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  1. #11
    Paranoid Android Video's Avatar
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    1. Emotional education would be uniquely damaging to the students if the school fucks it up.

    2. As great as the idea is, I don't trust them not to fuck it up in practice. Standardizing emotional growth would be just one way to do so.
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  2. #12
    Senior Member prplchknz's Avatar
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    actually when I was little the program i was in 1st-4th grade taught emotional intelligence, didn't know that's what it was called. there was a puppet involved, but I'm not sure if it helped or not. but it was a small private school so it was easier to implement.
    In no likes experiment.

    that is all

    i dunno what else to say so

  3. #13
    Analytical Dreamer Coriolis's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by AzulEyes View Post
    Just coming out of a friendship with a person extremely stunted emotionally- can I just say- it's devastating. (For my friend mostly- to live a life trying to navigate personal and professional relationships without the emotional maturity and health necessary to just get by.) And it's devastating for those unlucky enough to be in the path of very negative beahaviors that can result..
    What did this person do that causes you to consider them stunted emotionally? What does that even mean? How does he an those he interacts with suffer? It seems judging emotional behavior itself would be highly subjective.
    I've been called a criminal, a terrorist, and a threat to the known universe. But everything you were told is a lie. The truth is, they've taken our freedom, our home, and our future. The time has come for all humanity to take a stand...

  4. #14
    Senior Member NK258's Avatar
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    I believe they could easily teach emotional intelligence within the schools by including it within the science requirements. There is a plethora of scientific material that describes what happens to us under stress or perceived attack to our person. We all have 3 brains; our reptilian brain, the middle brain and the prefrontal cortex and I do believe it absolutely reasonable to slip in the lessons under the umbrella of science.

    There is also stephen covey material currently being adopted by several grammar schools throughout the US which holds seminars (?) regarding character etc. But the former seems to be the more logical course of action to reap the most valuable results. It's reasonable and within the realms of academics.

    I'm not so sure why the school system would discourage the addition of materials.

    There was a time where teaching sex ed was frowned upon. Maybe it's time we stopped putting the carriage before the horse.

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  5. #15
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    Interestingly emotional intelligence and critical intelligence are two sides of the same coin of intelligence.

    And it is the interaction of emotional intelligence and critical intelligence that makes us intelligent.

  6. #16
    Senior Member AzulEyes's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Coriolis View Post
    What did this person do that causes you to consider them stunted emotionally? What does that even mean? How does he an those he interacts with suffer? It seems judging emotional behavior itself would be highly subjective.
    Omg- you don't know the half of it. I suspect my friend suffers from Borderline Personality Disorder plus Psychosis episodes. He created an online alter ego that he tortured me with. He has tortured people before me with wacky, outrageous behavior. I really can't get into it- and I don't say this shit lightly. He put me through hell for 2 years.
    It takes courage to grow up and become who you really are. ~e.e. cummings

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  7. #17
    Analytical Dreamer Coriolis's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by NK258 View Post
    I believe they could easily teach emotional intelligence within the schools by including it within the science requirements.
    The best way for schools to teach emotional intelligence is by demonstrating it. Kids, especially young ones, learn by example and will reflect what they are surrounded with to large degree.
    I've been called a criminal, a terrorist, and a threat to the known universe. But everything you were told is a lie. The truth is, they've taken our freedom, our home, and our future. The time has come for all humanity to take a stand...

  8. #18
    Senior Member NK258's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Coriolis View Post
    The best way for schools to teach emotional intelligence is by demonstrating it. Kids, especially young ones, learn by example and will reflect what they are surrounded with to large degree.
    Kind of like how we taught our children to not have unprotected sex? I do agree with you. But it isn't the reality. You're much too idealistic in my opinion to think that the best way, is going to be actualized. I think it would be best to lower our standards, and be aware, that the "best" probably won't happen until a generation or two are taught. Also, I don't believe this issue crosses any major lines regarding beliefs. So it is a wonder how we got sex education in schools ... Yet, we aren't promoting emotional intelligence preferring our students to be ignorant to how their brains work? Makes no sense. Seems an illogical sequence. I don't really see a down side in teaching EQ (and/or associated lessons) within schools.
    6w7 Sx/Sp (621 or 612. Same diff :p).

