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  1. #61

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    Quote Originally Posted by shortnsweet View Post
    I'm not a nutritionist either. I just think that someone with no heart disease or risk for heart attack can be a little looser with the diet and even define "healthy" a little different. For me, there's no history of heart disease amongst the women of my family, I have low blood pressure, low resting heart rate, good cholesterol, and a beautiful looking EKG. My activity level is the centerpiece of my health, and diet follows, (even surrounds the activity.)

    Someone with any kind of heart disease or increased risk of heart attack has a slightly different story. Some people have higher cholesterol or high blood pressure, or anything like that is different, because their bodies may react differently to nutrients. (And even exercise.) So, best thing to do is have a doctor that knows your specific medical history and the physiology of your specific disease is suited to be able to tell you how your diet can affect your system. Does that make sense?
    Totally, thank you.

  2. #62
    insert random title here Randomnity's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by burymecloser View Post
    Some studies have reached this conclusion, and a roughly equal number of others have reached the opposite conclusion. Alcohol is generally a huge risk factor for heart disease (as well as innumerable other health issues), and this shouldn't be stated as fact.
    Are you sure about this? I have heard that it's very well-supported by evidence, although I haven't researched it myself. Here are two recent reviews of the literature (i.e. summarizing all the relevant studies in the field), one from January, one from last year: (I didn't pick and choose reviews, these two seemed the most on-topic, but there are several more along the same lines published in the last few years if you search)

    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21261637

    Summary: Coronary heart disease (CHD) is a major and preventable cause of morbidity and death in the United States. Recently, significant research efforts have been directed at an epidemiological phenomenon known as the "French paradox." This observation refers to the coexistence of high risk factors with unanticipated low incidence of CHD, and is postulated to be associated with low-to-moderate consumption of red wine. In vivo studies have shown that red wine intake is more CHD-preventative in comparison to other alcoholic drinks; enhanced cardioprotection may be attributed to grape-derived polyphenols, e.g., resveratrol, in red wine. This review summarizes results of in vitro and animal studies showing that resveratrol exerts multifaceted cardioprotective activities, as well as evidence demonstrating the presence of proteins specifically targeted by resveratrol, as exemplified by N-ribosyldihydronicotinamide:quinone oxidoreductase, NQO2. A mechanism encompassing nongenomic and genomic effects and a research roadmap is proposed as a framework for uncovering further insights on cardioprotection by resveratrol.
    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20391297

    Summary: The term FRENCH PARADOX was coined in 1992 to describe the relatively low incidence of cardiovascular disease in the French population, despite a relatively high dietary intake of saturated fats, and potentially attributable to the consumption of red wine. After nearly 20 years, several studies have investigated the fascinating, overwhelmingly positive biological and clinical associations of red wine consumption with cardiovascular disease and mortality. Light to moderate intake of red wine produces a kaleidoscope of potentially beneficial effects that target all phases of the atherosclerotic process, from atherogenesis (early plaque development and growth) to vessel occlusion (flow-mediated dilatation, thrombosis). Such beneficial effects involve cellular signaling mechanisms, interactions at the genomic level, and biochemical modifications of cellular and plasma components. Red wine components, especially alcohol, resveratrol, and other polyphenolic compounds, may decrease oxidative stress, enhance cholesterol efflux from vessel walls (mainly by increasing levels of high-density lipoprotein cholesterol), and inhibit lipoproteins oxidation, macrophage cholesterol accumulation, and foam-cell formation. These components may also increase nitric oxide bioavailability, thereby antagonizing the development of endothelial dysfunction, decrease blood viscosity, improve insulin sensitivity, counteract platelet hyperactivity, inhibit platelet adhesion to fibrinogen-coated surfaces, and decrease plasma levels of von Willebrand factor, fibrinogen, and coagulation factor VII. Light to moderate red wine consumption is also associated with a favorable genetic modulation of fibrinolytic proteins, ultimately increasing the surface-localized endothelial cell fibrinolysis. Overall, therefore, the "French paradox" may have its basis within a milieu containing several key molecules, so that favorable cardiovascular benefits might be primarily attributable to combined, additive, or perhaps synergistic effects of alcohol and other wine components on atherogenesis, coagulation, and fibrinolysis. Conversely, chronic heavy alcohol consumption and binge drinking are associated with increased risk of cardiovascular events. In conclusion, although mounting evidence strongly supports beneficial cardiovascular effects of moderate red wine consumption (one to two drinks per day; 10-30 g alcohol) in most populations, clinical advice to abstainers to initiate daily alcohol consumption has not yet been substantiated in the literature and must be considered with caution on an individual basis.
    Do you have any information that suggests that an equal number of studies found no effect or a negative effect from moderate consumption? (Nobody is suggesting higher consumption of >1-2 glasses/day is good though, it's very harmful at that level)
    -end of thread-

