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  1. #31
    now! in shell form INA's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by colmena View Post
    Oh I see. Sorry.

    Vague. Complex. Subjective.


    Are you happy?
    Are you content?



    The disappointment with your apathy sounds like depression, to me. How long have you been apathetic? Have your circumstances changed (can you see causation)

    'though obviously a therapists opinion counts for a lot more.


    Yes, I would say I was depressed. The sheer contrast to how I was before suggested to me that something was very very wrong.
    I am not sure how long I have been apathetic. Or numb more like it. I guess I just woke up and realized I have been on an even keel for a while but that it may be because the lurking alternative is a break-out of the batshit crazies. I kid I kid. I think. I'm safely serenely numb. So much so that a therapist sounds like overkill. All I know is I have been more viscerally happy than I am now, and I want it back.
    hoarding time and space
    A single event can awaken within us a stranger totally unknown to us. To live is to be slowly born.
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  2. #32
    seor member colmena's Avatar
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    When I took literature in school, I focused on complex inference and condemned the visceral as lazy hedonism.

    Perhaps in pursuing MBTI and reading about your type, you've done the very same.

    I think a false, naive logic got me where I am (or where I went). I'd say the visceral is as important as the cerebral; and being around people, sharing emotion as an equal is a good way of working on it.
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    Ti Ne Fi Ni

    -How beautiful, this pale Endymion hour.
    -What are you talking about?
    -Endymion, my dear. A beautiful youth possessed by the moon.
    -Well, forget about him and get to bed.
    -Yes, my dear.

  3. #33
    now! in shell form INA's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by colmena View Post
    When I took literature in school, I focused on complex inference and condemned the visceral as lazy hedonism.

    Perhaps in pursuing MBTI and reading about your type, you've done the very same.

    I think a false, naive logic got me where I am (or where I went). I'd say the visceral is as important as the cerebral; and being around people, sharing emotion as an equal is a good way of working on it.
    Hmm . . . I have a healthy respect for the visceral and have ever seen it as necessary if the cerebral is not to be sterile.
    However, I do have antipathy to the way it is often approached or expressed. Perhaps because I have too much respect for it, interestingly enough, I find that many attempts at expression fail and it would be better to contemplate it inwardly, silently, because otherwise it gets defiled by pretenders the minute they strive to touch it. I have a somewhat similar feeling towards spirituality . . . it is an intensely personal matter and how dare anyone cheapen it with their tawdry little ostentations that are but manipulative showmanship.
    I guess this is where your part about sharing comes in. And I am terrible at the sharing part. Something to look into.
    Thanks.
    hoarding time and space
    A single event can awaken within us a stranger totally unknown to us. To live is to be slowly born.
    — Antoine de Saint-Exupery

  4. #34
    seor member colmena's Avatar
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    I never meant to chew at the subjective. We all perceive and interpret things differently, but I get more peace of mind thinking about the similarities of people.

    By 'sharing', I didn't mean the cheesy "let's have a sharing session." Something as simple as playing cricket with cousins can make me a little more in love with the world: A chance to be creative, to teach, to learn, and to have fun.
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    Ti Ne Fi Ni

    -How beautiful, this pale Endymion hour.
    -What are you talking about?
    -Endymion, my dear. A beautiful youth possessed by the moon.
    -Well, forget about him and get to bed.
    -Yes, my dear.

  5. #35
    No moss growing on me Giggly's Avatar
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    Ooooh, good topic.

    My stab at suggestions:

    1. Avoid others who act apathetic. There are lots and lots of people like this and your tendency will be to gravitate towards them because they share your current beliefs, but you should actually surround yourself around the opposite type of people -- the kind that probably make you want to vomit right now.

    2. Be more actively aware of the things you are taking in through your 5 senses. Make sure they are positive, rather than negative as much as possible. This is especially important with your entertainment. You have a choice of what kind of entertainment you partake in, and you should not actively choose things that desensitize you. Look for the opposite.

