User Tag List

First 123 Last

Results 11 to 20 of 21

  1. #11
    Senior Member prplchknz's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    MBTI
    yupp
    Posts
    29,776

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by five sounds View Post
    you probably do. code switching is just about dialect, and my guess is you use more than one based on who you're interacting with. with my sisters we have a kinda way of talking that we fall into together, i speak differently with my old friends than people who i'm just meeting, i have a way of speaking when i'm interacting with kids, i have a professional tone that i use at work or when doing other business-y things, etc.
    no i pretty much talk the same in all situations except when you make me angry then i get teary and more shouty but my dialect stays the same.
    In no likes experiment.

    that is all

    i dunno what else to say so
    Likes five sounds liked this post

  2. #12
    hypersane Hive's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Posts
    1,005

    Default

    I hate this so much. I don't know why. It happens often that Swedes use English words or whole sentences when they easily could've expressed the same thing in Swedish, which annoys me greatly. It could be because I value eloquence, and switching simple Swedish words for their English equivalent feels like a debasement. Like repairing the cracks in a gold vase with copper.

    So no, I don't code switch, and in fact make it a point not to.
    I FEEL ALRIGHT

  3. #13
    Senior Member robowolf's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2013
    MBTI
    FREE
    Posts
    136

    Default

    I don't know why but where I live it's becoming increasingly common to switch between English and Italian, not so much while speaking as when writing on social media. It must have something to do with the the fact that a lot of people are beginning to watch non dubbed movies/tv shows.

    Some find it annoying, mainly because there are many who can't even speak their own language properly, so at times they unintentionally rape two different grammars in one sentence. I, as a grammar nazi, find it entertaining.

  4. #14
    cool cat Freesia's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2013
    MBTI
    Meow
    Enneagram
    :0) so/sp
    Socionics
    EII Ne
    Posts
    252

    Default

    Yes, but not in the sense of switching between two different languages (because I only speak one language). It's more like switching between two different dialects, in a way. There's a distinction "public" and "private" speech, with public being less accented and more regimented and private being more relaxed, casual, and accented.

    "Be clearly aware of the stars and infinity on high.
    Then life seems almost enchanted after all."
    - Vincent van Gogh






    johari/nohari

    infp 4w5 ?w? 9w? so=sp>sx

  5. #15
    Member Senkrad's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    MBTI
    FiTe
    Enneagram
    YwX sx/sp
    Posts
    66

    Default

    Yes, I code-switch between different languages since I am trilingual, although I have to admit that I am awful at speaking my mother tongue but I generally understand it spoken without any difficulties. However, I only code-switch with people that knows two out of the three languages and usually it is only to substitute words I can't come up with in the language I started the sentence with or if the word do not really exist in the "main" language.
    I usually do not have any problem with people code-switching, but some people do it just to be cool or hip, like throwing in # YOLO or SWAG all over the place. That bothers me because it does not sound natural at all. I do not want any bling-bling in my perfectly normal conversation.
    Last edited by Senkrad; 01-15-2015 at 11:26 AM. Reason: Something bothered me.
    I'm a green bean killing machine.

  6. #16
    filling some space UnitOfPopulation's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    MBTI
    ENTJ
    Posts
    3,272

    Default

    I dont accidently speak in any language, ever.

    But I do forget which language I held a conversation in.

    Or which language I read a book in.

    I do remember which language I wrote in, though.
    [SIGPIC][/SIGPIC]

  7. #17
    this is my winter song EJCC's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    MBTI
    ESTJ
    Enneagram
    173 so/sx
    Posts
    18,433

    Default

    In the more traditional sense, I code-switch big time whenever I'm around people who I took Arabic classes with.

    In the less traditional sense -- i.e. maybe this doesn't count as code-switching? -- I often switch in and out of Business Jargon and academia jargon. It can be embarrassing both at work and with friends. (For a small example, see above: using "more traditional sense" and "big time" in the same sentence. I do this sort of thing so often that it's probably a hallmark of my writing style at this point.)

    Also, levels of swears.
    ~ g e t f e s t i v e ! ~


    EJCC: "The Big Questions in my life right now: 1) What am I willing to live with? 2) What do I have to live with? 3) What can I change for the better?"
    Coriolis: "Is that the ESTJ Serenity Prayer?"