  3. #63
    nee andante bechimo's Avatar
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    The sooner you adapt to healthy eating, the less you're going to crave or need junk or fast food. One thing I have noticed, is the more processed sugar consumed, the more my body craves it. So I avoid candy, putting sugar in coffee or tea, baked goods, soda pop, etc. For a treat once in awhile, honey is the substitute.

  4. #64
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jenaphor View Post
    The sooner you adapt to healthy eating, the less you're going to crave or need junk or fast food. One thing I have noticed, is the more processed sugar consumed, the more my body craves it. So I avoid candy, putting sugar in coffee or tea, baked goods, soda pop, etc. For a treat once in awhile, honey is the substitute.
    I don't have a sweet tooth, so I don't have to really avoid sugar myself. I had ice cream sitting in my freezer and didn't bother to eat any, even when my wife started eating it in front of me the other day.

    Fried fatty foods on the other hand...



    I also don't like veggies. I was raised to eat them (at one point in my childhood, my "dessert" for lunch in grade school was carrot sticks), but I don't like them. I have to force myself to eat them and I don't care for them in almost any configuration you can think of. I hope my daughter will like them more than I do, because I'd almost rather skip a meal than just eat vegetables.

    Oh well.

  5. #65
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    Key for me is the food's glycemic index. Anything that spikes my blood sugar is off the menu.

    It can be high-calorie-density food and I'll eat it in moderation... but anything with significant sugar or starch is just out.

  6. #66
    nee andante bechimo's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by MacGuffin View Post
    I also don't like veggies. I was raised to eat them (at one point in my childhood, my "dessert" for lunch in grade school was carrot sticks), but I don't like them. I have to force myself to eat them and I don't care for them in almost any configuration you can think of. I hope my daughter will like them more than I do, because I'd almost rather skip a meal than just eat vegetables.
    Have you tried home made stirfry (not the over-oiled, sometimes overcooked or undercooked restaurant veggies) with fresh asian greens? You might like them. I personally aren't fond of mooshy boiled veggies or even steamed ones. Boring.

  7. #67
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    Well, my dad died of a heart attack when I was 19, so I started to eat well after that. I have a friend who went on a radical and austere diet after his dad died (no sugar, animal protein or oils of any kind), and he is now one of the best preserved people I know. He's 59 and looks 40. My brother-in-law looks about 10 years younger than he is, probably because he doesn't drink alcohol or coffee, and eats very carefully. It's somewhat upsetting to my sister that he looks 10 years younger than she does...

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    Quote Originally Posted by Jenaphor View Post
    Have you tried home made stirfry (not the over-oiled, sometimes overcooked or undercooked restaurant veggies) with fresh asian greens? You might like them. I personally aren't fond of mooshy boiled veggies or even steamed ones. Boring.
    Those are okay, but you know what makes it taste 10x better? Adding some meat!

  9. #69
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    Quote Originally Posted by MacGuffin View Post
    Those are okay, but you know what makes it taste 10x better? Adding some meat!
    Not sure if you enjoy seafood, but here's a recipe for meat and veggies.

    Marinate large shrimp in minced ginger, garlic, onion, light soy and cornstarch for around 1/2 hour and then pan fry (only turning once) until slightly opaque with high heat and canola oil. Remove from pan. Then using the same pan retaining pan juices, stir fry baby shanghai bak choy with some light soy (no lid) until done. Add back shrimp, mix then serve on jasmine rice. Yummy as a meal!

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    Quote Originally Posted by Jenaphor View Post
    Not sure if you enjoy seafood, but here's a recipe for meat and veggies.

    Marinate large shrimp in minced ginger, garlic, onion, light soy and cornstarch for around 1/2 hour and then pan fry (only turning once) until slightly opaque with high heat and canola oil. Remove from pan. Then using the same pan retaining pan juices, stir fry baby shanghai bak choy with some light soy (no lid) until done. Add back shrimp, mix then serve on jasmine rice. Yummy as a meal!
    That sounds damn good (plus my wife can eat it, she only eats seafood, dairy, and eggs when it comes to animal protein).

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