User Tag List

First 123412 Last

Results 11 to 20 of 176

  1. #11
    Charting a course
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    MBTI
    INFP
    Posts
    3,638

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Feops View Post
    Wow.

    I've been lifting for.. um... a month. I got tired of the generic "tall skinny guy" build and and I've used it as an excuse to better my diet too.

    Hopefully I've hit all the newbie "your body is angry at you for changing your habits" points by now. Eesh. :ouch:

    Did a lot of research but decided to keep it simple. Three workouts a week, alternating between Squat/Bench/Dead and Squat/Press/Rows. Sit ups on days without weights. Sunday off. Will probably throw some additional cardio into the sit up days soon.
    Don't know how I missed this yesterday.

    If you're looking to build muscle you have to give your muscles time to recover. Especially when you start out. You picked good exercises, but it sounds like you are doing them more than once a week. Once a week is more than enough for at least the first year. And you want to work hard enough that you are sore for at least two days afterward.

    And don't overdo the cardio, otherwise all the work to build muscle is wasted.

  2. #12
    Senior Member Hirsch63's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    MBTI
    IS??
    Socionics
    InFj
    Posts
    525

    Default

    Biax or Wolfy would either of you care to comment on lifting for taller guys? Back when I did lift (long ago) my best friend worked out with me and he was 6' 5 inches compared to my 5' 8....so I appeared to gain mass much faster than he did..which bummed him out. Not to mention the leverage issues taller folks have to deal with...

    I train folks for woodworking tasks and I have discovered over the years that tall folks will usually experience some difficulties wih swaying or exaggerated motion during work.

    Thoughts that may aid the tall?
    Patriotism is the last refuge to which a scoundrel clings...Steal a little and they throw you in jail, steal a lot and they make you a king

  3. #13
    Charting a course
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    MBTI
    INFP
    Posts
    3,638

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Hirsch63 View Post
    Biax or Wolfy would either of you care to comment on lifting for taller guys? Back when I did lift (long ago) my best friend worked out with me and he was 6' 5 inches compared to my 5' 8....so I appeared to gain mass much faster than he did..which bummed him out. Not to mention the leverage issues taller folks have to deal with...

    I train folks for woodworking tasks and I have discovered over the years that tall folks will usually experience some difficulties with swaying or exaggerated motion during work.

    Thoughts that may aid the tall?
    When you say woodworking tasks, could you be more specific?

    And when you say train them, are we talking people with developmental/physical disabilities? I ask because it appeals to the Occupational Therapy part of me.

    Off the top of my head, would it be feasible to raise the work-station table level? Or perhaps add some padding so they have a more stable base to work from?

  4. #14

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Hirsch63 View Post
    Thoughts that may aid the tall?
    I used to train with a guy who was lot taller than me.
    As far as leverage issues. He took advantage of his strong hips. So he would do well with wide stance squats and sumo deadlifts. The more weight you can lift with good form the more mass you'll put on so use the lifts with the best leverage.

    I'll think more... I have to go.

  5. #15
    Senior Member Feops's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    MBTI
    INTx
    Posts
    829

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Biaxident View Post
    If you're looking to build muscle you have to give your muscles time to recover. Especially when you start out. You picked good exercises, but it sounds like you are doing them more than once a week. Once a week is more than enough for at least the first year. And you want to work hard enough that you are sore for at least two days afterward.

    And don't overdo the cardio, otherwise all the work to build muscle is wasted.
    Hm, I thought recovery time on most muscles was 24-48 hours? The only exercises I'm repeating are squats and curls, which are every 2-3 days. The other exercises are 4-5 days. I'm not arguing, but I'd like to understand the science behind it.

    They way you phrased "first year", I guess it'll take some time to pull some real results huh? That's fine, I'm liking this tight contoured skin feel I got going on. Also it's a little bit easier to everything, doubly so for my back.

  6. #16

    Default

    Training frequency is recovery dependent.

    It depends on how much volume you do each training session.
    Also training experience matters in that you get better at recruiting muscles as you gain experience. Also of course as you get stronger you use more load.

    So a lot of it comes down to training philosophy.

    I personally think new guys don't know how to recruit the muscles well. Can't really use heavy weights so they can get away with higher frequency of training.

    Even 3-5 times a week. But you have to vary your rep/set scheme and build up to it otherwise you'll burn out.
    If you keep the volume low and training frequency high. It gives you a lot of time to learn training techniques.

    I've always trained on a Upper/Lower split. Each 2 times per week.

  7. #17
    Senior Member Feops's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    MBTI
    INTx
    Posts
    829

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by wolfy View Post
    Training frequency is recovery dependent.

