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  1. #61
    Senior Member prplchknz's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Qlip View Post
    I don't hate tradition, I just hate that tradition is the vehicle that keeps many an irrelevant idea from just dyeing off and making room for new ways. I hate any attitude that tradition is unquestionable. But tradition itself can be good.
    this is how I feel, but people think I'm saying tradition should be blindly followed, but I don't believe that. I believe in progress, but going against tradition can hinder progress just like blindly following it can as well
    In no likes experiment.

    that is all

    i dunno what else to say so

  2. #62
    garbage
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    Wanting to shake things up because of the perception that things (or maybe one particular thing) ought to be shaken up for the good of us all. Wanting to rebel in order to establish one's own identity--defining the outside as "not me." Pick your poison.

    Many traditions are just distilled wisdom--they're damn good ideas that have been propagated over time. Others, not so much.

    So, if some good thing happens to be a tradition, I roll with that tradition. If another good thing is extremely nontraditional, I'll roll with it, too. Vice versa, too. Some nontraditional things are just bad ideas (it's not traditional to slice off one's own arms), and some traditions are bad and have stuck around for bad reasons.

    I'm neutral with respect to tradition.

  3. #63
    Senior Member prplchknz's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by garbage View Post
    Wanting to shake things up because of the perception that things (or maybe one particular thing) ought to be shaken up for the good of us all. Wanting to rebel in order to establish one's own identity--defining the outside as "not me." Pick your poison.

    Many traditions are just distilled wisdom--they're damn good ideas that have been propagated over time. Others, not so much.

    So, if some good thing happens to be a tradition, I roll with that tradition. If another good thing is extremely nontraditional, I'll roll with it, too. Vice versa, too. Some nontraditional things are just bad ideas (it's not traditional to slice off one's own arms), and some traditions are bad and have stuck around for bad reasons.

    I'm neutral with respect to tradition.
    exactly. I'm not articulate in writing. I feel like over half the stuff I say gets mis interpretted here, or people have shitty reading comprehension skills. I'll take both for 500
    In no likes experiment.

    that is all

    i dunno what else to say so

  4. #64
    Junior Member persephon-ee's Avatar
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    "trying hard to be different" is often problematic

    but, in my opinion, not as problematic as sticking to traditions, often.

    I, personally, don't give a shit about tradition or stability or simplicity or family, but i have no problem with others feeling differently. a steady, middle class life is my worst fear, but i see the appeal for some people.

    still, "tradition" is often used as an excuse to be bigoted and static, which is bad new bears.

  5. #65
    Sugar Hiccup OrangeAppled's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by prplchknz View Post
    every single person in this thread missed my point.I'm talking about people who are different just to be different, no other reason
    I know few people with that attitude in serious matters. Usually it's more of a struggle to assert personal preferences that are not in line with traditional norms, because people can't fathom it or weirdly feel threatened by it, as if you're judging them for being "traditional" by your choice not to be. In turn, they judge the non-traditional as rebellious or silly. And I think THAT may cause what looks like a defiant attitude towards tradition - the sense of being judged for going against it, because those who stick to it feel they're being "rejected", so they judge defensively also, etc. People are very "reactive" to each other in that way.
    Often a star was waiting for you to notice it. A wave rolled toward you out of the distant past, or as you walked under an open window, a violin yielded itself to your hearing. All this was mission. But could you accomplish it? (Rilke)

    INFP | 4w5 sp/sx | RLUEI - Primary Inquisitive | Tritype is tripe

  6. #66
    The Typing Tabby grey_beard's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Urarienev View Post
    I don't really like tradition.

    But it's not like I don't like it just because I want to be different or something. That's stupid.

    I just don't like blindly following what others have done in the past, without asking why.

