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  1. #51
    Senior Member Tiltyred's Avatar
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    I really think she is just communicating her strong interest in the food, not that she wants to scratch cabinets. If she only does it when you're making food, she's just trying to make sure you know she wants some. So another thing your mother could try is putting a treat down for her before she starts working at the counter. If she's busy eating, she won't be so frantic about someone making food.

  2. #52
    Temporal Mechanic. Lexicon's Avatar
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    Default Forcefeeding pills to injured pet (tips?)

    @Amargith- (or anyone good with this topic) your citizens need you once again!

    *plugs in the cord*




    I know you're not a big blog reader, but I wrote recently in mine how Jack had another surgery yesterday. Picking him up this afternoon.

    Anyway, posting my general question in here, since any advice on this topic may be of use to others at some point.

    They'll be giving me some pain meds & antibiotics to give him. Likely pills. Last time, when he needed the antibiotics, I'd used these pill pocket treats, which worked til the last 2 doses (he caught on/refused to eat them, little shit). So I had to do the oldfashioned forcefeed (the only effective way I've gotten is to go up behind him [almost mounting] so he can't back away or move in too many directions] & force his mouth open with my fingers, tossing the pill as far back in the throat as I can, holding his mouth shut & keeping his head tilted back, feeling his throat for swallowing movements).

    I'm probably overthinking, but if you have any tips for doing this in a less abrasive manner, it'd be helpful. My main concern is the sutured area in his upper rear leg. I don't want it irritated by struggling if it's avoidable.

    Thanks<3
    03/23 06:06:58 EcK: lex
    03/23 06:06:59 EcK: lex
    03/23 06:21:34 Nancynobullets: LEXXX *sacrifices a first born*
    03/23 06:21:53 Nancynobullets: We summon yooouuu
    03/23 06:29:07 Lexicon: I was sleeping!



    04/25 04:20:35 Patches: Don't listen to lex. She wants to birth a litter of kittens. She doesnt get to decide whats creepy

    02/16 23:49:38 ygolo: Lex is afk
    02/16 23:49:45 Cimarron: she's doing drugs with Jack

    03/05 19:27:41 Time: You can't make chat morbid. Lex does it naturally.

  3. #53
    The High Priestess Amargith's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lexicon View Post
    @Amargith- (or anyone good with this topic) your citizens need you once again!

    *plugs in the cord*




    I know you're not a big blog reader, but I wrote recently in mine how Jack had another surgery yesterday. Picking him up this afternoon.

    Anyway, posting my general question in here, since any advice on this topic may be of use to others at some point.

    They'll be giving me some pain meds & antibiotics to give him. Likely pills. Last time, when he needed the antibiotics, I'd used these pill pocket treats, which worked til the last 2 doses (he caught on/refused to eat them, little shit). So I had to do the oldfashioned forcefeed (the only effective way I've gotten is to go up behind him [almost mounting] so he can't back away or move in too many directions] & force his mouth open with my fingers, tossing the pill as far back in the throat as I can, holding his mouth shut & keeping his head tilted back, feeling his throat for swallowing movements).

    I'm probably overthinking, but if you have any tips for doing this in a less abrasive manner, it'd be helpful. My main concern is the sutured area in his upper rear leg. I don't want it irritated by struggling if it's avoidable.

    Thanks<3
    Hey sweety, long time no see


    Ok, so feeding pills to obstinate cats. Here we go:

    2 of mine get/got (Prin) their pills pulverised in some wet food. They are in such a hurry to eat it as they never get this, that they don't notice that there is fine powder mixed in with the jelly

    2 of mine are too finicky for that treatment, and there I pulverise the pills into powder (they have little toys for this, or just use two spoons), then add the tiniest bit of warm water, dissolve it and pull it up into a syringe. That then gets emptied in the back of their throat so that swallowing isn't optional.

    And since two of mine both refuse the food AND drool out the water mixture (yes, I kid you not), I also use the forceful treatment aka, I grab em, put em with their ass against my stomach, lift their chin, open that mouth, chuck it in the back of their throats and hold the mouth closed till they swallow. Allow for a tiny bit of space so they can stick out their tongue and use it to swallow as well as use their nose to breath. Basically, put your fingers as a ring around the mouth. And expect them to get better at tricking you into thinking that they swallowed, so check before you release em.

    In all of this, except the first method, it is a good thing to start with a small piece of candy and end with a piece of candy to at least somewhat mitigate the negative association you're going to create with the force you'll be using, so you can keep treating them instead of making them completely paranoid and avoidant.

