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  1. #11
    Senior Member kuranes's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by edcoaching View Post
    One of my favorite workshop exercises is dividing the group into quadrants and giving everyone the same creativity assignment--ES, EN, IS, IN, the 4 learning styles I use with teachers and students.

    The groups are blown away by the incredibly different, yet all creative results. There's more than one form of creativity but because of what is honored, lots of people don't even know they're creative...
    Expand on this, if you will. I think I know what you mean, in general, but it would be useful for the membership to see/read specific examples.

    I know that in the art world many newcomers to it say that they cannot create art, when what they mean is that they cannot draw something that aspires to a photographic ideal of fidelity to detail, or that they would simply not want to learn such skills. Yet they can maybe do something which is highly expressive anyway, in part by its very simplicity. One might explain to such a person that they don't have to strive for photographic realism, as we have cameras for that.

    A friend of mine is a teacher and she has told me about teaching people how to learn as well as teaching them subjects that they would apply such learning skills towards. Some teachers only concentrate on the latter.
    "The people can always be brought to the bidding of the leaders. That is easy. All you have to do is tell them that they are being attacked and denounce the peacemakers for lack of patriotism, and exposing the country to danger. It works the same in any country."
    Reichsfuhrer Herman Goering at the Nuremburg trials.

  2. #12
    Senior Member edcoaching's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by entropie View Post
    One of your favourite workshop excersises .. ?! haha , you ARE giving me the creeps
    Hey, they really like doing it
    edcoaching

  3. #13
    violaine
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    Quote Originally Posted by kuranes View Post

    Yes, this is an interesting question, too. Which countries seem to value artists enough to be supportive of the "seedlings" ( fledgling artists that must be cultivated to an extent so as to always have some new voices in development ) ??

    In America, I often hear that it is Europe that values its artists. I just read a post the other day from a Swede ( I forget who it was ) who said that he felt his country tended on the whole to give artists the cold shoulder. There are no countries which accept all "artists" with outstretched arms and no caveats, of course; but there are some ( aren't there ? ) that seem to put a higher priority on Art. How is it in Europe ? Do you Europeans hear ( conversely ) that it is, in fact, American audiences that one should try to get access to ?

    One hears vaguely about France supporting jazz musicians that the USA had marginalized. That artists in Russia risked their very lives to get work out during the colder days there. What other countries fit this model ? Is it still true about France ?
    I'm not sure about actual programs elsewhere....

    I grew up somewhere with universal health care... I didn't understand before living in the US how much more risky it is to pursue certain creative avenues as a way to make a living here, purely because of the health care system. A lot of creative work is on a freelance basis. Until you are good enough at what you're doing (which takes time) it's going to be hard to pay for your own health insurance. I know that having good health insurance is the only reason some of my friends are stuck in jobs they hate instead of trying for what they really want. And so they will never develop their talent.

    It could be said though that it means the artists/creative types who do make it here are really worthy. (Of course there are those who are career creatives or the ones who might be useless but have solid financial support.) I don't condemn it by any means, but I do find it very interesting...

  4. #14
    Senior Member edcoaching's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by sanveane View Post
    I'm not sure about actual programs elsewhere....

    I grew up somewhere with universal health care... I didn't understand before living in the US, how much more risky it is to pursue certain creative avenues as a way to make a living purely because of the health care system here. A lot of creative work is on a freelance basis. Until you are good enough at what you're doing (which takes time) it's going to be hard to pay for your own health insurance. I know that having good health insurance is the only reason some of my friends are stuck in jobs they hate instead of trying for what they really want. And so they will never develop their talent.

    It could be said though that it means the artists/creative types who do make it here are really worthy. (Of course there are those who are career creatives or the ones who might be useless but have solid financial support.) I don't condemn it by any means, but I do find it very interesting...
    Really true about the insurance, etc. So many parents are desperate to do the "right thing" and steer their kids into safe jobs...
    edcoaching

  5. #15
    violaine
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    ^Yeah, I really do understand it now. I think it must be really difficult to know what to do as a parent, the creative way is not assured, it's a big risk here until you get to a certain level...

  6. #16
    & Badger, Ratty and Toad Mole's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by kuranes View Post
    What about creativity ? Is there more than one kind of creativity ? Do non-creatives resent creatives ?
    Once we become visible, we become something else.

