User Tag List

First 123 Last

Results 11 to 20 of 24

Thread: Competition

  1. #11
    I could do things Hard's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    MBTI
    ENFJ
    Enneagram
    1w2 sp/so
    Socionics
    EIE Fe
    Posts
    7,988

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Deceptive View Post
    Case scenario 1:
    Suppose you’re studying a subject where the professor is an unobliging sluggard that denies students past or practice exams. There's also no set textbook for this subject so you’re lost for questions to practice with. Now, suppose, your classmates shrewdly determined that the year prior to yours had practice exams and they managed to secure these practice exams and forward them to some classmates (you were one). If your good acquaintance asks for a copy, would you give it to them if you’re not in direct competition?*
    Yes I would.


    Quote Originally Posted by Deceptive View Post
    Case scenario 2:
    As part of an assessment, you’re required to research recent peer-reviewed articles to debate your topic for an online discussion. You’re very skilled at this, but your friends aren’t. Would you help them achieve good research skills in this case?
    No. I am a very independent worker. I would help them on specific issues as needed, but not overall how to research. That would be far too much work.
    MBTI: ExxJ tetramer
    Functions: Fe > Te > Ni > Se > Si > Ti > Fi > Ne
    Enneagram: 1w2 - 3w4 - 6w5 (The Taskmaster) | sp/so
    Socionics: β-E dimer | -
    Big 5: slOaI
    Temperament: Choleric/Melancholic
    Alignment: Lawful Neutral
    External Perception: Nohari and Johari


  2. #12
    & Badger, Ratty and Toad Mole's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Posts
    18,540

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Deceptive View Post
    Haha, they're not parasites. I can understand why people are competitive; sometimes it's really difficult to get through something and proving to yourself that you're competent through any means can improve your self-esteem, albeit temporarily. Maybe I don't understand competitive people as well as I think I do but most tend to be very insecure about their abilities.

    Amadeus
    Of course the competitive are ontologically insecure. So they must be constantly fighting for security, they must be fighting for their sense of security in their very sense of being.

    On the other hand, the ontologically secure can allow their security of being to overflow into creativity.

    So how do we become ontologically secure? How can we be secure in our very sense of being?

    We become ontologically secure when our parent mirrors our being as very small children. By mirroring us, our parents acknowledge our very being.

    And conversely, when our parents fail to mirror us as small children, that is, fail to love us unconditionally as small children, we feel we must compete for our sense of being or go under.

  3. #13
    Senior Member Amalie Muller's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2014
    MBTI
    ENTP
    Posts
    119

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Mole View Post
    Competition is for the uncreative.

    The uncreative are hollow, they are empty, they have nothing to offer, but give themselves the simulacrum of life by competing with others.

    The uncreative, having nothing to offer themselves, are parasitic on others.

    The uncreative are consumed by ressentiment and seek to feed off then destroy the creative.

    It's Salieri boiling with ressentiment, in order to feel better, kills Mozart.

    The uncreative compete when they can't create.
    Life itself is a competition. Everyone MUST play the game -- or suffer. Creativity generally is just a tool to achieve success.

  4. #14
    Senior Member Amalie Muller's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2014
    MBTI
    ENTP
    Posts
    119

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Mole View Post
    Of course the competitive are ontologically insecure. So they must be constantly fighting for security, they must be fighting for their sense of security in their very sense of being.

    On the other hand, the ontologically secure can allow their security of being to overflow into creativity.

    So how do we become ontologically secure? How can we be secure in our very sense of being?

    We become ontologically secure when our parent mirrors our being as very small children. By mirroring us, our parents acknowledge our very being.

    And conversely, when our parents fail to mirror us as small children, that is, fail to love us unconditionally as small children, we feel we must compete for our sense of being or go under.
    This seems like quite a competitive viewpoint to me.

    The "game" you are playing is to achieve a sense of "inner security" or whatever. It's pretty abstract, but it is still an objective.

    You assume you are successful as you believe you have achieved this state (at least in comparison to "competitive" people) and so you feel superior.

    Truth is, you're just as competitive. But just playing a different game (and you probably aren't very good at the other games).

  5. #15
    this is my winter song EJCC's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    MBTI
    ESTJ
    Enneagram
    173 so/sx
    Posts
    18,448

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Deceptive View Post
    I’m curious about others' attitudes to competition and perceived competition. Below are two scenarios, I want to know what the responses would be.

    Case scenario 1:
    Suppose you’re studying a subject where the professor is an unobliging sluggard that denies students past or practice exams. There's also no set textbook for this subject so you’re lost for questions to practice with. Now, suppose, your classmates shrewdly determined that the year prior to yours had practice exams and they managed to secure these practice exams and forward them to some classmates (you were one). If your good acquaintance asks for a copy, would you give it to them if you’re not in direct competition?*

    Case scenario 2:
    As part of an assessment, you’re required to research recent peer-reviewed articles to debate your topic for an online discussion. You’re very skilled at this, but your friends aren’t. Would you help them achieve good research skills in this case?*
    Same answer to both: I don't know why I wouldn't. So yes.

    Quote Originally Posted by jscrothers View Post
    Overall, the question grade-scaling/bell-curving would change the problem up dramatically for most.
    Yep.
    Quote Originally Posted by Deceptive View Post
    What about competition on a grander scale? It's about having the right resources and skills and using them successfully, right? So some people see networking effectively enough to obtain exams as a skill and therefore if you're deficient, they're beating you (and won't help you out). Would you still share exams?
    Generally speaking, other people's success doesn't threaten my own. This is too abstract and unlikely a threat for me to take it seriously.