    To facilitate the last method, they also sell what we call 'pill shooters' which is basically a clamp to put the pill right down his throat.


    Or, ya know, you could request your doctor make the medication a syrup - preferably one that most cats like. Mine just had dental surgery and the vet automatically just went for syrups. The two that had the surgery ended up just lapping up the medication like it was candy.

    Oh and lastly - my eating machine of a tom cat at some point needed antibiotics. I was all ready to go force feeding pill down his throat on him - as he is the one that drools out shit - when I accidentally dropped it in front of him. He scarfed it down before I could even grab it. Made my life a whole hell of a lot easier

    So see if he wants some candy. If not, go to plan B


    From what Ive read, you're making great headway in the treatment and things are cautiously optimistic. I'll be keeping my fingers crossed for you two!
    ★ڿڰۣ✿ℒoѵℯ✿ڿڰۣ★





    "Harm none, do as ye will”

  4. #54
    Vulnerability Eilonwy's Avatar
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    Is Jack any better with liquids? If he is, you can ask if the meds come in liquid form. Unfortunately, I found liquids almost as difficult as pills once my cats caught on to what I was doing, but at least I could get them down them quickly. Watch out for the ones that make them foam at the mouth, though. I stayed away from those liquids when I could because most of it seemed to foam out onto my carpet and walls and wherever else my cat could fling it. Also, I've had good luck with transdermal pain meds. Just rub them in the ear. You might want to discuss the transdermal with your vet, though. The most recent data is saying that some transdermal meds aren't as effective. Pain meds, however, seem to do well in transdermal form.

    Hope this was of some help.
    Johari / Nohari

    “That we are capable only of being what we are remains our unforgivable sin.” ― Gene Wolfe

    reminder to self: "That YOU that you are so proud of is a story woven together by your interpreter module to account for as much of your behavior as it can incorporate, and it denies or rationalizes the rest." "Who's in Charge? Free Will and the Science of the Brain" by Michael S. Gazzaniga

  5. #55
    Temporal Mechanic. Lexicon's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Amargith View Post
    Hey sweety, long time no see


    Ok, so feeding pills to obstinate cats. Here we go:

    2 of mine get/got (Prin) their pills pulverised in some wet food. They are in such a hurry to eat it as they never get this, that they don't notice that there is fine powder mixed in with the jelly

    2 of mine are too finicky for that treatment, and there I pulverise the pills into powder (they have little toys for this, or just use two spoons), then add the tiniest bit of warm water, dissolve it and pull it up into a syringe. That then gets emptied in the back of their throat so that swallowing isn't optional.

    And since two of mine both refuse the food AND drool out the water mixture (yes, I kid you not), I also use the forceful treatment aka, I grab em, put em with their ass against my stomach, lift their chin, open that mouth, chuck it in the back of their throats and hold till they swallow.

    In all of this, except the first method, it is a good thing to start with a small piece of candy and end with a piece of candy to at least somewhat mitigate the negative association you're going to create with the force you'll be using, so you can keep treating them instead of making them completely paranoid and avoidant.

    To facilitate the last method, they also sell what we call 'pill shooters' which is basically a clamp to put the pill right down his throat.


    Or, ya know, you could request your doctor make the medication a syrup - preferably one that most cats like. Mine just had dental surgery and the vet automatically just went for syrups. The two that had the surgery ended up just lapping up the medication like it was candy.

    Oh and lastly - my eating machine of a tom cat at some point needed antibiotics. I was all ready to go force feeding pill down his throat on him - as he is the one that drools out shit - when I accidentally dropped it in front of him. He scarfed it down before I could even grab it. Made my life a whole hell of a lot easier

    So see if he wants some candy. If not, go to plan B


    From what Ive read, you're making great headway in the treatment and things are cautiously optimistic. I'll be keeping my fingers crossed for you two!
    You rock, woman
    03/23 06:06:58 EcK: lex
    03/23 06:06:59 EcK: lex
    03/23 06:21:34 Nancynobullets: LEXXX *sacrifices a first born*
    03/23 06:21:53 Nancynobullets: We summon yooouuu
    03/23 06:29:07 Lexicon: I was sleeping!



