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  1. #11
    Habitual Fi LineStepper JocktheMotie's Avatar
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    I work out in Vibrams, which are essentially barefoot "shoes." They're really sort of just slippers. They're really for running but I don't have any problems with running or with weight lifting at all, moving to these has really helped my knees.



  2. #12
    insert random title here Randomnity's Avatar
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    When I'm motivated enough to do weights/mild cardio, I do them at home and I've never considered putting shoes on, it just seems silly. Haven't broken myself yet. I can't really imagine why you'd need them, although I suppose it might be different for more hardcore workouts?

    Barefoot/minimalist shoe running makes sense to me intuitively, but I hate running and avoid it at all costs, so I haven't really researched it much, let alone tried it.
    -end of thread-

  3. #13
    likes this gromit's Avatar
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    I used to run around barefoot all the time as a kid. I'd run on pavement, gravel, sand, broken shells. My feet were super tough.

    I don't really want to do that in the city though. I have some minimalist shoes (similar to these) that I use for running on the sidewalk or doing stairs or hiking. I built up to it and seems to be fine. I typically run less than 3 miles at a time, though, as I prefer to do interval training over straight-up long distances. Hikes are usually 7-10 miles with significant elevation gain. I like them for hiking because I can wedge my feet into smaller places than with hiking boots and I feel like I get more information from my feet that way. I've never had a problem with needing ankle support with them.

    I actually started to get shin splints from wearing my soccer cleats.

    I think a lot of it depends on the person's feet shape, their stride, etc. Why not try and see how it goes? If you start getting injured, stop?
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  4. #14
    Dali
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    Quote Originally Posted by JocktheMotie View Post
    I work out in Vibrams, which are essentially barefoot "shoes." They're really sort of just slippers. They're really for running but I don't have any problems with running or with weight lifting at all, moving to these has really helped my knees.
    I also have long-standing knee problems which I intuitively sense are aggravated by hampered proprioception of the foot. Hopefully, working out barefoot or VFF will help with that. Have just emailed the nearest store stocking them (VFF, not bare feet. lol) which happens to be in South Africa!. Hope I can get them to ship me a pair. Wish me luck.

    Quote Originally Posted by Randomnity View Post
    When I'm motivated enough to do weights/mild cardio, I do them at home and I've never considered putting shoes on, it just seems silly. Haven't broken myself yet. I can't really imagine why you'd need them, although I suppose it might be different for more hardcore workouts?
    I've heard some people mention that you need the extra stability afforded by sneakers when it comes to squats and lunges but I don't see why you can't strenghten the 'architecture' of your feet such that they accord you the same level of stability. (perhaps @Halla47 could enlighten us?)

    Quote Originally Posted by gromit View Post
    I think a lot of it depends on the person's feet shape, their stride, etc. Why not try and see how it goes? If you start getting injured, stop?
    I shall begin this evening. Wish me luck. Shall keep y'all posted.

  5. #15
    Senior Member King sns's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dali View Post
    @shortnsweets Apparently, experts deem cultures with the best 'foot health' to be those with a barefoot culture. When we walk in shoes, we strike with the heel, as opposed to the ball of the foot/mid-foot as we're supposed to do, contributing to orthopaedic problems. This might be anecdotal but I've heard of numerous people who've had various foot and ankle related problems (shin-splints, bunions, calf pain) lessen dramatically or go away when they shifted to spending considerable amounts of their day barefoot.

    I was wondering whether working out barefoot could be an extension of that, or would that be pushing it?

    I'd also like to hear from people with experience on this.
    Oh, wow. That's interesting. Seems anti-intuitive to me, but my mother always put me in the best shoes as a kid for exercise for the health of my legs and knees, (despite money being tight) so I see "running barefoot" and it sounds alien. I'm also a longer distance runner so it's expensive asics for me. I figure that if you take them away, your shins and knees will have to accept a lot of the shock that could dissipate in the shoe.

    I wonder how this works for people with high arches vs. people with flatter feet.

    Do you have a link?
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  6. #16
    Anew Leaf
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    I would be interested in hearing more from you on this as well.

  7. #17
    Dali
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    @shortnsweet @Saturned A Google search on the benefits of going barefoot should bring up a wealth of resources on the subject. I'd cull the more credible ones for you but I'm feeling kinda P-ish right now. :P

    Perhaps tomorrow.

  8. #18
    royal member Rasofy's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dali View Post
    My only worry is having a 15kg dumbbell drop on my foot. I'd probably thrash half the gym in the ensuing hysterics. Hehehe. The only cardio I do is the elliptical machine which is relatively low-impact so I think I'm good on that front.
    That is quite a scary thought. And it happens. Careful! Perhaps minimalist shoes are the best option.
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  9. #19
    Supreme High Commander Andy's Avatar
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    I've been lifting weights bare foot for years and never had any problems because of it.. I've never done any running that way, but then I've never done much running. Frankly, I'd be worried about bits of brocken glass and the like. I spend most of my free time bare foot. I prefer it.
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  10. #20
    Habitual Fi LineStepper JocktheMotie's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by shortnsweet View Post
    Oh, wow. That's interesting. Seems anti-intuitive to me, but my mother always put me in the best shoes as a kid for exercise for the health of my legs and knees, (despite money being tight) so I see "running barefoot" and it sounds alien. I'm also a longer distance runner so it's expensive asics for me. I figure that if you take them away, your shins and knees will have to accept a lot of the shock that could dissipate in the shoe.

    I wonder how this works for people with high arches vs. people with flatter feet.

    Do you have a link?
    Quote Originally Posted by Saturned View Post
    I would be interested in hearing more from you on this as well.
    A recent summary article.

    http://www.nytimes.com/2011/11/06/ma...mcdougall.html

    It's not so much running barefoot that's important, but how running barefoot forces you to run with better form. Highly padded shoes make it easier to run poorly, if that makes any sense.



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