    Quote Originally Posted by Deceptive View Post
    Even if grades weren't scaled, you're in competition with them because you've debating against them. If you friends managed to acquire better papers than you, then there's a possibility your grade might be affected. Would you still help out?
    That chance is slim to none. A tiny increase in my grade isn't worth more to me than being on good terms with my friends. Not only would refusing to help be unkind and conniving, but it would be strategically unsound (assuming you gain strategic benefit from having friends!).

    Quote Originally Posted by Deceptive View Post
    Just to clarify, you're debating directly against them, is that why you wouldn't link them to any articles?
    Would they get a higher grade than me if they beat me? If so, then I would probably give them VERY minimal help. Otherwise, there's no real incentive to refuse.
    ~ g e t f e s t i v e ! ~


    EJCC: "The Big Questions in my life right now: 1) What am I willing to live with? 2) What do I have to live with? 3) What can I change for the better?"
    Coriolis: "Is that the ESTJ Serenity Prayer?"



    ESTJ - LSE - ESTj (mbti/socionics)
    1w2/7w6/3w4 so/sx (enneagram)
    want to ask me something? go for it!

  6. #16
    Nyarlathotep ESFJ's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2014
    MBTI
    ISFJ
    Enneagram
    9w1 sx/sp
    Posts
    1,307

    Default

    1.) I would only help them if something was in it for me so to speak(or I felt helping them now would entice them to help me later so should I need help, which I most often do not want anyway, so even then maybe not.), if not I wouldn't even consider doing so. It's quite simply not my problem being that they're only an aquaintance.

    2.) No, I wouldn't be interested in helping mere friends. I'd cut the dead weight as it would only drag me down later.

    The problems, personally speaking, are actually one problem. Possibly none depending on how one looks at it.

  7. #17

    Default

    Maybe probably, if it wasn't a hassle.

  8. #18
    this is my winter song EJCC's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    MBTI
    ESTJ
    Enneagram
    173 so/sx
    Posts
    18,448

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Hard View Post
    No. I am a very independent worker. I would help them on specific issues as needed, but not overall how to research. That would be far too much work.
    Quote Originally Posted by wolfy View Post
    Maybe probably, if it wasn't a hassle.
    Good points here -- I'd help as long as it wasn't too much trouble, and only to the point that I could still do a good job on my own work.
    ~ g e t f e s t i v e ! ~


    EJCC: "The Big Questions in my life right now: 1) What am I willing to live with? 2) What do I have to live with? 3) What can I change for the better?"
    Coriolis: "Is that the ESTJ Serenity Prayer?"



    ESTJ - LSE - ESTj (mbti/socionics)
    1w2/7w6/3w4 so/sx (enneagram)
    want to ask me something? go for it!

  9. #19
    Senior Member Amalie Muller's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2014
    MBTI
    ENTP
    Posts
    119

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Deceptive View Post
    I’m curious about others' attitudes to competition and perceived competition. Below are two scenarios, I want to know what the responses would be.

    Case scenario 1:
    Suppose you’re studying a subject where the professor is an unobliging sluggard that denies students past or practice exams. There's also no set textbook for this subject so you’re lost for questions to practice with. Now, suppose, your classmates shrewdly determined that the year prior to yours had practice exams and they managed to secure these practice exams and forward them to some classmates (you were one). If your good acquaintance asks for a copy, would you give it to them if you’re not in direct competition?*

    Case scenario 2:
    As part of an assessment, you’re required to research recent peer-reviewed articles to debate your topic for an online discussion. You’re very skilled at this, but your friends aren’t. Would you help them achieve good research skills in this case?*


    *your final grade is not scaled i.e:. the grade you achieve will be your final grade, it will not be adjusted according to a bell-shaped curve of the class’ grades.
    Scenario One:

    I've always been far too lazy to do things like revising for exams, or doing past papers. It just doesn't sound fun to me. At all. Also, I've always got pretty good results without this nonsense, so why put in the extra work??

    So yeah, I'd give them it as it's no use to me.

    Scenario Two:

    Depends if I'm busy doing other stuff, and what they give me in return. I might do it if they lend me some of their cool books/DVDs etc.

  10. #20
    & Badger, Ratty and Toad Mole's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Posts
    18,540

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Amalie Muller View Post
    This seems like quite a competitive viewpoint to me.

    The "game" you are playing is to achieve a sense of "inner security" or whatever. It's pretty abstract, but it is still an objective.

    You assume you are successful as you believe you have achieved this state (at least in comparison to "competitive" people) and so you feel superior.

    Truth is, you're just as competitive. But just playing a different game (and you probably aren't very good at the other games).
    I regret to say you don't seem to like Mole. So Mole buries his little nose in his paws and hides from the world.

    And how it hurts: you turn the tables on me and accuse me of being competitive, you accuse me of being superior, you accuse me of being abstract, but finally you tell the world I am not very good at competitive games.

    I am so ashamed, what will everyone think of me? How can I face them ever again?

    I will have to talk to my therapist about this in the hope of regaining my dignity and my inner security.

Similar Threads

  1. Signature Competition
    By Nocapszy in forum The Bonfire
    Replies: 16
    Last Post: 12-13-2012, 12:32 AM
  2. Competitiveness
    By Giggly in forum General Psychology
    Replies: 27
    Last Post: 08-02-2008, 02:05 AM
  3. A game: competition of types
    By nightning in forum Myers-Briggs and Jungian Cognitive Functions
    Replies: 43
    Last Post: 04-23-2008, 09:25 PM
  4. Relational Competition and "Social" Bullying
    By Maverick in forum General Psychology
    Replies: 58
    Last Post: 05-24-2007, 08:24 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
Single Sign On provided by vBSSO