    ESTJ - LSE - ESTj (mbti/socionics)
    1w2/7w6/3w4 so/sx (enneagram)
    want to ask me something? go for it!

  8. #18
    Member Senkrad's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    MBTI
    FiTe
    Enneagram
    YwX sx/sp
    Posts
    66

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by EJCC View Post
    In the less traditional sense -- i.e. maybe this doesn't count as code-switching? -- I often switch in and out of Business Jargon and academia jargon. It can be embarrassing both at work and with friends. (For a small example, see above: using "more traditional sense" and "big time" in the same sentence. I do this sort of thing so often that it's probably a hallmark of my writing style at this point.)
    In sociolinguistics that is refered to as style-switching. Usually the switch in style depends on what, who, where and why the speaker is talking with another person or a group. But of course, sometimes it can be hard not to fall into professional jargon if the topic ends up being something that you are really interested in.
    I'm a green bean killing machine.
    Likes EJCC liked this post

  9. #19
    Senior Member Yaru's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2014
    MBTI
    INFP
    Enneagram
    4w5
    Posts
    292

    Default

    Yeah. All the time. Mostly with people that speak the same languages ad I do.
    But lately I realized that I keep making the same mistakes. Like I say the Italian ''Vengo'' instead of the Spanish ''Voy''
    And I keep using the word ''resist'' in the wrong way since in Italian and Spanish it means both resist and endure.
    I feel mostly comfortable with people who talk more than 1 language, there are too many limits in conversation if they only know one.
    It also happened that I heard Brazilians talk in Italian, and because of their South American accent I unconsciously began to talk in Spanish.They couldn't understand me, but I just couldn't talk Italian with them.

    Personality traits: a summary by Yar'Chun
    Introverted - Independent bitch
    Extraverted - Weak
    Intuitive - Creative 4th dimension spacelord
    Sensing - Dumb
    Feeling - Such confused wow
    Thinking - Smart
    Judjing - Nel mio intimo c'è Chilly
    Perceiving - Oooh butterflies


  10. #20
    Senior Member danseen's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2013
    MBTI
    INTP
    Posts
    784

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Rail Tracer View Post
    In a more narrow linguistic definition, Code-Switching means the intermixing of at least two languages when speaking or writing. It's most common between people who know two+ languages or is learning another language. Some examples including:

    Speaking Spanish in one sentence, and then switching back to English in another sentence (with or without thought)

    Speaking French but inserting a few Spanish words (and vice versa) with people who know how to speak both French and Spanish. A crude example would be "Hola! Je m'appelle Rail Tracer", or "Bonjour! Me llamo Rail Tracer." To a person who can speak both Spanish and French, it'll be understandable (people that try not to intermix the two languages will just think it's weird)

    Speaking Chinese but inserting an English word by accident without realizing that it was an English word you were using (that has not gone through the process of loan-words, like how Sushi or Dim-Sum has become a common English word.) An example: "我在找一 bowl." The characters used in the majority of the sentence is said in Chinese, but the person decided to use bowl instead of 碗 (which is a bowl in Chinese.) Roughly (I think) translate to "I am looking for a bowl."

    Youtube Example:



    Yes, it is particularly common with me because I am bilingual (but still trying to get better at my lesser used language.) Sometimes I'd speak in my second language and then I'll end up interjecting English words and sentences here and there without thought. Relatives/friends that cannot speak both languages will start raising eyebrows while relative/friends that can will completely understand what I was saying (because they do it also.)
    Yes, this is very common.....

    A lot of people from Africa or India in the UK do this.

    It's funny in a way to hear a part Akan or Yoruba sentence or part Hindi or Bengali sentence mixed with English.
    Good result (vs. Soton)...still have to go #Arsene

    Tengo los conocimientos estardiar....no hay un motivo para estar al tanto de la reunión que sucedió hace mucho tiempo ....

Similar Threads

  1. How do you normally identify posts' authors?
    By Brendan in forum The Bonfire
    Replies: 31
    Last Post: 11-22-2015, 05:18 PM
  2. [NF] Do you care how others feel?
    By Alienclock in forum The NF Idyllic (ENFP, INFP, ENFJ, INFJ)
    Replies: 141
    Last Post: 09-03-2008, 11:22 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
Single Sign On provided by vBSSO