    If I like something, I like it, if I don't I don't. But it takes me quite a bit of time to figure out what I actually like.
    Quote Originally Posted by Coriolis View Post
    Traditions are those customs and practices which are handed down from generation to generation. Yes, they will be different for different cultures, so what is traditional in one culture may not be in another. Traditions eventually change, and we can even make new traditions, but if you are doing something relatively uncommon in the past couple of generations, you are probably not following tradition. Still OK - just not traditional.
    Quote Originally Posted by Qlip View Post
    I don't hate tradition, I just hate that tradition is the vehicle that keeps many an irrelevant idea from just dyeing off and making room for new ways. I hate any attitude that tradition is unquestionable. But tradition itself can be good.
    Quote Originally Posted by prplchknz View Post
    this is how I feel, but people think I'm saying tradition should be blindly followed, but I don't believe that. I believe in progress, but going against tradition can hinder progress just like blindly following it can as well
    Quote Originally Posted by garbage View Post
    Wanting to shake things up because of the perception that things (or maybe one particular thing) ought to be shaken up for the good of us all. Wanting to rebel in order to establish one's own identity--defining the outside as "not me." Pick your poison.

    Many traditions are just distilled wisdom--they're damn good ideas that have been propagated over time. Others, not so much.

    So, if some good thing happens to be a tradition, I roll with that tradition. If another good thing is extremely nontraditional, I'll roll with it, too. Vice versa, too. Some nontraditional things are just bad ideas (it's not traditional to slice off one's own arms), and some traditions are bad and have stuck around for bad reasons.

    I'm neutral with respect to tradition.
    Quote Originally Posted by OrangeAppled View Post
    I know few people with that attitude in serious matters. Usually it's more of a struggle to assert personal preferences that are not in line with traditional norms, because people can't fathom it or weirdly feel threatened by it, as if you're judging them for being "traditional" by your choice not to be. In turn, they judge the non-traditional as rebellious or silly. And I think THAT may cause what looks like a defiant attitude towards tradition - the sense of being judged for going against it, because those who stick to it feel they're being "rejected", so they judge defensively also, etc. People are very "reactive" to each other in that way.
    @Urarienev, @Coriolis, @Qlip, @prplchknz, @garbage, @OrangeAppled --

    Here's a short quote on the subject...from 1905.

    Suppose that a great commotion arises in the street about something, let us say a lamp-post, which many influential persons desire to pull down. A grey-clad monk, who is the spirit of the Middle Ages, is approached upon the matter, and begins to say, in the arid manner of the Schoolmen, “Let us first of all consider, my brethren, the value of Light. If Light be in itself good–” At this point he is somewhat excusably knocked down. All the people make a rush for the lamp-post, the lamp-post is down in ten minutes, and they go about congratulating each other on their unmediaeval practicality. But as things go on they do not work out so easily. Some people have pulled the lamp-post down because they wanted the electric light; some because they wanted old iron; some because they wanted darkness, because their deeds were evil. Some thought it not enough of a lamp-post, some too much; some acted because they wanted to smash municipal machinery; some because they wanted to smash something. And there is war in the night, no man knowing whom he strikes. So, gradually and inevitably, to-day, to-morrow, or the next day, there comes back the conviction that the monk was right after all, and that all depends on what is the philosophy of Light. Only what we might have discussed under the gas-lamp, we now must discuss in the dark.
    "Love never needs time. But friendship always needs time. More and more and more time, up to long past midnight." -- The Crime of Captain Gahagan

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  7. #67
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    because of an era of acquarius

  8. #68
    nee andante bechimo's Avatar
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    If the individual has deconstructed the traditional framework and still considers the tradition worth keeping, then all the power to them. But if they accept tradition blindly, then this points to a mindset that I have no respect for.

  9. #69
    Senior Member prplchknz's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by andante View Post
    If the individual has deconstructed the traditional framework and still considers the tradition worth keeping, then all the power to them. But if they accept tradition blindly, then this points to a mindset that I have no respect for.
    Yes. I'm talking about blindly following I'm talking about people going against a tradition and being anti it for no other reason than it's considered a tradition
    In no likes experiment.

    that is all

    i dunno what else to say so

  10. #70
    nee andante bechimo's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by prplchknz View Post
    Yes. I'm talking about blindly following I'm talking about people going against a tradition and being anti it for no other reason than it's considered a tradition
    I agree with this too. Some traditions have utility where the individual's needs will define utility or not.

    This is my issue with ideologues and ideologies. No legs.

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