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  1. #21
    Senior Member NK258's Avatar
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    I think it could be handled well if we integrate it within science requirement and educate it from that angle. Neuroscience can teach us so much about how our brain and emotions work that I think it easily to communicate the messages and techniques for people to prevent themselves from operating in rote fashion in response to their emotions.

    This is not to say we wouldn't have the experiences with which to learn from. just it might not need to have major life events and/or so many years to gain the lessons in order for EQ to develop. In some cases, it never develops. I just think it would be absurd to not try because of fear. Which ironically, would be a low EQ stand point with which to make the decision from. HA!
    6w7 Sx/Sp (621 or 612. Same diff :p).

  2. #22
    Member Solar Plexus's Avatar
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    There definitely is a neurological angle to it. With regards to how to implement material about Emotional Intelligence, I think simply educating students on the subject itself could have some benefit. When I was in high school, there was no information about psychology whatsoever. I was suffering from debilitating social anxiety and depression and never even heard of the term "social-anxiety" or knew there was a diagnosis and treatment for the feelings I was experiencing. My parents were ignorant about psychology themselves and it never occurred to them that I needed any sort of psychological counseling. Neither did my teachers show any concern. Perhaps, my symptoms weren't obvious to others; since I rarely expressed my feelings outwardly; but the fact that there was no information available which I could've used to help myself is quite troubling in retrospect.
    Last edited by Solar Plexus; 02-11-2014 at 07:19 PM.

  3. #23
    Analytical Dreamer Coriolis's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by NK258 View Post
    Kind of like how we taught our children to not have unprotected sex?
    No, actually. I'm not sure we have taught that so effectively, but I would make other parallels. See below.

    Quote Originally Posted by NK258 View Post
    I do agree with you. But it isn't the reality. You're much too idealistic in my opinion to think that the best way, is going to be actualized.
    I never said it would be actualized, just that it would be the most effective way. Very little in schools, however, is done in the most effective way.

    Quote Originally Posted by NK258 View Post
    Yet, we aren't promoting emotional intelligence preferring our students to be ignorant to how their brains work? Makes no sense. Seems an illogical sequence. I don't really see a down side in teaching EQ (and/or associated lessons) within schools.
    It all depends on how it is taught. For one parallel, consider civic responsibility. We teach this already in schools on a factual level: who is eligible to vote, how the election process works, how the courts work, principles of justice like presumption of innocence and right to trial by jury. But look at the voter turnout in the U.S. and the general tendency for citizens to avoid jury duty at all costs. Clearly a theoretical knowledge does not translate into responsible and constructive behavior. EI training would amount to the same thing, unless it is implemented as indoctrination or brainwashing, which would be wrong for other reasons.

    Quote Originally Posted by Solar Plexus View Post
    There definitely is a neurological angle to it. With regards to how to implement material about Emotional Intelligence, I think simply educating students on the subject itself could have some benefit. When I was in high school, there was no information about psychology whatsoever. I was suffering from debilitating social anxiety and depression and never even heard of the term "social-anxiety" or knew there was a diagnosis and treatment for the feelings I was experiencing. My parents were largely ignorant about psychology themselves and it never occurred to them that I needed any sort of psychological counseling. Neither did any of my teachers show any concern. Perhaps, my symptoms weren't obvious to others; since I rarely expressed my feelings outwardly; but the fact that there was no information available which I could've used to help myself is quite troubling in retrospect.
    I see definite value in teaching students about psychology, and also physiology of how the brain works. As in my civics example above, however, this is in no way guaranteed to promote more constructive emotional behavior. A more realistic goal is the destigmatization of mental illness, so the current generation of students is as willing to seek help for mental issues as for colds, flus, and broken bones.

    We want to teach children many things, from knowledge to skills to just exposing them to things like art, music, sports, other cultures, etc. Not all things can be taught in the same way, even considering the differences in learning style among students. Some things we want students to learn are more like habits than skills or knowledge. This includes civic responsibility, and even good study/work habits. We don't teach kids the theory of how to pay attention to detail, or keep track of deadlines, or organize their work; rather we work with kids individually and in small groups to help them develop these valuable habits, understanding that not everyone will do it the same way, and that it comes more naturally to some than to others. I would put emotional intelligence into the same category, at least to the extent that we want it to influence how students behave rather than just be regurgitated on a test. This means we (teachers, principals, everyone involved with students) must first and foremost model it, and then work with students to help them develop it, each in their own way.

    Yes, it is doubtful that schools - at least public schools - will adopt this approach. It is equally doubtful that a more theoretical or knowledge-based approach will achieve the desired results.
    I've been called a criminal, a terrorist, and a threat to the known universe. But everything you were told is a lie. The truth is, they've taken our freedom, our home, and our future. The time has come for all humanity to take a stand...

  4. #24
    can't handcuff the wind Z Buck McFate's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Coriolis View Post
    It all depends on how it is taught. For one parallel, consider civic responsibility. We teach this already in schools on a factual level: who is eligible to vote, how the election process works, how the courts work, principles of justice like presumption of innocence and right to trial by jury. But look at the voter turnout in the U.S. and the general tendency for citizens to avoid jury duty at all costs. Clearly a theoretical knowledge does not translate into responsible and constructive behavior. EI training would amount to the same thing, unless it is implemented as indoctrination or brainwashing, which would be wrong for other reasons.
    Yep- the way we teach the Constitution is an excellent example. Teaching about democracy with an autocratic approach isn't actually teaching democracy. (Poorly phrased, but I hope my point got across. John Dewey's Democracy and Education is one of my favorite books ever.)
    Reality is a collective hunch. -Lily Tomlin

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