    04/25 04:20:35 Patches: Don't listen to lex. She wants to birth a litter of kittens. She doesnt get to decide whats creepy

    02/16 23:49:38 ygolo: Lex is afk
    02/16 23:49:45 Cimarron: she's doing drugs with Jack

    03/05 19:27:41 Time: You can't make chat morbid. Lex does it naturally.

  6. #56
    Temporal Mechanic. Lexicon's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Amargith View Post
    Hey sweety, long time no see


    Ok, so feeding pills to obstinate cats. Here we go:

    2 of mine get/got (Prin) their pills pulverised in some wet food. They are in such a hurry to eat it as they never get this, that they don't notice that there is fine powder mixed in with the jelly

    2 of mine are too finicky for that treatment, and there I pulverise the pills into powder (they have little toys for this, or just use two spoons), then add the tiniest bit of warm water, dissolve it and pull it up into a syringe. That then gets emptied in the back of their throat so that swallowing isn't optional.

    And since two of mine both refuse the food AND drool out the water mixture (yes, I kid you not), I also use the forceful treatment aka, I grab em, put em with their ass against my stomach, lift their chin, open that mouth, chuck it in the back of their throats and hold till they swallow.

    In all of this, except the first method, it is a good thing to start with a small piece of candy and end with a piece of candy to at least somewhat mitigate the negative association you're going to create with the force you'll be using, so you can keep treating them instead of making them completely paranoid and avoidant.

    To facilitate the last method, they also sell what we call 'pill shooters' which is basically a clamp to put the pill right down his throat.


    Or, ya know, you could request your doctor make the medication a syrup - preferably one that most cats like. Mine just had dental surgery and the vet automatically just went for syrups. The two that had the surgery ended up just lapping up the medication like it was candy.

    Oh and lastly - my eating machine of a tom cat at some point needed antibiotics. I was all ready to go force feeding pill down his throat on him - as he is the one that drools out shit - when I accidentally dropped it in front of him. He scarfed it down before I could even grab it. Made my life a whole hell of a lot easier

    So see if he wants some candy. If not, go to plan B


    From what Ive read, you're making great headway in the treatment and things are cautiously optimistic. I'll be keeping my fingers crossed for you two!
    You rock, woman

    Quote Originally Posted by Eilonwy View Post
    Is Jack any better with liquids? If he is, you can ask if the meds come in liquid form. Unfortunately, I found liquids almost as difficult as pills once my cats caught on to what I was doing, but at least I could get them down them quickly. Watch out for the ones that make them foam at the mouth, though. I stayed away from those liquids when I could because most of it seemed to foam out onto my carpet and walls and wherever else my cat could fling it. Also, I've had good luck with transdermal pain meds. Just rub them in the ear. You might want to discuss the transdermal with your vet, though. The most recent data is saying that some transdermal meds aren't as effective. Pain meds, however, seem to do well in transdermal form.

    Hope this was of some help.
    He struggles just as badly with liquids but they are delivered faster with a syringe.. I forgot about that. He had some antibiotics (for a UTI) yrs ago that were liquid (bubblegum flavored ). He didn't foam but he fought a lot. He had a pain patch for his last surgery but had been at the vet a week post-op so I didn't see how well that worked on him, but I'll ask about those, too. Thank you!
    03/23 06:06:58 EcK: lex
    03/23 06:06:59 EcK: lex
    03/23 06:21:34 Nancynobullets: LEXXX *sacrifices a first born*
    03/23 06:21:53 Nancynobullets: We summon yooouuu
    03/23 06:29:07 Lexicon: I was sleeping!



    04/25 04:20:35 Patches: Don't listen to lex. She wants to birth a litter of kittens. She doesnt get to decide whats creepy

    02/16 23:49:38 ygolo: Lex is afk
    02/16 23:49:45 Cimarron: she's doing drugs with Jack

    03/05 19:27:41 Time: You can't make chat morbid. Lex does it naturally.

  7. #57
    Vulnerability Eilonwy's Avatar
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    Oh, and if you don't mind the expense, some pills can be compounded, either into liquid form, or into treat form. They usually come in different flavors, like chicken or liver, and sometimes are more appealing to the cat. Compounding is usually expensive, though. I once paid $30 for a liquid compound, and the treats I was considering at one point were around $50, if I remember correctly.
    Johari / Nohari

    “That we are capable only of being what we are remains our unforgivable sin.” ― Gene Wolfe

    reminder to self: "That YOU that you are so proud of is a story woven together by your interpreter module to account for as much of your behavior as it can incorporate, and it denies or rationalizes the rest." "Who's in Charge? Free Will and the Science of the Brain" by Michael S. Gazzaniga

  8. #58
    The High Priestess Amargith's Avatar
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    Lex, just a thought. See if you can create a positive association with the medication the first time round? Let him sniff it, examine it etc. Introduce it the way you would a treat, or a toy. Often, cats are resistant because of the way we approach them. Our anticipation of how they'll respond gives away that they *should* be resisting us coz something aint right. However, drug companies are aware of this issue and are working at all times to make administration of their product easier. Metacam,for instance, a classic pain killer, was one of the syrups I gave, and it was like icing on the cake for them.

