combos you form) you won't be as efficient in forming complete proteins as someone who just eats the complete stuff from the start.

    (remember in chemistry class how you had x grams of two elements and you had to calculate how much product they would form? unless you had the perfect ratios of elements, in the end you'd form a product but you'd also have elements which didn't get used in the reaction and would just be left over. it's like that.)

    however in practice you can get a lot of protein from some filling meals, so even with lower efficiency someone eating incompletes and who just a little aware of needing variety can do alright and get enough.
    Oh yeah I missed this post somehow.

    I have read up on that, and the little triangle thing (you're supposed to consume foods from at least two of the three points of the triangle). I tend to do that anyway. Beans and rice. Nuts and cheese. Soy veggie burger and whole grain bun. But then apparently animal protein is complete, like eggs. So I figure if I have that at least once per day that's probably pretty good.
    Your kisses, sweeter than honey. But guess what, so is my money.

  9. #9
    Senior Member Wolfie's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bamboo View Post
    Are you intentionally making complete proteins from incomplete proteins?

    perhaps you are already aware, but not all 'protein' is the same. plants do contain proteins (amino acids) but they tend to be "incomplete." meat, eggs, and some others (dairy is questionable) are (for the most part) "complete" protein sources. with veggies nuts grain etc., you have to combine multiple protein sources in the right amounts, or else some remains incomplete and just gets wasted, though of course you'll still get other nutrient value (ie. vitamins etc) for your body to make use of.


    it's a little misleading to read a jar a peanut butter and see x% protein. those amino acids have to be combined with something else for them to be useful for your body.

    look it up, it's not really that complicated but it does mean that unless you are specific about what and how many incompletes you eat (what combos you form) you won't be as efficient in forming complete proteins as someone who just eats the complete stuff from the start.

    (remember in chemistry class how you had x grams of two elements and you had to calculate how much product they would form? unless you had the perfect ratios of elements, in the end you'd form a product but you'd also have elements which didn't get used in the reaction and would just be left over. it's like that.)

    however in practice you can get a lot of protein from some filling meals, so even with lower efficiency someone eating incompletes and who just a little aware of needing variety can do alright and get enough.
    Myth!

    I have been a lifelong vegetarian (never eaten meat) and I have never been malnourished. My mom is a nutritionist.

    Here's an article:

    http://www.diseaseproof.com/archives...t-go-away.html

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by Wolfie View Post
    Myth!

    I have been a lifelong vegetarian (never eaten meat) and I have never been malnourished. My mom is a nutritionist.

    Here's an article:

    http://www.diseaseproof.com/archives...t-go-away.html
    Weird. I have definitely read it in nutrition books. Ah well I still try to eat a variety of foods anyway (and eggs once per day). Can't hurt!
    Your kisses, sweeter than honey. But guess what, so is my money.

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