User Tag List

Results 1 to 4 of 4

  1. #1
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2014
    Posts
    1,628

    Default I Can't Lucid Dream.

    So lately I've been recording the contents of my dreams, or whatever I remember, in the hopes that I'll eventually see patterns emerging within my dreams and I'll go lucid, or control events as they happen.



    I remember a couple times in dreams when I died, I became an omnipotent god and gained complete creative control of everything in the dream for just a few seconds (compared to the rest of the dream's duration as dreams in themselves last only a few short seconds) before awakening.
    Yes, the dreams in which I'm dying, I become God. Like that stupid song but the other way.


    Recently I had a dream where I was aware I was dreaming, but I was dreading waking up because I had to do some project the day after. In the dream, I was in my house, and I was watching some old Austrian WWI propaganda films (one was black-and-white, the other was a cartoon allegory involving Pinocchio). I didn't want to go downstairs because I'd wake up and have to do the work, but I went anyway because I was bored. So at this point I'd awoken from a dream within this dream, and it seemed real, probably because I was lacking oxygen, but I soon realized this was also a dream state. Realizing this, I tried to focus and make Sandy Cheeks appear in front of me -- but I couldn't. I couldn't change the reality of a dream-state of which I was aware. I could visualize how Sandy would look -- in fact, I think I might have created her on a lower dream state than the one I was in -- but I couldn't create a "physical" form of her in my "conscious" level of dream-reality.


    I'm wondering if there's any reason for this, what might be stopping me, and if you have any input or similar experiences.

  2. #2
    failure to thrive AphroditeGoneAwry's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    MBTI
    INfj
    Enneagram
    451 sx/so
    Socionics
    ENFj Ni
    Posts
    5,651

    Default

    Just fyi: Sounds like some sort of depersonalization, which can happen with dissociation.

    Dissociative disorders | Mind, the mental health charity - help for mental health problems :

    The different types of dissociation
    There are five types of dissociation:

    Amnesia
    This is when you can’t remember incidents or experiences that happened at a particular time, or when you can’t remember important personal information.

    Depersonalisation
    A feeling that your body is unreal, changing or dissolving. It also includes out-of-body experiences, such as seeing yourself as if watching a movie.

    Derealisation
    The world around you seems unreal. You may see objects changing in shape, size or colour, or you may feel that other people are robots.

    Identity confusion
    Feeling uncertain about who you are. You may feel as if there is a struggle within to define yourself.

    Identity alteration
    This is when there is a shift in your role or identity that changes your behaviour in ways that others could notice. For instance, you may be very different at work from when you are at home.

    What are the different types of dissociative disorder?
    Occasional, mild episodes of dissociation are part of ordinary, everyday life. Sometimes – at the time of a one-off trauma or during the prolonged ‘identity confusion’ of adolescence, for instance – more severe episodes are quite natural.

    Dissociative disorders occur when you have continuing and repeated episodes of dissociation. These usually cause what many people describe as ‘internal chaos’, and may interfere with your work, school, social, or home life. However, you may be someone who appears to be functioning well, and this may hide the distress you are experiencing.

    Dissociative amnesia
    This is when you can’t remember significant personal information or particular periods of time, which can’t be explained by ordinary forgetfulness. You may also experience mild to moderate depersonalisation, derealisation and identity confusion.

    I didn’t know I had other personalities at first because I wouldn’t remember them taking over – usually people closest to you are the first to know.
    Depersonalisation disorder
    You will have strong feelings of detachment from your own body or feel that your body is unreal. You may also experience mild to moderate derealisation and mild identity confusion.

    Dissociative fugue
    You may travel to a new location during a temporary loss of identity. You may then assume a different identity and a new life. Usually this ‘fugue’ will last for a few days, but it can last longer. To people who don’t know you, your behaviour may appear normal.

    When your memory of your identity returns, you may have a range of different feelings about what you did while in the fugue, such as depression, guilt, shame, fear and/or confusion. If you experience dissociative fugue, you are likely to have experienced severe amnesia, with moderate to severe identity confusion and often
    identity alteration.

    Dissociative identity disorder (DID)
    This is the most complex dissociative disorder. It is also known as multiple personality disorder (MPD). This has led some to see it as a personality disorder, although it is not. The defining feature is severe change in identity.

    I’d look in the mirror and it would be a different face. I was chaotic and unsettled.

    If you experience DID, you may experience the shifts of identity as separate personalities. Each identity may be in control of your behaviour and thoughts at different times. Each has a distinctive pattern of thinking and relating to the world. If you also have very severe amnesia, it may mean that one identity may have no awareness of what happens when another identity is in control. The amnesia can be one-way or two-way. Identity confusion is usually moderate to severe. DID also includes severe depersonalisation and derealisation.

    Dissociative disorder not otherwise specified (DDNOS)
    Each of the five types of dissociative response (see What are the different types of dissociative disorder?) may occur, but the pattern of mix and severity does not fit any of the other dissociative disorders listed above.

    Additional problems
    If you have a dissociative disorder, you may experience other problems too, e.g. depression, mood swings, anxiety and panic attacks, suicidal thoughts and feelings, self-harm, headaches, hearing voices, sleep disorders, phobias, alcohol and drug abuse, eating disorders, obsessive-compulsive behaviour and various physical health problems.

