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  1. #31
    insert random title here Randomnity's Avatar
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    oo thanks guys. I don't have milk jugs though (we buy milk in bags here) but I'm sure there's some equivalent I could figure out.

    what is a dip using a chair?

    also I heard that using few reps (with as heavy as possible) will make you stronger (rather than building muscle mass). is that true? is it the same thing for sets? or are you always supposed to do the same # of sets?

    hehe, I know nothing.
    -end of thread-

  2. #32
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    Let's put it this way, for you, 6-10 repetitions will work fine. You'll probably see some definition appear in your arms after a bit, but don't mistake that for mass. Most females don't put on mass nearly as quickly as a male.

    And don't worry about more sets, just do three per exercise to start. Then see how well you do.

  3. #33
    Senior Member Feops's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by wolfy View Post
    It gets difficult to add weight if you don't build the reps.
    The most simple way is
    example
    3x8
    1x9 2x8
    2x9 1x8
    3x9

    and so on until you get to 3x12
    then lower the reps and increase the weight.
    That sounds logical. Though, is that for beginners, veterns, or both? My understanding is that newbies gain strength/mass fairly quickly to a point, assuming they eat proper, so it was possible to climb steadily in weight for the first while.

    It was also my understanding that for mass gain, heavy and fewer is better.

    Quote Originally Posted by Biaxident View Post
    I watched one kid try to bench 225lbs(102kg) with two of his friends as spotters. I just finished my set, and looked over in time to see the twit tell his friends to let go with the weight fully extended, his arms immediately gave out, and he literally cracked his sternum when the bar hit it, then smashed his nose as he tried to roll the bar off himself. His spotters just stood there for a minute trying to figure out what to do. The guy behind the desk called 911, and they had the ambulance take him to the E.R.
    That's so stupid... 225? Really? I thought 100 was a good starting point, though I've upped that to 115.

  4. #34
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    Quote Originally Posted by Feops View Post

    It was also my understanding that for mass gain, heavy and fewer is better.
    Anywhere between 6 and 12 reps is maximal growth territory.

    Quote Originally Posted by Feops View Post
    That's so stupid... 225? Really? I thought 100 was a good starting point, though I've upped that to 115.
    Yup, and the kids couldn't have weighed more than 135 each. You sure you haven't seen anyone making idiots of themselves at a gym?

  5. #35
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    I should start lifting again. Here's where I'm at. I weigh 175, (5'10'') but have a low body fat percentage. I don't work out or exercise at all, and I could probably bench my weight or 10 pounds more than that at best. (Maxing out.) I seem to be at a good starting point because I'm not exactly scrawny and weak. A little over a year ago, I weight lifted for 3 months and quit like an idiot. I think my lack of gains demotivated me, it certainly didn't help. I was heavy lifting on low reps for power. I wasn't taking supplements, I tried to do better with my diet, but it probably could have been better, and I'll bet I wasn't sleeping enough. (I'd hit my muscle groups hard and let them heal for an entire week.) At the end of those three months, I had lost a little weight and I was able to put up more. I was about 165 or 170 and could max out on 205 on the bench press. (How egotistical of me to keep checking!) I think I lost weight because I quit eating junk food and drinking soda. A while after I quit, I remember reading that working your legs could actually make your upper body stronger because gaining muscle anywhere raises your testosterone, and legs are a great way to do that. I don't think I was hitting my legs hard enough, then.

    As of now, I still have a bench in my basement and way more weight than I'd ever need to rep with. I'm sure I can use that bar and those weights in a few different ways since that's all I've got. I just don't know if I can afford the kind of diet that I should be eating to gain all that strength.

    Any ideas for giving this a second go? Maybe I was doing pretty well before and just got impatient and lazy...
    "When a resolute young fellow steps up the great bully, the world, and takes him boldly by the beard, he is often surprised to find that it comes off in his hand, and that it was only tied on to scare away the timid adventurers." - Ralph Waldo Emerson

  6. #36

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    If you want to do low reps and you want mass you'll have to do a lot of sets. Like maybe the old Doug Hepburn routine.
    You want to 24-50 total reps on each exercise.

    Initially you see mostly strength gains. Nervous system adapting to the lifting. Do it for six months at least. After six months you'll never be able to give up.

  7. #37
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    Oh, wow. I was doing less than that, that's for sure. Is it advisable to switch up between heavy weights and low reps and light weights with many reps? I had forgotten until now, but I think after every other week or so, I'd do lighter reps more often. I don't know if that's a good idea or if I should just keep it simple. I don't even know why I'm going for the heavy weights, really. I want to be stronger, look better, and feel better. I guess any kind of lifting will help you out there. Faster strength gains with heavy weights and low reps. For some reason, I decided to go that route. I used to read contradicting advice online when I'd research it.
    "When a resolute young fellow steps up the great bully, the world, and takes him boldly by the beard, he is often surprised to find that it comes off in his hand, and that it was only tied on to scare away the timid adventurers." - Ralph Waldo Emerson

  8. #38

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    The 2 main ways to get stronger are

    Maximal Effort 85+%
    nervous system adaptation, tendon strength, muscular density

    Repetition Method 70-85% bodybuilding method
    hypertrophy

    There is one other way the...

    Dynamic Method
    60%
    Lifting weights explosively. But it's more sport specific.

    You need to mix the first 2 in your training. I can tell you some ways if you like.

  9. #39
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    Quote Originally Posted by wolfy View Post
    The 2 main ways to get stronger are

    Maximal Effort 85+%
    nervous system adaptation, tendon strength, muscular density

    Repetition Method 70-85% bodybuilding method
    hypertrophy

    There is one other way the...

    Dynamic Method
    60%
    Lifting weights explosively. But it's more sport specific.

    You need to mix the first 2 in your training. I can tell you some ways if you like.
    What Wolfy said.



    And as long as you are getting reasonable amounts of protein in your regular diet, and aren't eating a lot of junk, you shouldn't have to worry about supplements for the first 6 months or so.

  10. #40
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    Are those percentages based on the maximum amount you can lift? Say my max bench is only 180 now, 85% is roughly 155, so I should work out with that? And I need to mix both ways of training. Okay, that's kind of what I was doing last year. Thinking back now, though, I don't think I was stressing my muscles enough because I didn't do as many sets as I was supposed to. When I started, I'd always be sore, and then I stopped getting sore no matter how much I lifted. I probably would have if I'd done 3 or 4 more sets. I don't know.

    I'm not trying to make you guys into my personal trainers. I don't want to bother you too much. I'd feel guilty asking for all kinds of specific advice when I could probably look it up somewhere. Thanks for your help!

    Addition: I just went and lifted for the first time in a very long time. I already feel good. I remember finishing up and feeling like I could bust through a wall.
    "When a resolute young fellow steps up the great bully, the world, and takes him boldly by the beard, he is often surprised to find that it comes off in his hand, and that it was only tied on to scare away the timid adventurers." - Ralph Waldo Emerson

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