User Tag List

First 2345 Last

Results 31 to 40 of 42

  1. #31
    Another awesome member. Curator's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    MBTI
    eNFP
    Enneagram
    9
    Posts
    901

    Default

    the medicines can be really helpful when used occasionally, unfortunately when used on a regular basis your body comes to depend on them, it actually destroys your brains ability to receive the normal chemicals signals that say "calm down" so you are completely reliant on the meds, your tolerance also increases, so you have to eventually start taking higher and higher doses, till eventually you have to stop as the higher doses will eventually kill you, primarily through organ damage, and then when you stop, it can take your brain on average 1-3 years to heal and recover the ability to accept the chemical signals to sooth yourself...some people recover much faster, some people can take much longer to recover... I have not used them myself more than a few times (lorazepam), so I do not personally know of how horrible the withdrawals are, but ive had them related to me but a few friends who described it as a total hell...

  2. #32
    Senior Member Fan.of.Devin's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    MBTI
    INTP
    Enneagram
    4w5
    Socionics
    INT-
    Posts
    294

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by LunaLuminosity View Post
    It's weird how on a thread with people who've actually gone through an anxiety disorder, that the advice is usually like "the meds are EVIL... run from them as long as you can!"
    I don't recall seeing anyone say that "meds are evil"; I see numerous people saying that benzodiazepines are highly addictive and counterproductive to treating anxiety in the long term, which is a completely reasonable stance to take.

    And in general, yes, one really should avoid medication if one has not yet exhausted all other practical therapeutic avenues. Any responsible psychiatrist would agree with this sentiment.

    Taking benzos long term to treat anxiety is asking for trouble, in the form of a devastating positive-feedback loop...
    INTP 4w5 SX/SP
    Tritype 4/5/8

  3. #33
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    MBTI
    I?FP
    Posts
    26

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by LunaLuminosity View Post
    The attitude here is suprisingly chill for people who've been through this same neurochemical sickness.
    Hopefully we are on the same page on treating the illness of anxiety, not the state of anxiety (which has situational causation and goes away when that situation is remedied, and the talking-type therapy is highly useful), and that for the illness, at least some sort of medical attention is needed ASAP.
    With me personally, I was too shy to speak up that I thought I needed medicine, and anything that might altar my state of mind scared the crap out of me. A lot of my response on how medicine is not necessary comes from me trying err shall I say "idealize" my past and how everything happened.

    If it is debilitating, I most definitely recommend talking to a therapist. I'm not aware of all the options but I know people have mentioned that. I am just skeptical of taking meds and not addressing the root of anxiety in the first place, which I have seen people in my extended family do.

  4. #34
    Klingon Warrior Princess Patches's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    MBTI
    ISTJ
    Enneagram
    6w5 sp/sx
    Posts
    5,312

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by LunaLuminosity View Post
    It's weird how on a thread with people who've actually gone through an anxiety disorder, that the advice is usually like "the meds are EVIL... run from them as long as you can!"

    After about my 10th panic attack, I was begging for pretty much anything that would stop me from going through that ever again. Getting medication early is probably one of the best decisions I've made in my life. Though it wasn't really a decision, there's no way I could've gone another week without something to adjust my chemistry.

    The attitude here is suprisingly chill for people who've been through this same neurochemical sickness.
    Hopefully we are on the same page on treating the illness of anxiety, not the state of anxiety (which has situational causation and goes away when that situation is remedied, and the talking-type therapy is highly useful), and that for the illness, at least some sort of medical attention is needed ASAP.
    My experience with psychiatrists is that they tend to have a "Throw medication at it first, ask questions later" attitude. I dislike this. Like I said in my post, there are people who truly legitimately need this medication. And thats 100% fine. I just wish more doctors would consider breathing techniques/exercises/life choices/etc that can drastically reduce anxiety... Medication should be a backup plan. Not the 1st option. Even for the illness, not situational anxiety, making changes in your daily routine can release chemicals in your brain that combat the chemical imbalance that is happening. It's an effective and legitimate form of treatment for many people.

