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  1. #1
    Senior Member Sahara's Avatar
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    Default The Caveman Diet

    The stone age diet: Why I eat like a caveman - Independent Online Edition > Health


    One of the leading researchers in the field of Paleolithic eating and fitness is Loren Cordain, a professor in the health and exercise department of Colorado State University. He makes no bones about it: "The human genetic makeup is identical to that of Stone Agers. Those people were optimally adapted to the types of foods they could gather or hunt, and there's no evidence to suggest that modern humans are any different," he says.

    According to Cordain, our modern diet, with its emphasis on refined cereals, sugars, vegetable oils and dairy products, was introduced in the "wink of an eye", with serious ramifications for our health. "The changes that have occurred in the Western diet are far too rapid. Our genes have been stable, but our diet has not."

    In his book The Paleo Diet (Wiley), Cordain argues that the rot set in with the Neolithic (agricultural) revolution some 10,000 years ago. As farming took over the world, bringing with it new foods such as bread and dairy products, so our health and fitness declined. We got fatter, and shorter. Come the Industrial Revolution, things got even worse. "Neolithic, industrial-era and modern-era foods... underlie virtually all the chronic diseases of civilisation: coronary heart disease, hypertension, type-2 diabetes, gout, obesity, acne and breast, colon and prostate cancer," Cordain says.
    The stone age diet: what to eat

    * Rule of thumb: If you can't gather it from a bush or tree, or spear it, it's probably best not to eat it.

    * What you can eat: Lean meat and fish. Fresh fruit and vegetables. Eggs. Dried fruit (without added sugar or vegetable oil). Nuts and seeds.

    * What you can't eat: Sugars, grains (no oats, wheat, barley or rye, etc), beans, peanuts (a bean not a nut) and starchy vegetables (such as potatoes). Dairy products.
    What do you guys think?

    I am beginning to get really confused about what is good to eat and what isn't, what with so many conflicting reports, I just don't know what is GOOD food anymore.

    I have this love hate relationship with food, more hate than love, I want to eat healthy and I have already found that breads, pasta and dairy make me feel really lethargic.

    So I guess my question here is, is this one a good diet choice or not?
    "No one can be free of the chains that surround them"

  2. #2
    Pareo cattus Natrushka's Avatar
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    After years of reading, researching and trying different diets or "ways of eating" I've come to the conclusion that what works for someone wont necessarily work for everyone. There are a few things that do seem to be universal, however.

    1. Eat real food. If it comes in a wrapper, cellophane, a box, etc, don't eat it. Do your shopping around the outsides of the grocery store; where the fresh, unprepared food is located.

    2. Eat a lot of green stuff; volume is what signals to your stomach, then your brain, that you're full. The paleo diet has some merit in this regard; if you fill yourself up on the foods listed above that are allowed, most of those foods aren't calorie dense. Three cups of lettuce vs 3 cups of potato chips...

    3. Move. Lift weights, do HIIT - high intensity interval training - i.e, run, for brief spurts, like you're being chased by a lion. Not technically a diet, but a good part of any diet, IMO.

    4. Avoid the foods that don't agree with you. I need to avoid corn, it messes with my water levels. My husband should (but doesn't) avoid gluten, he's got Crohn's. If it makes you feel uggy, then take that as a sign to stay clear. Certain groups of people (ethnicities) handle certain foods better and worse than others. So if you're an Eskimo, eat as close to how your ancestors ate, if you're French eat like... you get the idea.

    5. Get some fish oil, or some fatty fish into you, ASAP. If this stuff does just a third of what the research claims it does it's worth the money.

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  3. #3
    Senior Member Sahara's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Natrushka View Post

    3. Move. Lift weights, do HIIT - high intensity interval training - i.e, run, for brief spurts, like you're being chased by a lion. Not technically a diet, but a good part of any diet, IMO.
    You know, I tried exercising about 6 months ago, not only did I find it difficult (I am so unfit lol) but I also threw up each time, is that normal?


    4. Avoid the foods that don't agree with you. I need to avoid corn, it messes with my water levels. My husband should (but doesn't) avoid gluten, he's got Crohn's. If it makes you feel uggy, then take that as a sign to stay clear. Certain groups of people (ethnicities) handle certain foods better and worse than others. So if you're an Eskimo, eat as close to how your ancestors ate, if you're French eat like... you get the idea.
    If your half and half then can you eat from both you reckon?


    5. Get some fish oil, or some fatty fish into you, ASAP. If this stuff does just a third of what the research claims it does it's worth the money.
    No arguement here, I love fish.
    "No one can be free of the chains that surround them"

  4. #4
    Senior Member ptgatsby's Avatar
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    I hate the argument that just because we were unable to do something before it's bad for us now. The healthiest part of my day comes from the cereal I have in the morning (and yes, I use soy milk). I could eat a couple of bowls of that and have over 3/4s of the nutritional needs met. So much of what is considered serious medical conditions also come from our extended lifespan and less from diet and everything else.

    A balanced diet is important. Eating too much sugar and fat is bad for you. Since this diet is balanced there is nothing wrong with it really... The logic behind it... eh... that's more painful. Natural will generally be better than processed, not because of the process, but the side effects of nutrient loss, filtering and preserving. Eating well is actually pretty simple... but it's pretty hard to do because it is rarely the most convenient option.