  9. #19
    Member Solar Plexus's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by NK258 View Post
    So it is a wonder how we got sex education in schools ... Yet, we aren't promoting emotional intelligence preferring our students to be ignorant to how their brains work? Makes no sense. Seems an illogical sequence. I don't really see a down side in teaching EQ (and/or associated lessons) within schools.
    I agree. I definitely think the evidence warrants intervention. According to the video, over the last few decades, athough IQ levels have gone up among students, EQ levels have drastically gone down which has led to a number of self-destructive and anti-social behaviors. And these are the young adults who are entering the workforce. In an ideal world, kids would learn emotional intelligence growing up from their parents, but it seems that a large number of young people are not acquiring these important skills and it is taking a toll on society as a whole.

    This website: http://www.personalitypathways.com addresses general correlations or trends between mbti types and Emotional Intelligence. Interestingly, it debunks the notion that Feelers are necessarily more emotionally intelligent than Thinkers. According to his findings, ENTJs and ESTJs generally exhibit the greatest level of emotional intelligence and ISFJs and INFPs the least. I can't speak for all INFPs, but despite having a rather high IQ (which INFPs supposedly often do), I have been lacking in at least three of the five categories of emotional intelligence, specifically Managing Emotions, Motivating Oneself and Handling Relationships. Though I have relatively high empathy and I believe a great deal of self-awareness, my deficit in the other areas of emotional intelligence has created many unnecessary hardships in my life; (and it seems that a lot of other INFPs struggle with the same issues, as far as negative stereotypes go.)

    In a the recent issue of the Bulletin for Psychological Type (Vol. 29, No.3 2006), one of the authors, Henry “Dick” Thompson (2006, p. 18), reported on some of his research into EI and Type. One finding I found quite interesting was that of the 5 personality types with the highest overall EQ score, three preferred Feeling and two preferred Thinking. In fact the top 2 were ENTJ and ESTJ ! (followed by ENFJ, ESFP, and ENFP). Of the 5 personality types with the lowest overall EQ score, three were Feeling types and two were Thinking types. And surprisingly, the bottom two were Feeling types: ISFJ and INFP! People looking for a correlation between EQ and Feeling won’t find it in Thompson’s research! About the only conclusion Thompson seemed willing to risk from this study was it appears that the EQ measures have a bias towards Extraversion.

    Another authority of Personality Type, Elizabeth Murphy (2006, p. 26), reported on a study that found a correlation between dominant Intuition and high EI scores. Murphy noted that this same study, like Thompson's, found no relationship between EI and Feeling. In noting some of the unexplainable EI relationship to Type, Murphy offered the following advice: “. . . if someone is working with you and they offer suggestions or strategies for practicing any of the EQ skills that do not have a good fit for your style, check with someone who shares your type to see if they have any insight into an effective system that will work for you. The outcome of self-awareness, self-management, social awareness, and relationship management is available to all types. How you attain that level of success is unique to your type.”

  10. #20
    i love skylights's Avatar
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    The sex ed parallel is interesting. But when I think about my sex ed experience... it felt like a joke. I hate to say that for any teachers and administrators - and students - who were really invested in it, but the presentation was awful. They used old 80s movies which felt foreign and patronizing, and "the only really safe sex is abstinence" was perhaps the most emphatic point of the class. It wasn't realistic. People were so touchy about the topic that it wasn't handled effectively. It was referred to, inferred, danced around, and generally seen by everyone, including many of the people who had to teach it, as a waste of time. One of my sex ed teachers was a football coach completely uninterested in teaching sex ed (it was grouped with health/PE) and let us know that from the get-go.

    So, like Misty, I share similar concerns that it won't be handled well, which is underscored by Coriolis' point that the system has to have some degree of emotional intelligence itself before attempting to teach emotional intelligence, and I don't think they're anywhere near there yet. I went to private schools for my earlier education and we had some guidance counselors who taught EQ-related lessons early on, and much like PE, I remember our instructive materials being outdated and the lessons being patronizing - the middle school guidance counselor, for example, enjoyed using a large puppet in her classes.

    Though - the high school where my boyfriend teaches includes time for social workers to teach and/or lead exercises on psychological, social, and emotional wellbeing, and I think that's a step in the right direction. It's just... some use the time to actually lead the kids, and others cop out and have the kids play cards.

    So it really depends on whether the school system can step up and take the issue seriously enough to reform both itself and its curricula as to whether it could successfully implement the inclusion of EQ.

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