User Tag List

First 123 Last

Results 11 to 20 of 21

  1. #11
    Senior Member LostInNerSpace's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    MBTI
    INTP
    Posts
    1,027

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by ThatGirl View Post
    I am saying this because I think there would be a strong correlation between certain types an certain disorders.


    Come on you have never read a type and thought that would be the most likely to have:

    Obsessive Compulisve behavior,
    Depression,
    Anxiety
    Sociopathic
    schizo


    MBTI helps to say you are but because of and it is ok, possibly relieving fear and giving purpose
    Yes, I have thought about that. I think it could help with mild cases of each, except for schizophrenia which I'm pretty sure is a pathological condition; some kind of physical brain defect. It would also depend on the individual.

  2. #12
    Senior Member mlittrell's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    MBTI
    ENFP
    Enneagram
    9w1
    Posts
    1,387

    Default

    So what if ISTJs tend to have schizophrenia more...great, he/she has schizophrenia. Sure you can use MBTI as cognitive therapy but personally, I don't see it doing too much, if anything at all. The way doctors and such treat psychosis is actually kind of frightening.
    "Honest differences are often a healthy sign of progress. "

    "You must not lose faith in humanity. Humanity is an ocean; if a few drops of the ocean are dirty, the ocean does not become dirty."

    "An eye for an eye makes the whole world blind."

    Mahatma Gandhi

    Enneagram: 9w1

  3. #13
    Senior Member edcoaching's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    MBTI
    INFJ
    Enneagram
    7
    Posts
    752

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by mlittrell View Post
    So what if ISTJs tend to have schizophrenia more...great, he/she has schizophrenia. Sure you can use MBTI as cognitive therapy but personally, I don't see it doing too much, if anything at all. The way doctors and such treat psychosis is actually kind of frightening.
    Using type theory and using assessments are two different things. Most type assessments only work on normal people and were designed that way, so you aren't going to get accurate results from any instrument.

    On the other hand, Jung used type clinically. That's where it came from --different pathways for therapy got different types unstuck.

    A realtime, effective use of type. A colleague of mine in Canada runs a preschool for children of autism. While any type can be autistic, she thinks about it as an exaggerated form of ISTJ--inability to relate to the external world, obsessions on physical objects, inability to put oneself into the shoes of others, and lack of openness. Note that this is total lack of ENFP, which is not how ISTJ appears in normal people.

    The parents she works with love this lens--it's easier for them to relate to since they can relate through the type framework better than through "Your child is broken.."

    With wonderful results, the preschool uses techniques and structures that Quenk and others found effective in reducing stress in ISTJs.
    edcoaching

  4. #14
    Senior Member Anja's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2008
    MBTI
    INFP
    Posts
    2,967

    Default

    I think it's useful for anyone with a thought disorder to be able to recognize personal pattern and cause and effect. So the MBTI could be one useful model in that direction. Whether they are able to apply those things to their lives depends on multiple factors - appropriate medication used appropriately, the skill of the assesor and therapist, and the motivation of the patient.

    Get those three things in place and any number of models could theoretically work.

    Recognition of self-defeating patterns would be the key.
    "No ray of sunshine is ever lost, but the green which it awakes into existence needs time to sprout, and it is not always granted to the sower to see the harvest. All work that is worth anything is done in faith." - Albert Schweitzer

  5. #15
    Senior Member LostInNerSpace's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    MBTI
    INTP
    Posts
    1,027

    Default

    As usual a veered off topic a little with my answer, I should be more clear. I did not mean to say MBTI would help people. It's more that posting and talking about problems would help. MBTI might help identify people who tend to be more susceptible, but I don't see how that helps.

  6. #16
    Minister of Propagandhi ajblaise's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    MBTI
    INTP
    Posts
    7,917

    Default

    hmmm, I can only see this MBTI therapy as helpful if the goal is to help people get rid of their insecurities and realize their potential to one day become an INTP.