    And as Nat says, there are specifics that won't be covered in any diet - allergies and such do play a factor.

  5. #5
    Senior Member Sahara's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ptgatsby View Post
    I hate the argument that just because we were unable to do something before it's bad for us now. The healthiest part of my day comes from the cereal I have in the morning (and yes, I use soy milk). I could eat a couple of bowls of that and have over 3/4s of the nutritional needs met. So much of what is considered serious medical conditions also come from our extended lifespan and less from diet and everything else.

    A balanced diet is important. Eating too much sugar and fat is bad for you. Since this diet is balanced there is nothing wrong with it really... The logic behind it... eh... that's more painful. Natural will generally be better than processed, not because of the process, but the side effects of nutrient loss, filtering and preserving. Eating well is actually pretty simple... but it's pretty hard to do because it is rarely the most convenient option.

    And as Nat says, there are specifics that won't be covered in any diet - allergies and such do play a factor.

    You know I can not actually start my day properly without a bowl of cereal with ice cold milk, I was using rice milk for awhile, as only the sweetened soya was nice, which kind of spoiled my aims of dumping sugar.

    True though, deep down I know what is healthy to eat and what isn't, but day to day life makes it a harder option. Sandwiches on the go, ergo bread, I did try to make bread out of rice flour, but it just doesn't taste as nice.
    "No one can be free of the chains that surround them"

  6. #6
    Pareo cattus Natrushka's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sahara View Post
    You know, I tried exercising about 6 months ago, not only did I find it difficult (I am so unfit lol) but I also threw up each time, is that normal?
    It may be normal for you, it may not

    Chances are you did too much, too soon. Are you healthy? Have you been to a doctor recently and know that there is nothing that would prevent you from exercising? If you know you can, then start small. Walk before you jog (and take this for what it's worth, although it is coming from a former runner - don't run, it's horrible on your feet and knees), jog before you sprint.

    If you do nothing now, then just moving around more is something. Park as far as possible from the store. Take the stairs. Dance to the music on your stereo.

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  7. #7
    Oberon
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    I think that, over time, your body will tell you what it likes. Pay attention to your cravings; pay attention to how different foods make you feel.

    Lately when I'm hungry I've been thinking "meat and fruit...meat and fruit..." and consequently I'll eat a grilled pork chop and an orange, for example. Later on I'll want other things. As long as you don't go nuts on quantity, you should do just fine letting your body be your guide.

  8. #8
    Senior Member 563 740's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sahara View Post
    You know, I tried exercising about 6 months ago, not only did I find it difficult (I am so unfit lol) but I also threw up each time, is that normal?
    Sustained, high intensity exercise can easily make you throw up if you push it too far. I've yakked while bicycling with guys that were in way better shape than I.
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  9. #9
    Senior Member Sahara's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Natrushka View Post
    It may be normal for you, it may not

    Chances are you did too much, too soon. Are you healthy? Have you been to a doctor recently and know that there is nothing that would prevent you from exercising? If you know you can, then start small. Walk before you jog (and take this for what it's worth, although it is coming from a former runner - don't run, it's horrible on your feet and knees), jog before you sprint.

    If you do nothing now, then just moving around more is something. Park as far as possible from the store. Take the stairs. Dance to the music on your stereo.
    No, I didn't go to the doctor, I am going for a check up next week as I booked a gym membership and wanted to be sure where I was at fitness wise. (bottom of the rung lol)



    Quote Originally Posted by oberon67 View Post
    I think that, over time, your body will tell you what it likes. Pay attention to your cravings; pay attention to how different foods make you feel.

    Lately when I'm hungry I've been thinking "meat and fruit...meat and fruit..." and consequently I'll eat a grilled pork chop and an orange, for example. Later on I'll want other things. As long as you don't go nuts on quantity, you should do just fine letting your body be your guide.
    I get those cravings but find it hard to pin down what I want, I was bulimic for so long on and off through my life that now that I eat again (over a year now) I just fear all food lol.

    Quote Originally Posted by 563 740 View Post
    Sustained, high intensity exercise can easily make you throw up if you push it too far. I've yakked while bicycling with guys that were in way better shape than I.
    Ok, that's what it must have been then. I am choosing a more gentle approach this time, I went all out last time, threw up too often and quit.
    "No one can be free of the chains that surround them"

  10. #10
    Senior Member Lateralus's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sahara View Post
    You know I can not actually start my day properly without a bowl of cereal with ice cold milk, I was using rice milk for awhile, as only the sweetened soya was nice, which kind of spoiled my aims of dumping sugar.

    True though, deep down I know what is healthy to eat and what isn't, but day to day life makes it a harder option. Sandwiches on the go, ergo bread, I did try to make bread out of rice flour, but it just doesn't taste as nice.
    You don't even necessarily need to use rice flour. Homemade bread is better for you than the typical storebought stuff. You're not loading your bread with preservatives or extra sugar.
    "We grow up thinking that beliefs are something to be proud of, but they're really nothing but opinions one refuses to reconsider. Beliefs are easy. The stronger your beliefs are, the less open you are to growth and wisdom, because "strength of belief" is only the intensity with which you resist questioning yourself. As soon as you are proud of a belief, as soon as you think it adds something to who you are, then you've made it a part of your ego."

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