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  1. #11
    girl with a pretty smile Honor's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ygolo View Post
    Well, in the cases you mentioned, I think it means the person getting angry valued whatever was perceived to be slighted, or whatever was perceived to be lost waiting for the train.

    However, perceiving something doesn't mean it's real. Perhaps it was, perhaps it wasn't. Also, feeling angry doesn't necessarily mean yelling and shouting, or even fuming, but could lead instead to doing things that lead to consequences we want.
    My question was whether or not it leads to us changing our actions in ways that are evolutionarily consequential in those cases.
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  2. #12
    deplorable basketcase Tellenbach's Avatar
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    Anger is a great motivator (think the Kill Bill movies); it moves us to action and encourages innovative problem-solving. Just today, there is a story of a woman who got ripped off and lost $900 trying to buy a puppy for her sick daughter. One community members got angry and bought the lady a puppy.
    Senator Rand Paul is alive because of modern medicine and because his attacker punches like a girl.

  3. #13
    & Badger, Ratty and Toad Mole's Avatar
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    In the modern world anger is disfunctional. So in order to harm us our enemies try to make us angry.

    As I write the Islamic State is trying to make us angry by cutting the head off an American journalist. They hope we will become so angry we will send our soldiers into the Islamic State to kill Muslims.

    This reinforces their narrative that we are oppressing Muslims. And so recruits Muslims across the world to fight for the Islamic State.

    Fortunately we are literate individuals able to disengage from our emotions and evaluate the situation dispassionately.

  4. #14

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    Quote Originally Posted by Honor View Post
    My question was whether or not it leads to us changing our actions in ways that are evolutionarily consequential in those cases.
    If we are successful in the actions chosen, I think so. At the least, better health. If unsuccessful or poorly adapted, perhaps negatively. It's not the anger itself, but how we act on it that has consequences.

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  5. #15
    is indra's Avatar
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    We must be notified of being wronged, how we must be notified of experiencing harm - pain. Though, a simple flag is not enough - being cognizant of a fact is not enough. A creature would easily forgo their future-state in favor of the gratification awarded here and now through simple ignorance, the way raccoons won't let go of coins despite their balled fist being the reason they can't pull their hand out of the hole it fit through just moments before. There must be a driving force that ensures culpability beyond the mere act of realization - whence, the emotions are born.

  6. #16
    eye of the storm magpie's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by sunyata View Post
    We must be notified of being wronged, how we must be notified of experiencing harm - pain. Though, a simple flag is not enough - being cognizant of a fact is not enough. A creature would easily forgo their future-state in favor of the gratification awarded here and now through simple ignorance, the way raccoons won't let go of coins despite their balled fist being the reason they can't pull their hand out of the hole it fit through just moments before. There must be a driving force that ensures culpability beyond the mere act of realization - whence, the emotions are born.
    Yes, but the instinctual reaction to harm isn't anger, it's fear.
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  7. #17
    is indra's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by hel View Post
    Yes, but the instinctual reaction to harm isn't anger, it's fear.
    Yagyu Munenori cautions - when struck with a blade, it is most typical for an assailant to fly into a rage striking wildly in return. Hitting is easy, he says, being hit without being hit back is the challenge.

    There are likely a bevy of reactions for a multitude of contexts.

  8. #18
    Senior Member prplchknz's Avatar
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    if anger didn't exist we'd probably still have a serf society if not worse
    In no likes experiment.

    that is all

    i dunno what else to say so

  9. #19
    & Badger, Ratty and Toad Mole's Avatar
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    I think that tribes are engaged with the emotions of the tribe in real time; and that literate individuals are detached from their emotions. And that members of an electronic tribe like typology central are becoming re-engaged with the emotions of the etribe in real time.

    So the history of emotions may be written in terms of spoken culture, literate culture, and electronic culture.

  10. #20
    eye of the storm magpie's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by sunyata View Post
    Yagyu Munenori cautions - when struck with a blade, it is most typical for an assailant to fly into a rage striking wildly in return. Hitting is easy, he says, being hit without being hit back is the challenge.

    There are likely a bevy of reactions for a multitude of contexts.
    Yes, that's true. It's complex. I think it might be pedantic for me to argue that rage, in your example, might be a subset of fear. So I won't. Because it's a chemical response meant for survival. That's the evolutionary part. And the name of that response is just semantics.
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