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  1. #31
    ¡MI TORTA! Amethyst's Avatar
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    For the most part, I'm soft spoken. I try not to be (and usually am not when it comes to greeting people, or there's a reward involved, like a group interview where you do need to stand out, and speeches) and I'm not when I'm comfortable around others, but for the most part, I'm not. I would say a lot of my soft-spokenness came from attempting to spark conversation with others while I was at a time comfortable doing so, and then being shut down entirely because they thought I was weird or they were antisocial or whatever. It never made sense to me when I tried to create ice-breakers before a class would start, like 'Oh, that weather' or whatever, and people would just ignore or look away or sneer, like you're not supposed to talk or something. I notice now in my classes this semester it's not like that as much, but people say that when they meet me or barely know me, I'm the most quiet and shy soft spoken person they have ever met.

  2. #32
    Senior Member Synapse's Avatar
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    I just learned something when I focus I talk better, like when reading a passage. When I am out of focus I start speaking strongly then end in a fizz with the pronunciation. Also want to know how different accents affect the level of voice speaking and how much. You know when you have that lilt to your voice its interesting. As soon as I am interested in a topic my voice does change to a more legible tone. I mean yes I can talk softly and I do but I should be able to talk reasonably audibly with the way the intonation goes and there is something that is definitely holding, like a clinching. I've always had sinus issues though so that would add to it. Yes being softly spoken may be learned but I also have to say its a combination of factors that might be there that aren't considered and I want to explore that. I mean its too unnatural that clarity goes the way it does sometimes.

    Speaking of which how different do people sound on the phone and in person, there I find that intonations are remarkably different as well. I sound more heavier and in person more lighter speaking.

    Also when I am out of my depth my voice turns into a mouse too.

  3. #33
    Senior Member wildcat's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Synapse View Post
    While others are loud as f@#k!

    Eg. When I worked at a mail center once you could hear this freak of nature of a man from the other side of the room, what I thought was screaming, talking. It was so annoying I wanted to stick a rifle up his ass. Work people said, oh that's just normal, he's always like that. I would understand if he had hearing aid, you know half deaf. But no's this guy you could practically hear everything he said a mile away.

    Is it medical or just learned behavior to be softly or loudly spoken?

    Because quite frankly I used to be softly spoken too, ah well, I still am by particle degrees. Especially when I get that stoned look on my face and I just haven't got the energy to say diddly.

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  4. #34
    Senor Membrane
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    Quote Originally Posted by Synapse View Post
    I just learned something when I focus I talk better, like when reading a passage.
    This is interesting. It's like, when I am actually reading something out loud, I must not focus too much, or I will start to mess up the words that I am saying and the words I am reading. It's like I am reading a bit ahead of what I am saying, and if I focus too much I start to jump over some words (saying what I am reading instead of what I should be saying)

    But I know what you mean. I start to use really fancy words when I focus on what I am saying... but yeah, I speak very clearly then (If people understand the words).

    Quote Originally Posted by Synapse View Post
    I should be able to talk reasonably audibly with the way the intonation goes and there is something that is definitely holding, like a clinching. I've always had sinus issues though so that would add to it.
    You know, I had this short course in throat singing some years ago, and the thing I realized there was that it is really very hard for anyone to just let their voice do what it is meant to do. The teacher (funny japanese guru-type) told us "You need to throw out your voice!" And I kinda understood what he meant, but it was extremely difficult. I think it is learned behavior to restrict the voice. I think this comes from the idea that shouting is bad manners. When was the last time you shouted as loud as you could?

  5. #35
    Senior Member Synapse's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by nolla View Post
    When was the last time you shouted as loud as you could?
    Middle of the night sometime in a car when I was working a late night shift where none could hear. I tried to yell and scream as much as I could out of frustration. And my voice constricted, dried up and I could taste a bit of blood. I did yell but it wasn't at full booming capacity. Its strange its a bit like long distance running, afterwords I am out of breath and can taste blood and phlegm.

  6. #36
    Senor Membrane
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    What kind of posture you have? You stand/sit straight or somehow a little collapsed? Or is it very rigid?

  7. #37
    Senior Member Synapse's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by nolla View Post
    What kind of posture you have? You stand/sit straight or somehow a little collapsed? Or is it very rigid?
    I slouch when I sit. I stand loose when I stand, a bit fidgety. Tries to sit straight but more collapsed.

  8. #38
    Senor Membrane
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    Yeah, I slouch too... been trying to stretch in order to at least sometimes get the spine in the correct position. I think it has a lot to do with the lungs functioning. I can notice it having an effect. Have you ever tried Chi Kung? I should be doing them, they are real good exercises for this...

  9. #39
    Happy Dancer uumlau's Avatar
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    Or just try dancing.
    An argument is two people sharing their ignorance.

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  10. #40
    Dali
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    I read Tallulah's comment and remembered something else. In classical singing, voices are split into various categories based on vocal range, vocal weight, colour and tessitura (comfortable singing range) (amongst other parameters). One prime parameter is vocal weight; namely, the 'heaviness' or 'lightness' of a particular voice. Lyric voices (lyric tenors, lyric sopranos, lyrics basses... et al) typically have a smoother, more mellow and 'lighter' voices than dramatic voices which tend to be richer, more powerful and all around 'bigger' voices. Singers are cast in roles based on their vocal types. Hence, a lyric-soprano trying to sing the role of Salome will be just about inaudible in the massive orchestration which that opera requires and, conversely, a dramatic-soprano trying to sing the role of Adina will pretty much be akin to a bull in a china shop and not gel with the delicate aural textures of that particular opera. I digress, dramatic-voiced singers have naturally thicker vocal cords which are necessary to produce the more powerful sound. I suspect that many of these people that are soft-spoken have 'lyric' voices with thinner-vocal cords and the uber-loud folks are some of these 'dramatic' voiced types who may be not entirely cognisant of just how bloody loud they are. lol

    Of course, projection and tessitura (when speaking) play a part too.

    Quote Originally Posted by Tallulah View Post
    I just don't have a naturally loud voice. I learned to project when I was doing theatre, and I speak decently loudly in the classroom. I wish my voice was naturally louder, especially for singing purposes. I sing in a band, and our other singer is as loud as an electric guitar. I get drowned out very easily. It's annoying.

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