  7. #17
    Senior Member INTJMom's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    MBTI
    INTJ
    Posts
    5,350

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by edcoaching View Post
    ...
    A realtime, effective use of type. A colleague of mine in Canada runs a preschool for children of autism. While any type can be autistic, she thinks about it as an exaggerated form of ISTJ--inability to relate to the external world, obsessions on physical objects, inability to put oneself into the shoes of others, and lack of openness. Note that this is total lack of ENFP, which is not how ISTJ appears in normal people.

    The parents she works with love this lens--it's easier for them to relate to since they can relate through the type framework better than through "Your child is broken.."

    With wonderful results, the preschool uses techniques and structures that Quenk and others found effective in reducing stress in ISTJs.
    Wow! That is really awesome!! Yay!

  8. #18
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    MBTI
    ISTJ
    Posts
    109

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by edcoaching View Post
    Using type theory and using assessments are two different things. Most type assessments only work on normal people and were designed that way, so you aren't going to get accurate results from any instrument.

    On the other hand, Jung used type clinically. That's where it came from --different pathways for therapy got different types unstuck.

    A realtime, effective use of type. A colleague of mine in Canada runs a preschool for children of autism. While any type can be autistic, she thinks about it as an exaggerated form of ISTJ--inability to relate to the external world, obsessions on physical objects, inability to put oneself into the shoes of others, and lack of openness. Note that this is total lack of ENFP, which is not how ISTJ appears in normal people.

    The parents she works with love this lens--it's easier for them to relate to since they can relate through the type framework better than through "Your child is broken.."

    With wonderful results, the preschool uses techniques and structures that Quenk and others found effective in reducing stress in ISTJs.
    The signature I use is driectly from the back of the report cards my parents had to endure every ten weeks or so. My grades were above average, but "...he doesn't want to play with anyone. He is always by himself..."

    I am so thankful I grew up when I did, and not in the "enlightened" era where any difference fromt he norm gets its own label (and quite possibly its own perscription). Was I autstic? Socialy avoidant? Did I need to be "fixed?"

    All I can say is based on where I am now - happy and living comfortably.

    So with regard to the OP, I feel that anything that can be used to help people without condemning them to live in a medicated haze during their early years can't be all bad. Are there needs for medication? Are there needs for medical intervention? Of course. But as long as one doesn't rely on just one opinion and gathers facts as best they can before making a decision regarding such matters I don't see the harm.
    ...doesn't work or play well with others...

  9. #19
    Banned
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    MBTI
    type
    Posts
    9,100

    Default

    For people with unambiguous mental illness, no.

    For basically normal folk: It's effective at demonstrating we're not all the same, and we don't have to be.

  10. #20
    Senior Member mlittrell's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    MBTI
    ENFP
    Enneagram
    9w1
    Posts
    1,387

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Jack Flak View Post
    For people with unambiguous mental illness, no.

    For basically normal folk: It's effective at demonstrating we're not all the same, and we don't have to be.
    amen

    eric braverman is making nice strides as far as connecting psychosis with neurotransmitters. that is where myers briggs can be helpful. using it directly...ehh not so much
    "Honest differences are often a healthy sign of progress. "

    "You must not lose faith in humanity. Humanity is an ocean; if a few drops of the ocean are dirty, the ocean does not become dirty."

    "An eye for an eye makes the whole world blind."

    Mahatma Gandhi

    Enneagram: 9w1

Similar Threads

  1. MBTI and Cognitive Functions
    By paradox fox in forum Myers-Briggs and Jungian Cognitive Functions
    Replies: 20
    Last Post: 03-16-2010, 05:45 PM
  2. Using MBTI as a way... FFUUUUUU
    By attetude in forum Myers-Briggs and Jungian Cognitive Functions
    Replies: 68
    Last Post: 08-16-2009, 09:45 PM
  3. MBTI as a tool
    By Ardea in forum Myers-Briggs and Jungian Cognitive Functions
    Replies: 22
    Last Post: 04-28-2009, 06:08 PM
  4. MBTI as a cure.
    By EcK in forum General Psychology
    Replies: 56
    Last Post: 02-14-2009, 04:39 PM
  5. MBTI and Cognitive Functions
    By RansomedbyFire in forum Myers-Briggs and Jungian Cognitive Functions
    Replies: 7
    Last Post: 09-10-2007, 06:52 AM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
Single Sign On provided by vBSSO