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  1. #11
    Per Ardua Metamorphosis's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Economica View Post
    Am I really the first one to mention that the likely cause of your lethargy is, ironically, your lack of exercise? Using energy gives you energy.

    The exception is getting started. If you've been inactive for years, your first workouts will kill you. But it gets much, much better. Trust me.
    True stuff. I go to the gym at 6:30 every morning and I'm much more awake for the rest of the day than when I used to wake up at like 10:00.
    "You will always be fond of me. I represent to you all the sins you never had the courage to commit."

    Reason is, and ought only to be the slave of the passions, and can never pretend to any other office
    than to serve and obey them. - David Hume

  2. #12
    Furry Critter with Claws Kiddo's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Metamorphosis View Post
    True stuff. I go to the gym at 6:30 every morning and I'm much more awake for the rest of the day than when I used to wake up at like 10:00.
    My current schedule inhibits me from getting the kind of morning exercise that I would like, but I will plan for it next semester.

  3. #13
    Senior Member xNFJiminy's Avatar
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    Have you had a blood test, or better yet, a mineral test from a hair sample? Consider allergies to gluten, dairy, soya and egg. They can cause symptoms like that, especially gluten. Is your food certified organic, not old and withered, not processed, and not over-cooked? Do any of the supposedly healthy foods contain hydrogenated oils, aspartame or monosodium glutamate, under any of their many aliases? Have you been tested for thyroid function? Do you drink tea or does your drinking water contain artificial or naturally high flouride levels? Is there any other possibly toxic presence in your life that you're aware of? If none of these apply, I'm stumped.

    You don't have to live like that though. I'd do more research and see as many professionals as necessary.

  4. #14
    Furry Critter with Claws Kiddo's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by xNFJiminy View Post
    Have you had a blood test
    Yes

    or better yet, a mineral test from a hair sample?
    No

    Consider allergies to gluten, dairy, soya and egg. They can cause symptoms like that, especially gluten.
    How do you determine allergies without an allergy test?

    Is your food certified organic, not old and withered, not processed, and not over-cooked? Do any of the supposedly healthy foods contain hydrogenated oils, aspartame or monosodium glutamate, under any of their many aliases?
    Ok, maybe not ultra healthy food. By I think I eat a fairly balanced diet even if it does contain a lot of preservatives and isn't high grade.

    Have you been tested for thyroid function?
    Yes

    Do you drink tea
    I used to.

    does your drinking water contain artificial or naturally high flouride levels?
    I'm not sure. I don't think so. How would I know?

    Is there any other possibly toxic presence in your life that you're aware of?
    Nothing that I can think of.

    You don't have to live like that though. I'd do more research and see as many professionals as necessary.
    I'm poor.

  5. #15
    not to be trusted miss fortune's Avatar
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    blood tests actually can be the first diagnostic step for problems with gluten! I used to permanently feel like my ass was kicked before I had to give up gluten containing food- 0 energy- they can run a blood test for that pretty cheaply, and if you're a student it is sometimes free at the student health center

  6. #16
    Senior Member xNFJiminy's Avatar
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    What I described isn't ultra-healthy, it's just what we're designed to eat. Some people seem to react more severely to the grossly inadequate standard Western diet than others. It's in the genes. There's a study done somewhere showing that even with five portions of fruit and vegetables every day, volunteers are still below the recommended daily intake of vitamin C (important for brain function) if those foods aren't organic. It's more to do with the lack of crop rotation and soil care than the pesticides themselves (although many of those are thought to cause cancer).

    I think blood tests only detect allergies, not other kinds of reactions to gluten. Sometimes a dietician or nurse tests for allergies by putting a sample on the skin and pricking it, to see if there's a response. The way that seems to be the most fool-proof is just eliminating the suspected items for several weeks. You should only do this if you're very clued up about nutrition and know what you're doing or have a professional guiding you, because what you eliminate might currently be your main source of certain things or what you replace them with may do even more harm.

    I recommend you (actually, everyone) read this page about it. Gotta be worth consideration.

  7. #17
    Senior Membrane spirilis's Avatar
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    I used to be like that, and sometimes still do but nowadays it's usually due to a genuine lack of sleep than anything.

    The cure for my more chronic fatigue was better diet and the addition of some supplements-- specifically, a multivitamin and fish oil (one that's higher in DHA than EPA). I tried Coenzyme Q-10 (100mg) for a while and it seemed to help with overall energy, although eventually it got to the point where taking it for a week in a row caused me to sleep lightly and clench my teeth (like it was amplifying stress or something) so I stopped it.

    Nowadays I don't feel that chronic fatigue anymore, but I do get acute fatigue if I don't sleep the appropriate amount. Gaining weight also increases the incident of fatigue and I find I have to nap more often. (I am trying to lose it now)

  8. #18
    not to be trusted miss fortune's Avatar
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    actually blood tests are used in the diagnosis of celiac disease as well- and you're never supposed to eliminate a food from your diet until it is confirmed that that food is the problem- otherwise you will mess up the diagnostic process on what's wrong with you! sorry for the mini-lecture

  9. #19
    Senior Member xNFJiminy's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by spirilis View Post
    The cure for my more chronic fatigue was better diet and the addition of some supplements-- specifically, a multivitamin and fish oil (one that's higher in DHA than EPA).
    Those are great. Well, some versions are. A lot of them, most of them don't contain the recommended amount or the right proportion of fatty acids. And you want a purified one or one from cultivated algae, with no mercury or other contaminants.

  10. #20
    Senior Member xNFJiminy's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by whatever View Post
    actually blood tests are used in the diagnosis of celiac disease as well- and you're never supposed to eliminate a food from your diet until it is confirmed that that food is the problem- otherwise you will mess up the diagnostic process on what's wrong with you! sorry for the mini-lecture
    Yes, but I wouldn't assume that if a blood test has been done, you'd have been told if you have it or not. Most people with even classic coeliac disease seem to go years looking for a diagnosis, so it's wise to ask to be tested specifically for gluten intolerance. Some medical doctors recommend the diet test to see if symptoms go away. A blood test might be preferred first though, depending on whether you find the needle more or less daunting than the diet change.

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