    I think people (especially Americans) are over-medicated in general. When it comes to psychoactive medication, antibiotics, everything. "Something is wrong.... Lets throw a pill at it".
    “Everybody has a secret world inside of them. All of the people of the world, I mean everybody. No matter how dull and boring they are on the outside, inside
    them they've all got unimaginable, magnificent, wonderful, stupid, amazing worlds. Not just one world. Hundreds of them. Thousands maybe.” -Neil Gaiman

    ~

  5. #35
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    MBTI
    I?FP
    Posts
    26

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Patches View Post
    My experience with psychiatrists is that they tend to have a "Throw medication at it first, ask questions later" attitude. I dislike this. Like I said in my post, there are people who truly legitimately need this medication. And thats 100% fine. I just wish more doctors would consider breathing techniques/exercises/life choices/etc that can drastically reduce anxiety... Medication should be a backup plan. Not the 1st option. Even for the illness, not situational anxiety, making changes in your daily routine can release chemicals in your brain that combat the chemical imbalance that is happening. It's an effective and legitimate form of treatment for many people.

    I think people (especially Americans) are over-medicated in general. When it comes to psychoactive medication, antibiotics, everything. "Something is wrong.... Lets throw a pill at it".
    Agreed! 100%

  6. #36
    Another awesome member. Curator's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    MBTI
    eNFP
    Enneagram
    9
    Posts
    901

    Default

    I feel similarly, and considering many of these pills also create issues that they are then told they need another pill to deal with, its a vicious cycle, that im not sure is really in the patients best interest most of the time...if ever... crying is one of the most potent stress/anxiety reducers out there, not just psychologically, it physiologically exists for such purposes, in the case of women they have actually found it produces a pheromone that reduces aggression and sexual arousal in men. If I find the article again I will link it up for anyone interested, its kinda cool

  7. #37
    Senior Member Tiltyred's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    MBTI
    INFP
    Enneagram
    468 sx/sp
    Socionics
    EII None
    Posts
    4,383

    Default

    People don't go to psychiatrists until they've tried everything else they know how to do. Psychiatrists are expensive and the good ones are hard to get with. A good one can listen to you talk for an hour while saying nothing, and at the end, scribble a prescription and send you on your way -- and two weeks later wow, you're feeling much better, having taken the prescription(s), and NOW you can talk about whatever might have been precipitating your problem.

    Some conditions really are not correctable by thinking good thoughts and breathing deep. Sometimes medications are incredibly beneficial. Including, even, addictive ones like Xanax. I've had a bottle of Xanax in my purse for the past probably 10 years. The prescription expires before I refill it, so you can imagine from that how seldom I take it, but when I need it, I take it and I'm grateful for it. It's possible to use medication responsibly and not get addicted.

  8. #38
    Another awesome member. Curator's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    MBTI
    eNFP
    Enneagram
    9
    Posts
    901

    Default

    I agree, but most psychiatrists prescribe them to be taken in irresponsible ways, my friend was prescribed 1 mg lorazepam 3 times a day, to deal with his severe anxiety, after he got used to it enough to remain concious most of the time, he realized he couldnt function at all that way and tried to reduce his dose, then went into a crazy downward spiral worse than he had ever had be4 in which he ended up being found wandering around aimlessly by cops hundreds of miles away from home recently here, and admitted to a hospital...

    I think the usage you describe tilty is definitely what I would consider a useful and responsible use of such meds, but unfortunately, people are told to use far more than they really need... and most people just do what they are told...

  9. #39
    Senior Member Tiltyred's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    MBTI
    INFP
    Enneagram
    468 sx/sp
    Socionics
    EII None
    Posts
    4,383

    Default

    Did he tell his doctor he was overmedicated?

  10. #40
    Another awesome member. Curator's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    MBTI
    eNFP
    Enneagram
    9
    Posts
    901

    Default

    yes, his doc said to give it another month, and this is after he told him that whenever he was conscious he would constantly be thinking about killing himself, when he could think clearly, he gave it almost another month, took one less pill one day (didnt take his afternoon pill) then he flipped out and disappeared that night

    Edit: I should also point out, that he has never had a history of such behavior be4, he has never flipped out like this...

Similar Threads

  1. Medication for Adult ADD
    By Crabs in forum General Psychology
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 11-16-2015, 03:49 PM
  2. [ENFP] Advice for an ENFP with anxiety
    By niffer in forum The NF Idyllic (ENFP, INFP, ENFJ, INFJ)
    Replies: 8
    Last Post: 11-02-2011, 09:28 PM
  3. F's and Depression or Anxiety Medication
    By Santosha in forum General Psychology
    Replies: 46
    Last Post: 06-16-2011, 11:30 PM
  4. Medical journals are just shameless shills for drug companies
    By Quinlan in forum Science, Technology, and Future Tech
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 09-30-2010, 09:41 PM
  5. Survey for Those with Shyness or Social Anxiety Disorder
    By Mempy in forum General Psychology
    Replies: 19
    Last Post: 12-25-2008, 02:20 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
Single Sign On provided by vBSSO