    You can always still stuff it down his throat if he decides it aint for him. But let *him* decide, at least at first

    As for the paw, if you place him against your belly, on his ass, so his paws are tucked in, and yo keep him in place with your elbow while raising his chin, you *should* be able to immobilise him enough so he doesn't tear his stitches. Still, ask your vet for some extra tips, just in case.
    ★ڿڰۣ✿ℒoѵℯ✿ڿڰۣ★





    "Harm none, do as ye will”

  9. #59
    Anew Leaf
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    Ok, question for the cat whisperers of the forum: how do I keep my cat off of the counters in a nice way? He is unfortunately too smart now and knows that when I leave tape sticky side up on things to avoid those things until they are gone.

    Some of it is a health concern in that I don't want pee paws on my counters, and some of it is simply concern for him because I don't want him to burn his paws on the stove or step on a fork or knock over glasses... (He is a BIG kitty... like dog size.)

  10. #60
    The High Priestess Amargith's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Saturned View Post
    Ok, question for the cat whisperers of the forum: how do I keep my cat off of the counters in a nice way? He is unfortunately too smart now and knows that when I leave tape sticky side up on things to avoid those things until they are gone.

    Some of it is a health concern in that I don't want pee paws on my counters, and some of it is simply concern for him because I don't want him to burn his paws on the stove or step on a fork or knock over glasses... (He is a BIG kitty... like dog size.)
    That's a hard one. It depends on his motivation for going there. If you regularly leave food out, it becomes self-rewarding behaviour to check it out and that is impossible to stamp out.

    One of the tricks that exists is a motion detector you can plug into a socket on the counter top, which beeps at him every time he jumps up.

    Another is to fill the kitchen counter for like a month with cans with coins taped inside of them so that he'll get startled - even when you aint there - when he jumps up.

    The problem with both of these methods is something called resistance behaviour and afterwards relapse behaviour. It basically means that he'll first try harder, before the behaviour dies down and that he'll try again in a couple of months after stopping, just to see if he was right to stop.

    Again, this completely depends on his motivation to be on the counters.

    If it is scavenging - and he has been rewarded in that way by getting away with stealing food, then it is pretty much necessary to let him discover for months on ends that there *is* no food there to be found.

    If it is simple curiosity/boredom, you could train him with the methods listed above, but he'll recognise when those measures are taken away - so the motion detector might be your best bet. It would also pay to make another spot more interesting by making it the steady spot to find hidden candy, toys and catnip. If he is restless, a play session a day for 15 minutes might do the trick as well.

    If it is a matter of him wanting to be near you while you re working in the kitchen, or a matter of wanting a spot in that particular territory, it can also be useful to put like a scratching post right next to the countertop. Everytime he is on the countertop you use a fishing rod toy to lure him onto the scratching post and give him a treat there. And make sure that scratching post is like rubbed with catnip, or the IT spot to be. Make it more desirable to be on than the countertop. For all I care, make it his feeding station - it might even help him lose some weight as he'll have to jump up to get his food which may be too much effort for him.


    Whichever training method you choose, depending on your circumstances, it will take 2-3 weeks to get results, and consistency is a big part of it. Relapse typically occurs after a month, month and a half, and if you don't respond correctly at that point, you have just pretty much doomed yourself as an animal that has learned to work for a reward is ten times harder to train than one that has consistently gotten the desired result, so fair warning.

    Or, you could do like I did: shoo them off when IM in the room, knowing full well they'll be on it when I aint, and just do a quick wash of the countertop before I start cooking - and keeping the countertop clear.

    Since your stove shouldn't be on when you re not there, and he ll know that he gets shooed when you are there, that too shouldn't be an issue.

    Take your pick
    ★ڿڰۣ✿ℒoѵℯ✿ڿڰۣ★





    "Harm none, do as ye will”

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