    These may be directly connected with the dissociative problem, or could mean that you also have a non-dissociative disorder. In DID, some problems may only emerge when a particular identity has control of your behaviour, thoughts and feelings.

    What are the effects of a dissociative disorder?
    Dissociation can affect your perception, thinking, feeling, behaviour, body and memory. If you experience a dissociative disorder you may have to cope with many challenges in life. The impact of dissociation varies from person to person and may change over time. How well a person appears to be coping is not a good way of telling how severely affected they are.

    The effects of dissociative disorder may include:

    gaps in your memory
    finding yourself in a strange place without knowing how you got there
    out-of-body experiences
    loss of feeling in parts of your body
    distorted views of your body
    forgetting important personal information
    being unable to recognise your image in a mirror
    a sense of detachment from your emotions
    the impression of watching a movie of yourself
    feelings of being unreal
    internal voices and dialogue
    feeling detached from the world
    forgetting appointments
    feeling that a customary environment is unfamiliar
    a sense that what is happening is unreal
    forgetting a talent or learned skill
    a sense that people you know are strangers
    a perception of objects changing shape, colour or size
    feeling you don’t know who you are
    acting like different people, including child-like behaviour
    being unsure of the boundaries between yourself and others
    feeling like a stranger to yourself
    being confused about your sexuality or gender
    feeling like there are different people inside you
    referring to yourself as ‘we’
    being told by others that you have behaved out of character
    finding items in your possession that you don’t remember buying or receiving
    writing in different handwriting
    having knowledge of a subject you don’t recall studying.
    Ni/Ti/Fe/Si
    4w5 5w4 1w9
    ~Torah observant, Christ inspired~
    Life Path 11

    The more one loves God, the more it is that having nothing in the world means everything, and the less one loves God, the more it is that having everything in the world means nothing.

    Do not resist an evil person, but to him who strikes you on the one cheek, offer also the other. ~Matthew 5:39

    songofmary.wordpress.com


  3. #3
    The Dark Lord The Wailing Specter's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2013
    MBTI
    ENFP
    Enneagram
    6w7 sp/so
    Socionics
    ENFP Ne
    Posts
    3,267

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Nihilogen View Post
    So lately I've been recording the contents of my dreams, or whatever I remember, in the hopes that I'll eventually see patterns emerging within my dreams and I'll go lucid, or control events as they happen.



    I remember a couple times in dreams when I died, I became an omnipotent god and gained complete creative control of everything in the dream for just a few seconds (compared to the rest of the dream's duration as dreams in themselves last only a few short seconds) before awakening.
    Yes, the dreams in which I'm dying, I become God. Like that stupid song but the other way.


    Recently I had a dream where I was aware I was dreaming, but I was dreading waking up because I had to do some project the day after. In the dream, I was in my house, and I was watching some old Austrian WWI propaganda films (one was black-and-white, the other was a cartoon allegory involving Pinocchio). I didn't want to go downstairs because I'd wake up and have to do the work, but I went anyway because I was bored. So at this point I'd awoken from a dream within this dream, and it seemed real, probably because I was lacking oxygen, but I soon realized this was also a dream state. Realizing this, I tried to focus and make Sandy Cheeks appear in front of me -- but I couldn't. I couldn't change the reality of a dream-state of which I was aware. I could visualize how Sandy would look -- in fact, I think I might have created her on a lower dream state than the one I was in -- but I couldn't create a "physical" form of her in my "conscious" level of dream-reality.


    I'm wondering if there's any reason for this, what might be stopping me, and if you have any input or similar experiences.
    I'm going through a dry spell right now, but I've had some pretty intense ones. The trick is using every method available at once persistently. I joined LD4all for that purpose. When I got busy, I fell out of practice though and Bye-Bye LD.
    Enneagram: 6w7 (phobic) > 2w1 > 9w1
    Alignment: Chaotic Neutral
    Holland Code: AIS
    Date of Birth: March 15, 1996
    Gender: Male
    Political Stance: Libertarian Liberal (Arizona School/Strong BHL)
    ATHEIST UNITARIAN UNIVERSALIST HUMANIST
    and
    SCIENCE ENTHUSIAST


    I say this as a reminder to myself, but this goes for everyone:

    You can achieve anything you set your mind to, and you are limited only by how dedicated you are to succeed!

    -Magic Qwan

  4. #4
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2014
    Posts
    686

    Default

    Practice deep states of consciousness in meditation first. You're ability to manipulate a visual world during waking hours will translate to the dream state.

Similar Threads

  1. Lucid Dream Journal
    By The Wailing Specter in forum General Psychology
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 10-13-2014, 10:51 PM
  2. Lucid dreaming
    By clueless in forum General Psychology
    Replies: 191
    Last Post: 01-22-2014, 05:34 AM
  3. Lucid dreams and type
    By Kurt.Is.God in forum General Psychology
    Replies: 43
    Last Post: 03-26-2012, 06:12 AM
  4. Lucid Dreaming and Dream Control
    By JoSunshine in forum General Psychology
    Replies: 16
    Last Post: 01-11-2011, 09:56 PM
  5. Lucid dreaming without control
    By Sahara in forum The Bonfire
    Replies: 14
    Last Post: 10-02-2007, 09:07 AM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
Single Sign On provided by vBSSO