    It depends on how much volume you do each training session.
    Also training experience matters in that you get better at recruiting muscles as you gain experience. Also of course as you get stronger you use more load.

    So a lot of it comes down to training philosophy.

    I personally think new guys don't know how to recruit the muscles well. Can't really use heavy weights so they can get away with higher frequency of training.

    Even 3-5 times a week. But you have to vary your rep/set scheme and build up to it otherwise you'll burn out.
    If you keep the volume low and training frequency high. It gives you a lot of time to learn training techniques.

    I've always trained on a Upper/Lower split. Each 2 times per week.
    I'm doing 3 sets of 5 reps for most of my exercises. Soreness/tension fades in about 24 hours, though I'm uncertain how true of an indicator this is in how rested the muscles are. Certain exercises I'm straining on the last rep, others I still need to tack on additional weight.

    My stance on increasing weights was going to be: do (x) weight for a time, increase by a small amount. If able to do 3x5, good, if not go back to old weight and increase reps to break the pattern and switch things up. Then try the 3x5 with the upped weight again.

    I'm not following any books, but I have done a lot of internet research. There's a lot of opinions floating around and I've tried to mash them into something that seemed straight forward and logical.

  8. #18

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Feops View Post
    I'm doing 3 sets of 5 reps for most of my exercises. Soreness/tension fades in about 24 hours, though I'm uncertain how true of an indicator this is in how rested the muscles are. Certain exercises I'm straining on the last rep, others I still need to tack on additional weight.

    My stance on increasing weights was going to be: do (x) weight for a time, increase by a small amount. If able to do 3x5, good, if not go back to old weight and increase reps to break the pattern and switch things up. Then try the 3x5 with the upped weight again.

    I'm not following any books, but I have done a lot of internet research. There's a lot of opinions floating around and I've tried to mash them into something that seemed straight forward and logical.
    A good rule of thumb is to do a total of 24-50 reps on each exercise you use.
    So for example 3 sets of 8 or 5X5 and all the other different set rep schemes.

    Progression is the name of the game. You can...

    Add reps
    Add weight
    Add sets
    Decrease rest time
    Increase density Increase total volume done in the same time

    It gets difficult to add weight if you don't build the reps.
    The most simple way is
    example
    3x8
    1x9 2x8
    2x9 1x8
    3x9

    and so on until you get to 3x12
    then lower the reps and increase the weight.

  9. #19
    Charting a course
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    MBTI
    INFP
    Posts
    3,638

    Default

    Wolfy has a good regimen there.

    I prefer 6-12 reps per set myself, since that range seems to build muscle mass as well as strength.

    One thing I will add is, perform the exercise correctly, use proper form.

    If you can't perform an exercise with proper form at the weight you're using lower it.


    --------------

    Using cheat reps and partials have a place, just not for someone just starting out.

    It's a pet peeve I have, I see these skinny teens with ten inch upper arms trying to barbell curl half their body weight, by practically bending over backwards to fling the weight up past their waist. Or trying to bench press 135 lbs.(61kg) by arching their backs so far off the bench, the only part touching is their shoulders, then bouncing the bar off their chest so hard it leaves a raised bruise.

    I usually get their attention and try to explain using proper form. But 90% of the time they say "okay" and go back to doing it the wrong way. They seldom come back after a week or so.

    I watched one kid try to bench 225lbs(102kg) with two of his friends as spotters. I just finished my set, and looked over in time to see the twit tell his friends to let go with the weight fully extended, his arms immediately gave out, and he literally cracked his sternum when the bar hit it, then smashed his nose as he tried to roll the bar off himself. His spotters just stood there for a minute trying to figure out what to do. The guy behind the desk called 911, and they had the ambulance take him to the E.R.



  10. #20

    Default

    I usually use 3-8 reps myself. I really like 8 especially for upperbody. I almost never go over 5 on the deadlifts. I prefer to do low reps and lots of sets mostly triples.

Similar Threads

  1. [MBTItm] The haiku thread...
    By anii in forum The NF Idyllic (ENFP, INFP, ENFJ, INFJ)
    Replies: 33
    Last Post: 01-22-2017, 11:03 PM
  2. The Beer Thread
    By Noel in forum The Bonfire
    Replies: 309
    Last Post: 02-03-2010, 12:07 PM
  3. The GHOST thread
    By swordpath in forum The Bonfire
    Replies: 14
    Last Post: 03-14-2008, 08:47 AM
  4. The Hundredth Thread
    By Rajah in forum The Bonfire
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 04-24-2007, 12:22 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
Single Sign On provided by vBSSO