    3. Spend time in nature. Find beautiful natural sceneries if you can and go there and meditate or appreciate the aesthetics.

    4. Get a puppy.

  6. #36

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    Well, you've had a lot of good suggestions. I'll try to mention something else.

    I was in this state for a long time.

    There are activities that I simply enjoy, but somehow even those were empty. There were several reasons.

    One, I felt extrememly lonely, and most of my favorite activities were solitary. However, I was able to find people who shared interest in those activities. This helped immensley. New friends add an affirming aspect to the things we like to do. It makes it feel like the things I like are OK, because now I am also spending time with friends, and that is important.

    As for work, that is still a struggle. But things have gotten much better. What are you working for? A pay-check, no matter how good, is usually not enough (unless you are in dager of losing you home, or unable to eat or something like that). Do you have a dream or life-goal that lead you to your particular line of work or your particular job?

    For me, my confidence in ever reaching my dreams were rocked to the core at about the same time I broke-up with my fiancee (partly triggered by my lack of confidence). This was closely followed by a lot of upheaval at work, and some scary events at where my brother and cousin were going to school. A mystic and consultant to my family said someone had put a curse on me. In my rational mind, I didn't believe this, but that idea kept cropping up.

    My motivation has grown as I regained my confidence and direction in life. In my mind, the four elements for motivation:
    1) A clear uderstanding of what I am to perform, not just what results I want from acting.
    2) Good compelling reason for doing what I am doing.
    3) The confidence that I am equal to the tasks.
    4) A clear plan or picture of how I will complete these tasks

    There is a lot of stuff on the net about goal setting. They are mainly for motivation purposes.

    Accept the past. Live for the present. Look forward to the future.
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    "[A] scientist looking at nonscientific problems is just as dumb as the next guy." Richard Feynman
    "[P]etabytes of [] data is not the same thing as understanding emergent mechanisms and structures." Jim Crutchfield

  7. #37
    Senior Member Ilah's Avatar
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    I think suggestion 1 is really good. It reminds me of some failed "support" groups I joined on line. I got sympathy, but they were all full of people talking about how bad their lives were with hardly any positive words at all. I left them because I felt worse after interaction with them than I did before.

    Ilah


    Quote Originally Posted by Hmm View Post
    Ooooh, good topic.

    My stab at suggestions:

    1. Avoid others who act apathetic. There are lots and lots of people like this and your tendency will be to gravitate towards them because they share your current beliefs, but you should actually surround yourself around the opposite type of people -- the kind that probably make you want to vomit right now.

    2. Be more actively aware of the things you are taking in through your 5 senses. Make sure they are positive, rather than negative as much as possible. This is especially important with your entertainment. You have a choice of what kind of entertainment you partake in, and you should not actively choose things that desensitize you. Look for the opposite.

    3. Spend time in nature. Find beautiful natural sceneries if you can and go there and meditate or appreciate the aesthetics.

    4. Get a puppy.

  8. #38
    Order Now! pure_mercury's Avatar
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    Shake things up a bit. Try a new restaurant or kind of food. Take a trip to a place you've never been to before. Hang out with really enthusiastic people. Read some classic novels. Get outdoors.
    Who wants to try a bottle of merc's "Extroversion Olive Oil?"

  9. #39
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    You've gotten a lot of great suggestions. I recommend reading books on positive thinking, self growth, and goal setting. I recently pulled myself out of quite a slump and joined the 100 Day Reality Challenge. Not sure if it's something that you'd be interested in, but it's really helping me focus on what I want and making me take the necessary steps. Most people are NFs and SPs from what I can tell, and it's a bit new agey, but if it works..?

    The 100 Day Reality Challenge

  10. #40
    Senior Member Grayscale's Avatar
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    develop your ability to appreciate, then do not lose focus of it

    when you experience the good of something in its boldest and most vibrant state, you'll find your motivation


    it's a simple matter of your state of mind. it can make the difference between finding great passion and feeling numb... learn to alter it.

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