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  1. #11
    Don't pet me. JAVO's Avatar
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    I believe the conclusions of the article because I conducted my own "experiment" last year. I ran barefoot on mostly concrete and asphalt pavement for around 2 weeks. I eventually encountered bleeding blisters which forced me to stop because I hadn't given the skin on the soles of my feet time to adapt. Other than that, I was able to run more and longer distances with less muscle soreness and no left knee pain like I usually experience when overtraining. I think this was due to improved biomechanics due to my feet being able to more accurately sense their position and weight distribution. I hope to try to adapt to barefoot running again when I have more motivation and patience.

  2. #12
    Diabolical Kasper's Avatar
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    ^ That would cane me.

    I agree that more expensive /= better quality but for me that experiment would result in a great deal of leg and back pain. I don't buy the most expensive shoes out there but I don't skimp either, I get my podiatrist to recommend brands and styles that will do what they claim they will. Buying off the shelf without knowing what you need means you're looking at how they feel in the store and how pretty they are, both somewhat meaningless factors for what is going to be best when training. Wearing poor quality shoes has a very bad impact on me.

  3. #13
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    A real life example. My brother is trying to get into shape to go into the military. He's not a runner at all. He went to a running specific store, where they filmed him running on a treadmill, and determined that he was an overpronator. So they recommended several shoes, and he went home with a pair of Brooks that are designed to correct overpronation.

    He's been running for about four weeks now, gradually increasing his mileage. But he's been experiencing knee pain, which has gradually been getting worse, and this week he's stopped running to take a break from his injury.

    I told him if his biomechanics were correct, his joints should be getting stronger, and he should be experiencing less pain and soreness than he did the first week he started.

    The Brooks he bought, were coincidentally the same Brooks I had bought over a year ago. I had the exact same experience with them. They were hurting my knees even when I was using them as casual shoes and no longer running. I since have given them away.


    My knees stopped hurting when I switched back to my Nike Frees, and I am convinced by this personal experience, that I don't need arch support, stability control, and excess cushioning. I don't need a prosthetic altering and controlling the natural motion of my foot. All I need are for my feet to be strong and support themselves, they know how to take it from there.

    If you consider why overpronation occurs in the first place, which is the collapse of the arch upon weight bearing, then it should make sense that a pair of shoes designed only to treat the symptoms will do nothing more than act as a crutch. The problem should be treated at the cause, which is your weak arches causing your feet to flatten.


    http://www.eons.com/uploads/3/1/3156...%20Forever.pdf

    Orton is part of a growing movement of Free Your Feet rebels, who believe it's not running that causes injuries, but running form and economy of training. One of the more vocal -- and surprising -- members of this group is Gerard Hartmann, Ph.D., an exercise physiologist who works with the world's greatest marathoners and also consults for Nike. According to Hartmann, the vast majority of running-related foot injuries are a result of too much foam-injected pampering. Running shoes have become so supercushioned and motion-controlling, they allow our foot muscles to atrophy and our tendons to shorten and stiffen. Without strength and flexibility, injuries are inevitable.
    "The deconditioned musculature of the foot is the greatest issue leading to injury," Hartmann explains. "If I give you a collar to wear around your neck, in 4 to 6 weeks, we'll find 40 to 60 percent atrophy of musculature. That's why this emphasis on cushioning and motion control makes no sense.
    One of Hartmann's star clients, marathon world-record holder Paula Radcliffe, has been training in the Nike Free, a new, minimalist slipper designed to mimic the range of motion of a naked foot. Alan Webb, America's best miler, also works out in the Free. Webb had been hobbled by foot injuries early in his career, but after he started barefoot exercises, his injuries disappeared, and his shoe size shrank, from a 12 to a 9. "My foot muscles became so strong, they pulled my arches up," says Webb. "Wearing too much shoe prevents you from tapping into the natural gait you have when landing on the ground."
    Full text here: http://www.eons.com/uploads/3/1/3156...%20Forever.pdf

  4. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by JAVO View Post
    I believe the conclusions of the article because I conducted my own "experiment" last year. I ran barefoot on mostly concrete and asphalt pavement for around 2 weeks. I eventually encountered bleeding blisters which forced me to stop because I hadn't given the skin on the soles of my feet time to adapt. Other than that, I was able to run more and longer distances with less muscle soreness and no left knee pain like I usually experience when overtraining. I think this was due to improved biomechanics due to my feet being able to more accurately sense their position and weight distribution. I hope to try to adapt to barefoot running again when I have more motivation and patience.
    Try a pair of Vibram Five Fingers. Essentially a sock, with a rubber bottom to protect your feet from abrasion.

    If those are too much, you can try making your own flat rubber sandals from a old tire and some straps of leather:

    YouTube - How to Wear Tarahumara Huarache Running Sandals

  5. #15
    Member nocebo's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by phoenity View Post
    Try a pair of Vibram Five Fingers. Essentially a sock, with a rubber bottom to protect your feet from abrasion.[/url]
    Yeah, I have the SPRINT version, and they're amazing!
    Before that, I used to run in layered socks. Just buy the thickest socks available and wear them on-top of each other. (This doesn't really work in rain or snow though)

    My ankles and knees began hurting after a few years of running with sneakers, and I'm pretty convinced they also lead to flat-feet. Be weary of those... things.

  6. #16
    Member nocebo's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by phoenity View Post
    If you consider why overpronation occurs in the first place, which is the collapse of the arch upon weight bearing, then it should make sense that a pair of shoes designed only to treat the symptoms will do nothing more than act as a crutch. The problem should be treated at the cause, which is your weak arches causing your feet to flatten.
    True story!
    I'm very skeptical of doctors who claim it's a part of old age, or that some feet as "just like that". It doesn't make sense. Your arches are flexible enough to develop well into your adolescence.

  7. #17
    Minister of Propagandhi ajblaise's Avatar
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    Maybe I'm oblivious, but I notice zero difference in between different shoes. I might as well be wearing cleats.

  8. #18
    Diabolical Kasper's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ajblaise View Post
    Maybe I'm oblivious, but I notice zero difference in between different shoes. I might as well be wearing cleats.
    If you had problems with your feet, legs or back you'd notice.

  9. #19
    Don't pet me. JAVO's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by phoenity View Post
    Try a pair of Vibram Five Fingers. Essentially a sock, with a rubber bottom to protect your feet from abrasion.

    If those are too much, you can try making your own flat rubber sandals from a old tire and some straps of leather:

    YouTube - How to Wear Tarahumara Huarache Running Sandals
    Great ideas! Thanks!

  10. #20
    Senior Member avolkiteshvara's Avatar
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    I remember reading some article about this guy that was a regular marathoner. He had shin splints all the time and plantar facitis.

    He went down to the copper canyon in Mexico to train with the tarahumara indians. Basically they just wear these crudely constructed sandals. He all his chronic injuries went away and he became the strongest runner he's ever been.

    I think it was in Men's Health. Also I know alot of the Crossfit guys believe in no shoes.

    Seems like there are two schools of thought:

    Support/comfort(shoes, orthotics, etc) vs letting foot develop naturally.

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