    Everyone and their dog now is creative or wants to be creative.

    So creativity is over.

    But worse, creativity is seen as good, so even the meretricious are creative - and particularly the meretricious.

    Ya wanna be good - be creative.

    But nature abhors a vacuum, so what rushes in to fill the space left by creative?

    It must be something not taken seriously. It must be something that is only half seen and misinterpreted.

    It must be something like God - it must be someone who is omnipresent.

    But it must be someone disparaged - someone we turn our noses up at. But someone who we can't keep our eyes off.

    It can be no one else than Paris Hilton.

    Everyone knows Paris is not creative - and everyone knows Paris.

    And the meretricious avoid Paris like the plague.

    If you look at Paris full on, she is invisible. But if you look at her out of the corner of your eye, she is present.

    She is a present to all of us, and her present is simply presence.

    Yes, dear Reader, presence has replaced creativity while you were asleep.

    Yes, it is unfair. You try so hard to be good - and what happens - the world changes around you while you were asleep - the world changes behind your back - you've been short-changed, baby - too late: it's now too late!

    What was once good is now not good; and what is bad is - what horror - now good!

    Oh what is a good girl and boy to do?

  7. #17
    Senior Member edcoaching's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by kuranes View Post
    Expand on this, if you will. I think I know what you mean, in general, but it would be useful for the membership to see/read specific examples.

    I know that in the art world many newcomers to it say that they cannot create art, when what they mean is that they cannot draw something that aspires to a photographic ideal of fidelity to detail, or that they would simply not want to learn such skills. Yet they can maybe do something which is highly expressive anyway, in part by its very simplicity. One might explain to such a person that they don't have to strive for photographic realism, as we have cameras for that.

    A friend of mine is a teacher and she has told me about teaching people how to learn as well as teaching them subjects that they would apply such learning skills towards. Some teachers only concentrate on the latter.
    Okay...remember this is part of a much longer workshop experience aimed at teambuilding...

    Each group gets a bag filled with the kinds of things you'd find in a junk drawer, every bag has the same objects. Golf balls, Mardi Gras beads, a votive candle, lipstick, a handwritten note, etc. Purposely as unrelated as can be. They're told, "This is evidence from a crime scene. Your job is to tell the group who done it, what they did, and their motive." I say they can do a story board, skit, or just summarize it, whatever they want.

    IS--They come up with a story like that almost really could have happened like jealousy at a country club and act it out like it's Dragnet. Understated funny

    ES--Theirs is somewhat realistic but there's a slapstick element that brings down the house. Sound effects, etc.

    EN--Their plots have talking mice escaping in hot air balloons powered by a votive candle, and so many ideas that there are usually moments when someone has no idea how to follow what their team mate just did...

    IN--One person speaks for the group, usually sitting down, spinning a tale that somehow connects every item in a Hitchhiker's Guide style of prose.

    "Beginners" to type can articulate the differences and how comfortable/creative they were able to be when working with others who took similar approaches...
    edcoaching

  8. #18
    Senior Member edcoaching's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by sanveane View Post
    ^Yeah, I really do understand it now. I think it must be really difficult to know what to do as a parent, the creative way is not assured, it's a big risk here until you get to a certain level...
    As someone with a son who is double-majoring in English and Philosophy, all I can say is he's lucky his mom was an English major and doing just fine, thank you...
    edcoaching

  9. #19

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    This article by Marci Segal on Adaptive Creativity and Innovative Creativity is very interesting. I like how she ties Kirtons theory of two types in with MBTI.
    This article by Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi is not about two types of creativity but is an interesting article on Ten paradoxical traits of the creative personality.

  10. #20
    Senior Member edcoaching's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by wolfy View Post
    This article by Marci Segal on Adaptive Creativity and Innovative Creativity is very interesting. I like how she ties Kirtons theory of two types in with MBTI.
    This article by Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi is not about two types of creativity but is an interesting article on Ten paradoxical traits of the creative personality.
    Marci keynoted at one of the type conferences and got us into trios where we had to "sell products" to each other. No warning--she'd announce the topic and you had to start your sales pitch right away. Mine was selling orthodontia work for centipedes. Another had something to do with elephants. The whole room had a blast. Her preferences are ISTP. If you EVER have a chance to hear her, jump on it. Her site is
    CreativityLand :: content :: main
    edcoaching

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