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  1. #11
    mrs disregard's Avatar
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    Why don't you just stick to xanax?

  2. #12
    Emerging Tallulah's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by disregard View Post
    Why don't you just stick to xanax?
    That's what I'm wondering--if your symptoms are anxiety-related and not depression-related, I don't see any reason you should be on Lexapro or Wellbutrin. Xanax worked extremely well for me when I was having panic attacks.

    I've taken Lexapro and Wellbutrin--if I remember correctly, the Lexapro didn't do much but make me gain a few pounds, and the Wellbutrin made me kind of jumpy. My hand would tremble, like Jennifer said, and it was hard to sleep at night. Effexor worked a little too well for me--it all but eliminated my depressive feelings, leading me to feel like nothing was amiss--and making sure that I would continue the cycle of expecting too much of myself. I'm not on anything right now.
    Something Witty

  3. #13
    Senior Member Anja's Avatar
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    Sorry to hear that you aren't feeling up to par, Jen.

    It goes without saying that your best bet for prescribing psychoactives is a Psychiatrist. An MD is going to be even more hit and miss than a Psych has to be.

    I do think the key to effective use of them is dependent on regular communication with your doctor about what you are doing with them and they will work best when used as prescribed. If, of course, the person doing the prescribing knows what they are doing. Heh.

    It does seem to take people a week or two of possibly irritating side effects before the body adjusts so it requires some patience and willingness on the patient's part to hang in until they kick in and their cummulative effect begins to bring some relief.

    And that can be a problem as you are noticing. When a person is already on edge it's hard to work up that kind of drive to deal with it.

    Because all of the psychoactive drugs work differently depending on the individual, asking others how any one of them has worked for them isn't always a good predictor of how they will work for you.

    Sending energy your way.
    "No ray of sunshine is ever lost, but the green which it awakes into existence needs time to sprout, and it is not always granted to the sower to see the harvest. All work that is worth anything is done in faith." - Albert Schweitzer

  4. #14
    Lallygag Moderator Geoff's Avatar
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    Is it just me that noticed you are all responding to Jen's posts of about 15 or more months ago?

  5. #15
    unscannable Tigerlily's Avatar
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    Time is a delicate mistress.

  6. #16
    Senior Member Anja's Avatar
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    Oh good grief. How to catch an INFP! Time means so little. . .

    Well, I'll assume that all is better then and will be able to rest with Jen off my Mother Hen list for the night.
    "No ray of sunshine is ever lost, but the green which it awakes into existence needs time to sprout, and it is not always granted to the sower to see the harvest. All work that is worth anything is done in faith." - Albert Schweitzer

  7. #17
    Senior Member Anja's Avatar
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    A couple of comments about depression. Some types of depression do manifest as anxiety.

    But a steady use of Xanax for as long as this thread has been around will have a rebound effect actually creating an anxiety response. Even though it's nearly handed out like candy by some professionals, I've seen withdrawal responses of anxiety in a number of folks which has lasted for upwards of a year. And is not a drug to be taken with little consideration of that nasty effect. Talk about needing patience then!
    "No ray of sunshine is ever lost, but the green which it awakes into existence needs time to sprout, and it is not always granted to the sower to see the harvest. All work that is worth anything is done in faith." - Albert Schweitzer

  8. #18
    Senior Member cloakofsnow's Avatar
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    I found that Effexor (Venlafaxine) worked pretty well. The problem with Effexor though, is that many people say they have a horrific time weaning off of it. I gradually stopped taking it for a time and I had no problems so I guess it depends on the person.

  9. #19
    Artisan Conquerer Halla74's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jen View Post
    Just wondering who has tried either of these medications and what your side effects were. Did they subside after a month or so?

    I am not depressed, but I do feel overwhelmed, anxious and annoyed a lot of the time.

    Everyone I know who has tried Lexapro really likes it so last night I took one 10mg tablet and I feel more anxious and irritated. I kept waking up last night and eventually had to take a half of Xanax just to get back to sleep. Should I take half (5mg) of the Lexapro for a few weeks until my body adjusts to it?

    Prozac is OK, but the 20 mg my DR had me on was making me too jumpy.
    The best antianxiolytics are benzodiazepines (Valium/Diazepam, Xanax/Alprazolam, Ativan/Lorazepam, etc.) but most doctors nowadays insist on prescribing SSRIs/SNRIs because they (purportedly are not addicitive), which I say is B.S.

    If you take any SSRI/SNRI daily for a month or more and then stop, cold turkey, you will have physically uncomfortable side effects, if not a full blown panic attack. Is that not the definition of an addicitve substance? One that when withdrawn from regular administration causes unpleasant side effects?

    Benzodiazepines treat the symptoms of many neurotic disorders. Some people have an addicitive personality, and therefore abuse them, hence the pharmaceutical industries fascination with SSRIs/SNRIs. Oh, did anyone think that its not possible to make a whole lot of money on the benzodiazepines anymore because they are all generics? But you can with new variations of the newer meds!

    I have seen my wife and my mother use SSRIs for over a year and the results were not very good. They did not alleviate the problems, they caused MANY undesirable side effects, and they had to be taken daily.

    So, before jumping on the serotonin bandwagon, think twice. There are other things out there to treat anxiety. Regular exercise and meditation are pretty damn effective actually, you don't need that much medication if your life is in balance.

    Just my .02.

  10. #20
    Minister of Propagandhi ajblaise's Avatar
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    For people who aren't depressed but have anxiety, I think benzodiazepines is the best option if you need medication. Some non-depressed people might benefit from SSRIs/SNRI's, but if you don't have to take these drugs, it might be worth it not too.

    Xanax to some is the strongest, fastest acting (with a short duration), and recreational of the benzos. If you want something that might be more mellow and just as good with helping anxiety, klonopin and valium might be worth looking into.

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